June 25, 2018

Song of the Day #1588

Song of the Day: Scream features the words and music of Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis and siblings Janet Jackson and Michael Jackson, whose recording of this duet was released in May 1995. The critically acclaimed video would go on to win three MTV Video Music Awards (for "Best Dance Video," "Best Choreography," and "Best Art Direction"), as well as a Grammy
Award for Best Music Video
. Check out the original video single, the Flyte Tyme Remix and the Naughty Remix (featuring a rap by Treach of Naughty by Nature) [YouTube links]. On this day, nine years ago, MJ was "gone too soon." This song gave his sister a chance to provide a touching tribute to her brother at the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards [YouTube link], as Janet matched the choreographic moves of MJ live on stage, with the video to this #1 Dance Club Song as her background. And for an extra treat, check out a classic Disconet medley of some of MJ's hits put to a fine video edit [YouTube]---giving us a glimpse of why he was one of the finest "song and dance men" of his generation.

June 24, 2018

Song of the Day #1587

Song of the Day: Man in the Mirror, featuring the words and music of Siedah Garrett and Glen Ballard, was the fourth of five consecutive #1 singles released from Michael Jackson's "Bad," the 1987 solo album that followed the massive success of "Thriller," still the biggest-selling album in music history. This song features not only Jackson's classic vocals [a cappella link], but the background vocals of Garrett (who sang a duet with Jackson on the album's first #1 hit, "I Just Can't Stop Loving You"), The Winan's, and the Andrae Crouch Choir. Check out the single version, the extended version, the official video version, and the inevitable dance remix. Also check out his performance of the song at the 1988 Grammy Awards (which followed a jazzy live performance of the third #1 single from the same album, "The Way You Make Me Feel") [YouTube links]. This begins a two-day tribute to MJ in remembrance of his untimely passing on June 25, 2009.

June 23, 2018

Song of the Day #1586

Song of the Day: Unbreak My Heart, words and music by Diane Warren, was one of the most successful singles in the history of the Billboard charts. Produced by David Foster and recorded by Toni Braxton for her album "Secrets," she went on to win the Grammy for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance. As a power ballad, the song spent 11 weeks at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100, 14 weeks at #1 on the Adult Contemporary Chart, but in several dance remixes, it attained the #1 spot on the Dance Club Chart for four weeks. Check out the video ballad version, and then, get back on that dance floor with the Frankie Knuckles Radio edit, the full Frankie Knuckles 12" Remix, the Soul-Hex Vocal Anthem mix, and a live performance at the 1996 Billboard Music Awards that combined the ballad and dance sounds of an unforgettable hit.

June 22, 2018

Louis Prima Sets Billboard Record

From Billboard magazine comes some interesting news for long-time Louis Prima fans. Because of the contemporary penchant for sampling, it appears that Louis Prima, legendary jazz trumpeter, singer, composer, and bandleader, who died in August 1978, and whose last appearance on the Hot 100 was on February 13, 1961, for the #15 song "Wonderland by Night" [YouTube link] has just set a record. The new hip hop group, Kids See Ghosts, made up of Kanye West and Kid Cudi, has heavily sampled from Prima's 1936 recording of "What Will Santa Claus Say (When He Finds Everybody Swingin')" [YouTube link], for their own song "4th Dimension" [YouTube link].

That song debuts at #42 on the Hot 100 this week, which "ends a record break of 57 years, four months and two weeks between Hot 100 appearances" for Prima.

For somebody who once sang "I Ain't Got Nobody" [YouTube link] as part of a medley with "Just a Gigolo", one thing is clear: He's got a record he may hold on to for a very long time!

Song of the Day #1585

Song of the Day: Turn the Beat Around, words and music by Gerald Jackson and Peter Jackson, was recorded by Vicki Sue Robinson for her 1976 debut album "Never Gonna Let You Go." A bona fide Disco Classic with a raw percussive edge, this single went to #10 on the Billboard Hot 100 and spent four weeks at #1 on the Dance Club Chart. Check out the original extended mix [YouTube link]. The song was subsequently covered by Laura Branigan and Gloria Estefan [YouTube links], whose version also went to #1 on the Dance Club Chart in 1994.

