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Courses - Fall 2014

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Fall 2014 courses with days and times will be available in Albert, NYU's Student Information System the week of March 31, 2014. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students must participate in Global Orientations. Students do not need to enroll for this course during registration.
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check your syllabi! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • If you're wait-listing, don't forget to Swap. More information on wait-listing is available here.
  • Certain Business, Economics, Math, and Psychology courses have prerequisites, visiting students email global.academics@nyu.edu for permission.
  • Some Stern (Business) courses are restricted to Stern students only until Friday of registration week. Non-Stern students will be able to register beginning Friday.
  • Registration in the Gallatin Fashion courses is given to students in the Gallatin Fashion Program. Other students will be permitted to register as space remains available.
  • Internship Seminar & Fieldwork is a permission only class. Students needed to apply ahead of time for this course. This course is full and no longer accepting applications.
  • More information about Registering for Study Away Courses and registration FAQ's is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu

Fall 2014 | Spring 2015 | Fall 2015 | Spring 2016 | Fall 2016

 

Required Course for All Students

We often hear that Britain is a global country and London is a global city, but what does this mean? In recent years Britain has undergone striking changes in its social makeup, political outlook and cultural activities. Rapid change also brings tensions around housing, the National Health Service and education all of which are increasingly facing pressures from immigration, larger numbers of unemployed and the economic squeeze. The most recent census suggested Polish was the second is spoken language in Britain. So what is happening and why and how does it affect you as a visiting student?

Global Orientation: British Culture is intended to introduce students to ideas formed by global and local issues and focus on concerns regarding politics, the media, migration, the free market, foreign policy, cultural homogeneity and democracy that are the keys to modern British national identity.
The course in based around a series of lectures and talks by prominent speakers from British politics, culture, economics and the arts, and incorporates various optional excursions into London to see some of what is being talked about in action.

Sample Syllabus

Sample 2


Africana Studies

This course negotiates the complex range of influences that construct black culture and identity in Britain today from socio-cultural, historical, geo-political and aesthetic standpoints. The changing conceptions of Black British identity (and its detractors), is explored in a cross-disciplinary curriculum which attempts to straddle the perhaps irresolvable division between the recognition of cultural differences and the refusal of marginalization, as played out in the urban context, namely London. Key areas of investigation include: representation via literature, drama, film, television, music, sport and the visual arts and the ways in which these areas are shaped by and shape black citizens’ experiences of society’s institutions through the media, education, criminal justice system and the arts. As an indicative rather than definitive hold-all, or framing device, the use of the term ‘Black British’ follows the Parekh Report’s lead, that ‘belonging is about full acceptance, being recognized as an integral part of the community’ (2000:54). The course assumes automatic cultural constituency for indigenous black Britons as they belong to and contribute distinctively to contemporary society. It moves beyond centring inheritance in terms of the immigrant or arrivalist sensibility in order to explore Britain’s unique manifestation of the African diaspora as sited firmly within contemporary Europe. The breadth of the course aims to: introduce students to cultural criticism and theory, apply this to Black Urban Studies in the British context and encourage research into a wider range of questions that will arise from investigating the above.

Sample Syllabus


Africana Studies (The School of Oriental and Africana  Studies, University of London)

Read more about the SOAS Africana Studies programme here. (Please note that SOAS courses outside of this selection are not open to NYU London students, and students on the NYU London program cannot enroll directly in University of London courses.)

This course provides students with knowledge of the diverse literatures composed and written in indigenous languages of Africa, as well as of the general issues relevant to the study of this literature. The languages covered include Swahili (East Africa), Hausa and Yoruba (Nigeria and West Africa), Xhosa (Southern Africa), and Somali (Horn of Africa). The literature is discussed largely according to major genre types, such as poetry and song, oral narratives, and written prose literature. No knowledge of these languages is required for the course. 

An introduction to thinking about the human faculty of language within a specifically African context. The course focuses on issues of language within the framework of human society at all levels, and not so much on language as a structural entity. Topics include the general characteristics of human language; the description of the languages of Africa; the question of language and cultural contact in Africa; and the contemporary issues of language and sociopolitics in Africa. 

