March 23, 2021

Future of Chocolate City Web Page Banner

The Nation's Capital has always been Chocolate City - but will it continue to be? Home of the largest slave trading city in the 19th century to the center of Black culture as the first majority Black city in the 20th century, Washington, DC is rooted in Black power. It’s the 21st century, however, and Chocolate City is at stake. 2019 showed Washington, DC held the highest gentrification rate across its neighborhoods than any other U.S. city. Today, the Black population has fallen to less than 45% from its peak over sixty years ago. 

The erasure of Chocolate City is more than changing demographics: it is systematic and structural racism at play in the heart of this country. This identity and narrative of Washington, DC must continue to be spoken, heard, and seen. Recent movements such as Black Lives Matter and DC statehood can contribute to preserving Chocolate City, but it will take much more action and change to revive Black Washington.

The audience heard from a distinguished panel that included Jamal Holtz, Project Manager and Assistant to the President, LINK Strategic Partners who served as moderator for the discussion, Mignotae Kebede, Director, What Happened 2 Chocolate City, Willow Lung-Amam, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Urban Studies and Planning; Director, Community Development, National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education, University of Maryland, Andre Perry, Ph.D., Senior Fellow, Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings; Scholar-in-residence, American University; Columnist, Hechinger Report, and Sabiyha Prince, Ph.D., Urban Anthropologist; Artist.

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Jamal Holtz

Jamal Holtz

Mignotae Kebede

Mignotae Kebede

Dr. Willow Lung-Amam

Dr. Willow Lung-Amam

Dr. Andre Perry

Dr. Andre Perry

Dr. Sabiyha Prince

Dr. Sabiyha Prince

Christina Bowllan

Christina Bowllan