June 21, 2018

Song of the Day #1584

Song of the Day: The Twist features the words and music of Hank Ballard and it was Hank Ballard and the Midnighters [YouTube link] who first recorded this song as a B-sided single in 1959. That original version peaked at #28 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1960. Later that year, along came a gentleman named Chubby Checker, whose cover version hit the top of the Hot 100 in September 1960 and again in January 1962, leading Billboard to declare it the "biggest hit" of the 1960s. "The Twist" was also the name of the dance that sparked a wordwide dance craze. Even at 2 years old, I was twisting and turning to the sounds of this mega-hit. In 2018, it was among six songs named to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's inaugural class of singles recognized as having influenced the course of rock. With the summer solstice having arrived today in the Northern Hemisphere at 6:07 a.m. ET, this song kicks off our Third Annual Summer Dance Party, which unlike previous celebrations, will be highlighting dance hits from the 1950s through today, with special emphasis on the hits of yesteryear. Check out the original Chubby Checker #1 hit [YouTube link].

Our Little Cali-co Finds a Family

On March 16, 1987, our family suffered some real heartache when our cat, Buttons, passed away at the age of 18 years. We swore we'd never get another pet.

By 1990, that sworn promise was broken when our dog Blondie entered our lives. She would live to the age of 16, dying on January 12, 2006. And we swore we'd never get another pet.

Until Dante entered our lives not too long thereafter. But on November 11, 2017, our family suffered more heartache when Dante died, at 17 1/2 years of age. And we swore we'd never get another pet.

The amazing thing about each of our pets is that every one of them had their own personality, their own quirks, which made each of them truly unique, and none of them a mere "replacement" for the last one lost. Pets have always had a way of finding us, rather than the other way around.

The human heart is immense, and "Pet People"---folks who form very real connections to their pets, and who benefit from the companionship and the "visibility" (a la "The Muttnik Principle") that a pet provides---have an almost limitless capacity to fall in love again, even after the devastating loss of a cherished member of the family.

Apparently, about 9 days after we had brought Dante's body to our neighborhood clinic (The Jacobson Veterinary Clinic) for cremation, our vet, Dr. Linda Jacobson, welcomed into that clinic a cat named Cali (short for Calico). She was 5 months old, having been born on June 21, 2017. She immediately got all her shots, and a microchip, and in January 2018, she got her hysterectomy.

So, on May 17, 2018, we spoke to the folks at the vet's office, who wanted us to meet Cali. Dr. J encouraged us to give Cali a "trial run" on the weekend of May 18th. Somewhat worried about "falling in love" again, we took the challenge. Poor Cali was petrified entering this apartment, especially when I let her out of her carrying case. Within a short while, with an odd "Twilight Zone" twist of irony, Cali discovered the only place where she could find comfort. It was under a small table in the corner of our front room---in the very space where Dante's bed had once been located, the very space where Dante died back in November. She stayed there all night. Until about 5 am... when I got up, and she and I met in the darkness and she was so startled she went speeding by me.

And then, she was gone.

Now, she could not have left the house; we had closed off the doors to two bedrooms and a storage room and she had nowhere to hide. Or so I thought. It was 12 hours later. I'd looked under every table, every piece of furniture, and even under the sink, where we have one of those carousel storage cabinets. No sign of her.

Another couple of hours passed. It was now around 8 pm. Surely this cat had to visit her litter box at some point. I mean, I know that I could not hold it in for 15 hours (let alone 15 minutes). So I checked under the sink again. And I suddenly saw two glowing eyes staring back at me. I talked in a high-pitched voice, "Come on, Cali, come on." And I went to fetch a flash light and returned---and she was gone again. I emptied the carousel of all its contents, and put my whole body under the sink---no small feat! And I discovered that there was this slit between the back of the cabinet and the wall. I got myself a mirror, and put the mirror diagonal to the slit, and I shined the flash light on the mirror. And there she was. God knows what was behind a slit that I never knew existed. And we've been living in this apartment for over 30 years! She wouldn't come out for anything. Not for food, water, or conversation.

I spoke to Dr. J and she suggested that we just leave the cabinet open and allow her to come out on her own. I took out a couple of old sheets, and a roll of duct tape, and told my sister: "If I should hear this cat in her litter box, then I'll know she will have left that little safe space, and I will race to the cabinet, stuff sheets in the slit, duct tape it shut, put everything back on the carousel, and duct tape the cabinet closed."

And so, sleeping lightly, I heard the scraping in that litter box. It was 4 o'clock in the morning, almost 24 hours from the time she had probably entered that space.

I raced to the kitchen to complete the mission of closing that hiding space. It was an exhausting 24-hour period.

When my sister got up for work a couple of hours later, I said to her: "Next time somebody offers us a new pet, slap my face!"