The course familiarizes students with a selection of the varying perspectives from which African experience has been perceived, analyzed, and interpreted, primarily by Africans and persons of African descent, both on the continent and in the diaspora. 

The course examines not only the common concerns but also the diverse traditions, as a result of historical, social, and cultural imperatives, that have informed the literature produced by African writers. Topics include colonialism; the question of language; race and identity; nationalism and literature; modernity; exile; and the politics of gender in the African context. 

The aim of the course is to introduce students to cultural dimensions in Africa, and to ways of approaching the study of culture in Africa. It focuses on three overall themes: orality, performance and identity, exploring ways in which these find expression primarily (though not exclusively) through language, religious belief, music, literature, nationalism, and popular culture. After presenting a general theoretical framework for the study of the themes, it concentrates on specific cultural contexts, illustrated with "case studies". Students are also encouraged to do further reading within other culture areas of Africa and the African Diaspora. 


Art History

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

The principal aim of this course is to familiarize students with the history of British art from the Stuarts to the early Victorian era. Teaching will be conducted entirely on sites in London or its immediate vicinity. The course will begin with the elite patronage of the Stuart court and end with the development of public institutions of art from the mid-eighteenth century. The social significance of portraiture, the cult of antiquity, the art market and the rise of landscape will all be studied as themes. There will be a strong emphasis on the European sources of British visual culture and the emergence of a distinctive national tradition of painting from Hogarth through to Turner.

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

London has some of the richest collections of renaissance art in the world. Students in this course will be brought into direct contact with a large variety of artefacts to be found in museums and galleries such as the National Gallery, the National Portrait Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the British Museum as well as the British Library. Works by Van Eyck, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Durer and Holbein will be examined alongside those of less well-known artists. Rather than provide a standard chronological narrative of European Art History c. 1400- c. 1600, focus will be placed on subject areas such as the altarpiece and the private devotional image, the renaissance portrait, graphic practices, print culture, the materials and functions of sculpture, myth and allegory, the cabinet of curiosities, the concept of the 'Renaissance' itself. These topics will not be organised around traditional national or regional 'schools' considered in isolation from one another but instead interconnections will be explored between the development of different types, technical processes and cultural practices across the Netherlands, France, Germany and Italy. A special case will be made of the English Renaissance, in order to place it within the wider European context through additional visits to Westminster Abbey and Hampton Court. 

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History Elective credit & Urban Design credit.

British architecture is studied, from the Roman remains to the Post-Modern ITV Studios in London. Architecture, urban systems, preservation, and planning issues will be studied. While examining the past and present, the future of architecture will also be explored with an emphasis on the importance of renovating and refurbishing old buildings. There will be site visits in and around the City.

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Architecture and Urban Design credit only.

London, like New York is a rich and complicated city. Unlike New York however, it has been continuously occupied for just under 2000 years. Almost every epoch of London’s history can be detected in the city’s architecture and distinctive streetscape.

This course is designed to work in three ways. Firstly it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and art by physically exploring it. Secondly this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a basic and useful skill that any liberal arts student should have an experience of. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, this course teaches how to 'read' a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of European built-environment should really help in understanding the architecture of New York City and, of course, town and cities throughout the United States, and anywhere else. 

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

Contemporary art raises vigorous debate and criticism. But what is contemporary about contemporary art? This course introduces you to some of the key issues in dealing critically with contemporary art with a focus on work on display in exhibitions in London, both major national collections and private galleries. The course explores art produced since the late 1950s through case studies of the work of individual artists and through themes which include photography; representations of the body; gallery display; migration, visual imagery of political issues, video practice and installation art. Among other things we consider how contemporary art came to look as it does [with a focus on British art]; the different forms of material and presentation artists have employed; why and how diverse audiences are addressed; how markets, national prizes and private collections shape the kinds of art produced and inform public taste. We also look at the collection and display of contemporary art, on a private and a public scale; dealer galleries and issues of curation.

