March 30, 2016

Salman Rushdie Header

With the recent acts of violence against Charlie Hebdo, writers' and artists' freedom of expression, pertaining to political correctness, is once again being called into question. This controversy can result in a set of questions: Does an offensive or disrespectful portrayal of the Prophet Mohammed in a satirical cartoon realize or betray American and European values of pluralism and multiculturalism? How do we defend the freedom of secular-artistic expression against other peoples’ religiously-motivated fundamental rejection of such satire? How do we show respect towards those individuals who do not necessarily take part in or support the secular culture of their own country? How can we successfully integrate two fundamental pillars of transatlantic societies - respect for religious belief/practice and free expression of ideas - to create the open and pluralistic communities towards which we as Europeans and Americans have been striving for centuries?

NYU Washington, DC and the European Union National Institutes of Culture welcomed acclaimed writer, and Writer in Residence at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at NYU, Salman Rushdie for a reading of an except of his most current book, Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights, followed by a discussion on the role of satire in the public sphere, moderated by Lisa Page, Director of Creative Writing at the George Washington University.

Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie

Lisa Page

Lisa Page

Goethe

EUNIC

NYU Brademas Center