But it wasn't Cali's fault. After all, she had spent most of her life being bullied by her half-sister, and then when she came to the vet, she spent most of her life in a large cage, coming out to be nourished and nurtured, but still going back into that small space that was her home.

When she entered this apartment, with its seven rooms, it must have looked like a vast continent, too intimidating to explore. I'm happy to say that the trial period ended within about a week. Cali is now a new member of the Sciabarra family, and today, she has turned one year old. Happy birthday to Cali!

Cali_1.jpg

Cali Stretching Out After "Playtime"


Two weeks after her arrival, I joked to Dr. J: "Cali is like the Indominus Rex in 'Jurassic World': She is discovering what life is like beyond the enclosure she had lived in for so long, and I'm not sure we want to find out how mischievous she will be in figuring out where she sits in the house hierarchy."

Well, we're slowly discovering that she is vying to become Queen of the Castle. And who is going to argue with her?

Judging by how she has explored this new continent, making bottle caps, rubber bands, and tissues into toys, in addition to her regular array of playthings, it is clear that she is a very young, very healthy, and very energetic cat.

Cali_11crop.jpg

Cali: Diva In the Making


We'll probably have a makeshift cake for her tonight, made of the finest ingredients, and sing her a chorus of "Happy Birthday."

In any event, I've gotten so used to writing loving obituaries, that I thought it was time to speak of this new joy in our lives. May Cali live nine lives and more---providing us with the gift of her unique character, with health and vigor. She is already getting all the love her new family can give her in return.

Cali_2.jpg

Cali: Dog Tired After Her All-Night, In-House, Nocturnal Run

June 18, 2018

JARS: New July 2018 Issue

The new July 2018 issue of The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies will be on its way to subscribers shortly and should be accessible through JSTOR and Project Muse very soon.

In keeping with our policy of adding at least one new contributor to the JARS family with every new issue, we welcome two writers who have never appeared in our pages before: Shawn M. Carraher (who is among the co-writers of the lead-off essay) and Allison Gerard.

As we begin our eighteenth year of publication, we have now published the work of 161 writers---who have contributed a total of 346 essays (obviously some have contributed or co-authored more frequently than others). When this journal started in 1999, I didn't think I could have counted more than a couple of dozen people who might have contributed to a nonpartisan, interdisciplinary, biannual, double-blind peer-reviewed journal devoted to studying Ayn Rand and her times. To say that our output has exceeded our expectations is an understatement. And it is clear that our collaboration with Pennsylvania State University Press, since 2013, has increased our accessibility and visibility exponentially, as our journal's essays are now reaching thousands upon thousands of readers worldwide (in both print and electronic form)---in educational, business, government, and not-for-profit libraries and institutions. In addition, we are now abstracted and indexed by nearly two dozen prestigious abstracting and indexing services.

Here is the cover for the new July 2018 issue:

JARS_18_1_cover-front.jpg

Our Table of Contents includes the following essays (abstracts can be viewed here; and contributor biographies can be viewed here):
Developing an Instrument to Measure Objectivism - Eric B. Dent, John A. Parnell, and Shawn M. Carraher
Musing the Master's Tools to Dismantle the Master's House: The Fountainhead reads Doctor Faustus - Allison Gerard
Emigres on the October Revolution: The Suicide of Russia in the Novels of Ayn Rand and Mark Aldanov - Anastasiya Vasilievna Grigorovskaya
On Life and Value Within Objectivist Ethics - Kathleen Touchstone
Egoism and Others - Merlin Jetton
Not Enough Primary Categories in Peikoff's DIM? Salutary Eclecticism and An ACID Test - Roger E. Bissell
Reviews
Ayn Rand's Companions (A review of the Blackwell Companion to Ayn Rand, edited by Allan Gotthelf and Gregory Salmieri) - Fred Seddon
What Do We Need To Know? (A review of How We Know: Epistemology on an Objectivist Foundation by Harry Binswanger) - Robert L. Campbell

Finally, I'd like to alert those who are interested in submitting essays for consideration to visit our new interface, developed with the terrific assistance of Journals Managing Editor Astrid Meyer at Penn State Press. All essays should be submitted through Editorial Manager.

In the meanwhile, check out our new issue! And check out how to subscribe to the journal here.

June 17, 2018

Song of the Day #1583

Song of the Day: You're Looking Hot Tonight features the words and music of Barry Manilow, who celebrates his 75th birthday today. He opens his Vegas residency this weekend with concerts at Westgate Las Vegas. We've not officially started our Third Annual Summer Dance Party, but I figured it would be nice to post a rare 1983 dance track from Manilow. Check out the single version and then listen to the superior dance remix offered by Disconet [YouTube link].