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Architecture and Urban Design credit only

Re-cycling or re-using buildings is one of the most important subjects in the built environment. It is an area in which there have been some remarkable successes in recent years both in America and in Europe: impressive and much loved public buildings have been given new life by progressive architects and developers, helping ensure that our towns and cities retain their individual character. Unlike international modern buildings, historic buildings are strong markers of the industry, aspirations, local materials and the resources of a particular place. Recycling old buildings is crucial so our architectural and social history can be read in the townscape that surrounds us.A course about recycling old buildings presents an opportunity to explore some basic themes in the built environment – architecture history, environmental issues and the rise of the conservation movement in the 19th and 20th centuries. Buildings are responsible for 50% of our carbon emissions each year, and more than half of a building’s energy footprint is expended in the relatively short spell of its construction. ‘Even the best planned new buildings are no match against the preservation, modernization, conversion and re-use of existing buildings when it comes down to the consumption of resources’ (Karl Ganser) Re-using our redundant historic architecture for new purposes has obvious positive benefits for the planet. Equally, upgrading historic buildings in use, like our housing stock, is environmentally smarter that demolishing parts of our cities and starting again with new structures.The locations and nature of industrial production has changed across the world. Most western cities have a surfeit of industrial spaces and buildings lying empty, often in their centres. This course will first cover the story of the development of industrial architecture from the 18th century onwards and look at how these robust, proud and often highly decorative structures can accommodate new uses. We will look at how inventive designers, backed by local government, have found ways of reclaiming the industrial ‘brownfield’ landscapes into new spaces for recreation and development in our cities, focusing on particular examples in New York, London and in Germany.

Sample Syllabus

*Important note for students in the Art History Department: This course does not satisfy requirements for the major or minor in Art History or Urban Design.  

Please note that this course is currently under development. Actual course description may vary.

The course is designed as an introduction to museum studies through the study of London Museums. We will cover the types and definitions of museums, using key London collections, such as the British Museum and the Tate as well as smaller collections such as the Wallace Collection.

The course will introduce contemporary theories and practices in museology, examine how collections evolve, interrogate the role of individual collectors, study the specific character of the permanent and temporary exhibitions, and discuss the relationship between museums, cultures, and society. We will examine current issues in the museum profession as it faces the future of museums in the twenty-first century.


Biology

Prerequisite: General Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 125) or Advanced General Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 127). AP or any other advanced standing credit in chemistry is not an acceptable prerequisite.

Students registering for this course must also register for Lecture & Recitation.

Introductory course for Science majors designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles and processes of biological systems. Subjects include the basics of chemistry pertinent to biology, biochemistry and cell biology, genetics and molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, neurobiology, ecology, population genetics and history and classification of life forms and evolution. Laboratory exercises illustrate the basics of experimental biology, molecular biology and biochemistry as well as the diversity of life forms and organ systems.

Sample Syllabus


Business

Prerequisites: (1) STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Models OR STAT-UB 1 Statistics for Business Control (4 credit) plus STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) OR equivalent AND (2) one of the following: ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics OR ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II, OR ECON-UA 5 Introduction to Economic Analysis, AND (3) ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting AND (4) At least Sophomore Standing.

A rigorous course developing the basic concepts and tools of modern finance. Basic concepts of return and risk are explored in detail with a view to understanding how financial markets work and how different kinds of financial instruments are valued. These instruments, including equities, fixed income securities, options, and other derivative securities become vehicles for exploring various financial markets and the utilization of these markets by managers in different kinds of financial institutions to enhance return and manage risk. The course includes a segment on the use and application of computer-based quantitative technology for financial modeling purposes.

Sample Syllabus

This course is only open to Stern BPE Students.

This course provides students with an overview of the theoretical traditions inspiring current research in international relations (IR). IR is a discipline which attempts to explain processes and events in world politics. Primarily emerging as a way to explain the behaviour of nation-states and their interactions, the discipline has expanded with the onset of globalization to explore an array of actors, institutions and processes which include but simultaneously transcend the nation-state.

The course will focus on the major theories of IR, and how theoretical debates inform key literature in major subfields of the discipline. The course is constructed in such a way as to familiarize students with core debates and cleavages in the field, for example between behavioural and ideological approaches to the study of world politics. There will also be a focus on some of the key substantive subfields of IR such as international organisations, humanitarian intervention, and global governance. Students will be encouraged to explore the efficacy of different theoretical approaches in explaining phenomena in world politics.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Foundations of Finance (FINC-UB 2) and Statistics or equivalents.

