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The Legacy of Nathaniel Branden: Memorial and a JARS Call for Papers

Today, the Atlas Society, John and Danis Fickewirth, and the family of Nathaniel Branden are sponsoring a memorial gathering to honor Branden's life and achievements. Having passed away in December 2014, Nathaniel Branden will be honored at Ebell of Los Angeles (743 S Lucerne Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90005) from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM (PST). Through an arrangement with my friend, Duncan Scott, a wonderful film and television writer, director, and producer, the memorial will be streamed live here. After the streaming, a video of the service will be provided for viewing some days later. I will provide a postscript to this blog entry as soon as the video link is made available.

Today, I would like to announce that The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies has issued a Call for Papers for a forthcoming symposium that will assess the legacy and work of Nathaniel Branden.

I would like to mention that this symposium has been long-planned; it was, in fact, in the planning stages while Nathaniel was still with us, and he was aware that the journal was working toward a discussion of his legacy. I know that he and his wife, Leigh, were enthusiastic about our proposal. We already have several internationally known scholars on board. I look forward to seeing a discussion that will honor the journal's commitment to fostering scholarly dialogue through a respectful interdisciplinary exchange of ideas, drawn from a variety of interpretive and critical perspectives.

Anyone who would like to submit proposals for contributions to the symposium, should write to me at chris DOT sciabarra AT nyu DOT edu. Further details will be provided in my introduction to the next issue of the journal, which will be in the hands of subscribers in July 2015 (Volume 15, No. 1).

Unable to attend today's memorial, I am there in spirit, and express my sympathies to all of those who grieve the passing of this path-breaking father of the self-esteem movement in psychology, and who celebrate his many accomplishments. Among these accomplishments, he was the first person to systematize Ayn Rand's philosophy, and to point toward those benefits and hazards of orthodoxy, to which he himself had contributed in the early days of the Objectivist movement. In my view, his post-Randian years include writings that are an astonishing monument to the theoretical and practical tasks required to honor the self and to live the good life.

More than this, and quite apart from the forthcoming JARS symposium, I just wish to say that Nathaniel was a loyal and dear friend to the end, and I remain deeply saddened by his passing. Fortunately, we have a solid body of scholarship left behind with which to grapple. I look forward to the work that emerges from this scholarly adventure.

Postscript (5 March 2015): The video of the Memorial Service for Nathaniel Branden can now be viewed in its entirety at this link. Thank you to Leigh Branden for providing me with this link.