Margaret Sanger, "Introduction for I. N. Thurman," 6 Dec 1924.

Typed Draft Speech. Source: Margaret Sanger Papers, Library of Congress , Library of Congress Microfilm 130:703B .

Sanger gave this introduction at a birth control meeting held at Carnegie Hall in New York City. See her opening remarks and her introductions for James F. Cooper, Dorothy Bocker, and Charles Francis Potter.For another version, see LCM 131:60A.


I believe know that all of you must agree with me in my belief that such calm, dispassionate research as Dr. Bocker's work ↑statement↓ reveals will do much to awaken not only the interest and respect of the people of the community but to awaken and stimulate the interest of other scientists and physicians in the medical aspects of birth control.

Now I think that this is the most appropriate moment to announce a further victory for the American Birth Control League. I consider it a distinct victory to be able to announce to you tonight that the 6th International Neo-Malthusian and Birth Control Conference is to be held here in New York next March. This follows on the highly successful conferences held in Paris in 1901, in Liege in 1905, the Hague in 1910, in Dresden, 1911 and London 1922.

For the first time in its history the foremost authorities on the problems of population are coming from every civilized country of the world as our guests.

All of you who have shown your interest in this subject by coming here tonight may take advantage of this great educational opportunity to see and hear our eminent speakers in the various sessions.

We have already invited a large number of men preeminent in their chosen fields*- men like John Maynard Keynes, the economist, Sir Ray Lankester, the great English scientist; Lord Buckmaster, probably the finest legal mind in Great Britain; Professor MacBride the well known biologist of London University; Edward Westermarck, renowned as a profound student of the institution of marriage; men like H. G. Wells, Bernard Shaw and Arnold Bennett. There are already acceptances of delegates from Hungary, Austria, Germany, France from the Orient, India, and Japan.

The sessions during these five days will be a sort of temporary university on all the deep problems of civilization- opening new vistas into the whole future of the human race. Nothing so wide in its scope has ever happened in this country before.

But I am taking time from our next speaker who is going to tell you something of the legal status of birth control. He will also tell you something more of this conference and how we can all cooperate to make it a great success in the eyes of the world. It gives me real pleasure to introduce to you Mr. I. N. Thurman.


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Copyright 2003. Margaret Sanger Project


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