The class focuses on the nature of financial management from a number of perspectives including the national, the corporate and the individual, but particularly the corporate. You will become familiar with the financial system, including that relating to banking, though there will be little overlap with courses that deal with the functioning of financial markets. The importance of behavioural finance will also be stressed during the course. 

Sample Syllabus

Investigates the nature, functions, and responsibilities of the management of organizations. Develops an analytical approach to the identification, structuring, analysis, and solution of organizational problems. Introduces the student to organizational policies and structures, functional areas, and production processes (including resource allocation, measurement and evaluation, and control), leadership style, and organizational adaptation and evolution. Teaching methodologies include lectures, case analysis, and class discussion.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Analysis (or BOTH STAT-UB 1 and STAT-UB 3) OR equivalent.

Companies seek to gain and then maintain competitive advantage so that they can maximize the wealth of their stakeholders. They use their operations to gain competitive advantage by obtaining cost leadership or parity; consistent quality superiority; shorter time to market; responsiveness and adaptability to customer needs and desires; sufficient capacity; utilization of innovative process and product technology; and ensuring environmental neutrality. This course touches briefly on all of the above competitive advantages whilst consistently stressing a problem-solving approach.

Sample Syllabus

This course carries an additional fee of £20 to cover the cost of course materials.

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Sample Syllabus

This course is only open to juniors and seniors.

The Law, Business and Society course builds on prior coursework within the Social Impact Core Curriculum by challenging students to think about legal systems and appreciate how they have evolved and continue to evolve in relation to business and society. The interaction between law and business is multi-dimensional involving social, political, ethical and technological considerations. Students will examine how key areas of business law influence the structure of domestic and international business relationships, while honing their analytical, communication, conflict resolution and team problem solving skills. The students will learn how businesses play an active role in shaping the very laws that govern them through lobbying, public relations and the media.

Sample Syllabus Coming Soon

Students learn how organizations communicate with multiple types of audiences, focusing on the interconnections between business and society. The course uses the stakeholder model of the corporation to introduce the strategic implications of communication for modern organizations. Students focus on strategic and tactical aspects of corporate communication to study and practice the ways in which organizations communicate to their varied internal and external stakeholders. Assignments develop students? abilities in speaking and writing to these varied audiences, both to inform and to persuade. The course emphasizes bridging theoretical fundamentals, and action learning is stressed, which includes applying communication strategy to the following: oral and written business assignments; presentation delivery techniques; visual communication analysis and practice; team communication.

Sample Syllabus


Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM-UA 102 College Chemistry II or its equivalent.

Students registering for this course must register for lecture, laboratory, and recitation.

An introduction to the chemistry of organic compounds, the course is presented in the functional group framework incorporating reaction mechanisms. Topics include structure and bonding of organic materials, nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, and spectroscopy (IR, NMR, UV/visible, and mass spectroscopy). 

Laboratory provides training in the basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory, including crystallization, distillation, extraction, and other separation techniques such as column chromatography and gas chromatography. Experiments involving the synthesis of organic compounds are introduced as well as those performing qualitative organic analysis.

Sample Lecture Syllabus

Sample Lab Syllabus


Cinema Studies

Students registering for this class must also register for the Screenings section.

This course carries an additional fee of £20 to cover the cost of course materials.

This course provides an exciting and challenging introduction to British Cinema, studying the rich and varied relationships between the society and its films. It is organised in four main parts, offering an Introduction to Film Studies; a look at National Identity and the Cinema in relation to England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the UK as a whole; case studies in key authors Mike Leigh and Ken Loach; and approaches to narrative and genre.

Sample Syllabus


College Core Curriculum

This class introduces students to an in-depth academic study of changing views of British national identity and culture, using a variety of primary and secondary sources. Britain is a multi-national state, a union of 4 nations, each with their own distinctive culture and heritage. Three of the nations, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, have been brought under the English monarchy and political system, and, in the case of the first two, they have been long-term partners in the benefits accruing to the largest empire the world has seen, and the first and (for a long time) the most successful industrial nation. The height of that unity was probably in the period of the Second World War and its aftermath. Since then, with the collapse of the British Empire, Britain’s membership of the European Union, and the devolution of power to Scotland and Wales, the union has come under increasing pressure from centrifugal forces. The course examines the image that Britain presents to the world, the myths on which the national identity of the component nations were formed and the institutions that might be considered to hold the union together today. This involves looking at the self-image of Britain in relation to empire, foreign policy, immigration and multiculturalism, monarchy, parliament, sport and media representations. British national identity is revealed as an increasingly contested concept in a globalised world.

