Internships and Fellowships provide unique opportunities for students to explore their professional interests with Australian-based organizations.

Two distinct internship programs are offered: the Academic (for-credit) Internship Program and the non-credit Beyond the Classroom program.

Non-Credit Internships

Students applying to the Beyond the Classroom (BTC) program will work with local NYU Sydney staff to identify an internship placement or volunteer experience. NYU Sydney does not guarantee that a specific placement selection will lead to an internship. Before confirming placement, an initial interview with the host organization must take place.

The time commitment for a non-credit internship tends to be less than the for-credit program. There is no fixed hourly requirements for BTC placements, however, students typically intern for one to two days. NYU Sydney students are expected to honor any schedules that have been agreed upon with host organizations. Punctuality, work ethic and attendance must be taken seriously.

As well as attending their internship, BTC participants must attend meetings with the Student Life Coordinator to discuss the internship experience. These meetings will provide opportunities to explore the differences and similarities that exist between U.S. and Australian work culture. During these meetings the Student Life Coordinator will help you to identify strategies to market the experience and skills you develop to future employers.

Students who have engaged in non-credit internships in previous semesters have found that the program has complemented their academic experience, built on their professional skills, provided them with international industry exposure and deepened their connection to the local Sydney community.

Placement Opportunities

Below is a list of fields where students have previously been placed. Just like in the U.S., internship opportunities are competitive and placements can’t always be guaranteed. NYU Sydney works to create new internship and volunteer opportunities each year. If you do not see your area of interest listed, or you are interested in working with a specific organization, please do not hesitate to contact us at nyusydney.btc@nyu.edu or note this in your application form.

1. Media & Communications, Journalism, Politics, Environmental Studies, Social Activism

2. Film

3. Performing Arts, Photography, Design, Entertainment, PR

4. International Education, Higher Education

5. International Business, International Relations, Business, Marketing, Finance

6. Anthropology, Museum Studies, Indigenous Art

7. Creative Writing, Education

8. Psychology, CAMS, Health, Nutrition

9. Science

Recent Placement Areas

  • Legal administration and translation for a refugee legal center
  • Writing for a science, technology, engineering and math content producer
  • Campaign assistance and writing for a grassroots environmental advocacy firm
  • Production assistance for a boutique production company
  • Public relations assistance for a non-profit mental health organization 
  • Research for an Australian University-led project relating to women in corrections
  • Supporting a volunteer agency with marketing and communications
  • Working in the collection management of the Indigenous Archaeological collection.

Please note that medical internships are historically difficult to secure in Australia. This is due to domestic competition and compliance regulations.

If you secure a placement working with children, you will need to apply for Working with Children Check in advance.

Application Instructions

Submit online application (Applications open October 1 for Spring and April 1 for Fall)

Deadline for submissions is 5pm, November 1 for Spring and May 1 for Fall (NY Time)

The online application requires students to answer a series of questions designed to help them articulate what they would like to learn and accomplish, and to indicate what type of placements interest them most. Students will be required to upload a resume.

Click the online application to apply now.

Student working at the Sydney Story Factory

"During my internship at a non-profit creative writing centre, I was able to work with children from traditionally underrepresented communities including Aboriginal and Torrest Strait Islander Peoples. These children taught me things I never knew before and their outlook on the world is so wonderfully different. Despite some difficulties at home they managed to work hard every week and make my job so much more interesting and fulfilling. It was an amazing experience and one which I will always remember."

- English major, NYU Sydney Spring '18

Global Public Health and Applied Psychology major, NYU Sydney Fall '16

"As an undergraduate psychology student, it's hard to find opportunities in the field that are both supportive and challenging, that foster learning while allowing for contribution. Fortunately, I was able to join a new research team at the University of Technology, Sydney, where I worked alongside a well-known professor of public health and a wonderful team to study a prominent issue concerning women and domestic violence. Not only did I get to take on responsibilities I may not have been given in the US, but the team continues to give me opportunities even after I left. The internship was a great way to dive into deeper, controversial issues that I was able to continue thinking about once I have returned home. I was able to experience Sydney as more than just flat whites and Maxibons (both great), and it's a valuable experience unique to me."

- Global Public Health and Applied Psychology major, NYU Sydney Fall '16.

CAS student, Spring 2014, Chemistry lab research internship

"As a premedical student interested in research and global experiences, interning at ... was the perfect choice for me. As a research assistant, I was given my own project which was to 'investigate DNA recovery and profiling of blood and saliva contaminated fingermarks after the enhancement with immunogenic reagents'. A world-renowned forensic scientist, worked beside me and mentored me in experimental methods and chemical analysis. Through this internship, I was able to be a coauthor of a developing journal publication, contributor to a forensic conference and primary author of poster publications. The opportunities and knowledge I gained from working at...were unparalleled and it was an internship that completed my experience at NYU Sydney."

- Premedical student, CAS, Spring '14, Chemistry lab research internship