June 10, 2018

Song of the Day #1582

Song of the Day: Dear Evan Hansen ("You Will Be Found"), words and music by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, is a musical highlight from this 2017 Tony Award-winning Best Musical. With lead vocals by Tony-Award winning "Best Actor in a Musical," Ben Platt, the song is an inspiring call to "let the sun come streaming in" when "the dark comes crashing through." Tonight, another musical will take the top award at the Tony Awards. For now, we can enjoy a gem from last year's winner, featured on the Broadway cast album [YouTube link].

June 09, 2018

John Hospers: On the Centenary of His Birth

Today, I posted on the Timeline of my "Facebook friend," John Hospers, who died on June 12, 2011. But it is on this date in 1918, that this gentle man was born, and it is in remembrance of his wisdom, sincerity, and warmth as a human being, that I celebrate the Centenary of his birth.

John was one of the most important figures in the formation of the modern libertarian movement. Yes, he was the first (and only) Libertarian Party presidential candidate to receive a single Electoral Vote (made by Roger MacBride, a renegade Republican from Virginia, who refused to cast his vote for Richard Nixon in 1972; MacBride, himself, would later go on to run for President on the LP line in 1976). But more importantly, he was the author of the monumental book, Libertarianism: A Political Philosophy for Tomorrow, not to mention a veritable library in philosophy, political theory, and social commentary.

On a personal level, I will always be thankful to John for having been among the very first scholars to offer praise for my book, Ayn Rand: The Russian Radical, and went on to become one of the first members of the Board of Advisors to The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, back in 1999. That journal was founded as the first nonpartisan double-blind peer-reviewed biannual periodical devoted to a discussion of Ayn Rand (with whom John Hospers once shared a friendship) and her times. And here we are still, on the precipice of the beginning of the eighteenth year of our publishing history, now a journal published by Pennsylvania State University Press. We could never have come so far if it were not for John's unwavering support for (and contributions to) the journal.

I will forever be indebted to this man for his accomplishments and his guidance. All the more reason to celebrate the Centenary of his birth and the joy that he brought to so many during his life.

Song of the Day #1581

Song of the Day: The Horse, words and music by Jesse James, was a million-selling #2 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 and R&B charts. It was technically the instrumental B-side of the 1968 single "Love is All Right" [YouTube link], by Cliff Nobles and Company. A slice of Philadelphia soul at its best, it boasts a horn section that went on to become the group MFSB. I provide this second "Song of the Day" for one reason only: Today, the Horse, Justify, vies for a place in Thoroughbred Racing History, looking for a win at the 150th running of the Belmont Stakes to take the Triple Crown. Go Justify! And check out this classic instrumental [YouTube link]. [Ed: And Justify becomes the 13th Horse in History, and only the second undefeated Thoroughbred, to win the Triple Crown!]

Song of the Day #1580

Song of the Day: Summer: The Donna Summer Musical ("Heaven Knows") features the words and music of Giorgio Moroder, Pete Bellotte, and Donna Summer, whose recording of this 1978 song (with the background vocals of The Brooklyn Dreams and lead vocals by Joe "Bean" Esposito) reached #4 on the Billboard Hot 100, #1 on the Billboard Dance Club Chart, and was a Top Ten R&B hit. The song, from Summer's album "Live and More", is also featured in "Summer: The Donna Summer Musical," which boasts two Tony nominations for Leading Actress and Featured Actress in a Musical (LaChange and Ariana DeBose, respectively, who play Donna at different points in her life). Check out the original Summer single, an alternative take with Esposito singing the lead vocal, the original 12" single version, the 12" Purrfection Version, and finally, "The MacArthur Park Suite," of which this song was a part (13:26 in the suite) [YouTube links].

June 08, 2018

Song of the Day #1579

Song of the Day: Broadway Gondolier ("Lulu's Back in Town"), words by Al Dubin, music by Harry Warren, is from the 1935 Warner Brothers film musical. Powell provides the vocals, with the Mills Brothers, for this song in the movie [YouTube link]. The song was also performed by Fats Waller, the Hi-Lo's with the Nelson Riddle Orchestra and in a swinging take by Mel Torme [YouTube links]. With the Tony Awards being broadcast on CBS on Sunday night, this is a Broadway weekend, even if this particular song didn't come from a Broadway show!

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