Sample Syllabus



Creative Writing

Beginning workshop in creative writing designed to explore and refine the student's individual writing interests. This course may include fiction and/or poetry and creative non-fiction. 

Sample Syllabus


Dramatic Literature

Students registering for this course must also register for the theatre visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of approximately $495 in Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 to cover the cost of theatre tickets (exact amount will be reflected on tuition bill for the semester).

The course examines the main features of modern drama from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Each week there is a theatre visit to see plays from the period in a number of different venues across the city: for example, the National Theatre, the Royal Court, selected West End houses, non-theatre spaces converted for performance, and site specific locations. The productions are chosen to illustrate the immense variety of work produced in theatre during the twentieth century and current today. They also provide excellent examples of contemporary techniques in theatre making, ranging from interpretations of traditional dramas and comedies, new writing, physical theatre, musicals, cross media pieces, and other alternative forms. Significant aspects of modern drama are also considered in class through examples on DVDs, examination of critical reviews, and analysis of additional texts where appropriate. 

Sample Syllabus

Students registering for this class must also register for the Theatre Visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of approximately $263 in Fall 2016 and Sppring 2017 to cover the cost of theatre tickets (exact amount will be reflected on tuition bill for the semester).

This course provides an introduction to the dramatic work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Students read and attend representative comedies, tragedies, and histories, their selection to be determined by the plays actually in production in and around London, particularly at the Barbican, New Globe, and Stratford to which at least one excursion will be made. Special attention will be given to the playhouses and the influence they had on the art of the theatre, actors' companies, and modes of production and performance. Lectures and discussions will focus on the aesthetic quality of the plays, their relationship with the audiences (then and now), the application of the diverse attitudes and assumptions of modern critical theory to the Elizabethan stage, the contrasting structures of Shakespearean and non-Shakespearean drama, the new emphasis on selfhood and individuality, and the major themes of hierarchy, order, and justice, the conflict of Nature and Fortune, the role of Providence, the ideals of love, and the norms of social accord. Opportunities will be given to investigate the interrelations of the plays and other arts, including film, opera, and ballet. 

Sample Syllabus


Economics

Prerequisites for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) and Mathematics for Economics II (MATH-UA 212). Restriction only for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: not open to seniors.

Prerequisites for students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) and Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Mathematics for Economics I (MATH-UA 211).

Not open to NYU Stern students.

The aim of the course is to provide students with a thorough understanding of the core concepts and methods of microeconomics. The course can serve as a foundation for more advanced undergraduate electives which require a microeconomics background. Students will develop their understanding of economic models specified in standard mathematical and/or game theoretic terms. Course content includes core topics of consumption, production, and decision-making by firms (both with and without market power) as well as the analysis of market failure due to public goods and externalities. The core also includes an introduction to decision making under conditions of uncertainty. These topics are analyzed more deeply and more rigorously than in introductory principles courses. Depending on time available, the course will cover a selection of further topics. These include some or all of: asymmetric information, general equilibrium, and behavioral economics. Because this course caters to the policy concentration stream, the level of mathematics is somewhat lower than it would be on the theory concentration, and the course will make extensive use of diagrams and stress the intuition of results. Nevertheless, intermediate microeconomics is rigorous and analytical. The calculus prerequisite is there for a reason and students will need to be familiar with basic differentiation, including partial differentiation. While the level of mathematics is not advanced, all students of intermediate microeconomics must be prepared for some mathematical analysis. 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10). Restriction only for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: not open to seniors.

Prerequisites for students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1), Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), and Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Mathematics for Economics I (MATH-UA 211).  

Why did the global economy find itself on the edge of a precipice in 2008, why did free markets fail so spectacularly, how well did governments and central banks cope, are we out of the woods? This course seeks to equip students with the basic analytical and practical skills necessary to begin answering such fundamental questions.

As an academic discipline, Macroeconomics has been heavily criticised in recent years: for not predicting the 2007-onwards credit crunch; for using simplistic, out-of-date models; for ignoring data that challenged stylised theories; and for failing to acknowledge that economic theory has little to offer without a clear, socio-political and historical context.

Our principal objective is to counter some of these criticisms, not by reinventing the wheel but rather by introducing key contemporary issues and seeing what insights we can gain by applying relevant and appropriate macro analysis. A core objective of this course is to show that Macroeconomics, carefully and intelligently deployed, can offer helpful insights for addressing society’s key challenges in the 21st century. 

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5) or equivalents.

The principal characteristics of the financial system and its current challenges; derivatives, financial innovation and the banking industry; money supply and monetary policy; bonds, equities and interest rates; financial supervision and regulation; pricing of financial securities and balanced portfolios; foreign exchange and how currency markets impact policy and asset choices; international policy co-ordination; banking crises and reform programmes.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) or equivalents.

This course focuses on international trade in goods, services, and capital. It serves as an introduction to international economic issues and as preparation for the department’s more advanced course in ECON-UA 324. The issues discussed include gains from trade and their distribution; analysis of protectionism; strategic trade barriers; the trade deficit; exchange rate determination and government intervention in foreign exchange markets.

Sample Syllabus (Please note that there are different sections of this course which use different text books. Please wait to hear from NYU London or your Professor about which book to buy. Do not base your purchase off of this sample syllabus)


English

On Christmas Day, 1764 Horace Walpole published The Castle of Otranto, the very first Gothic novel. The Gothic flourished especially in the nineteenth century, creating a whole vocabulary of new creatures and landscapes and two of the great books of the genre: Frankenstein And Dracula. This course concentrates on the great works of Gothic which are central to an understanding of literature, film, early Romanticism and popular culture. Specialising on the works of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries we will also explore how those texts were reinvented for film and what new elements were added in the twentieth century. Using a selection of texts and using a variety of approaches from the historical to the post modern and the feminist to queer theory we will explore the multifarious levels of meaning in Gothic texts as well as looking at narrative strategies and a variety of themes including the political and revolutionary, the erotic and the exotic, the Promethian and the undead, the role of religion, the role of women, the Wandering Jew and the 'mock' medieval.

This course features authors and texts with significant literary ‘afterlives’ that have persisted to the contemporary moment – Shakespeare, Jane Austen and Charles Dickens to name a few – with a view towards encouraging students to seek out the origins of iconic narratives. As such, this course allows students to engage at length with some of the most beloved and renowned authors in British literary history, but it also challenges them to reconsider preconceptions they may hold about certain authors or texts. Along with a few novels, we shall complement each literary era with relevant poetry, and we will also read three plays, including Harold Pinter's No Man's Land, which we will then see performed live in London. Other excursions include the Dickens House Museum and the Geffrye Museum.

Sample Syllabus

Students registering for this course must also register for the theatre visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of approximately $495 in Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 to cover the cost of theatre tickets (exact amount will be reflected on tuition bill for the semester).

The course examines the main features of modern drama from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Each week there is a theatre visit to see plays from the period in a number of different venues across the city: for example, the National Theatre, the Royal Court, selected West End houses, non-theatre spaces converted for performance, and site specific locations. The productions are chosen to illustrate the immense variety of work produced in theatre during the twentieth century and current today. They also provide excellent examples of contemporary techniques in theatre making, ranging from interpretations of traditional dramas and comedies, new writing, physical theatre, musicals, cross media pieces, and other alternative forms. Significant aspects of modern drama are also considered in class through examples on DVDs, examination of critical reviews, and analysis of additional texts where appropriate. 

Sample Syllabus

This course will study a variety of texts written at particular times in the history of London. The aims of the course are to encourage student to think historically, in terms of the way London and representations of the city have changed and developed over time; and theoretically, in terms of the way the city is mediated through different forms and genres (e.g. poetry, novels, essays, film). We will also examine the texts in relation to issues such as gender, the definition of the modern metropolis as a labyrinthine city of Babylon, the influence of metropolitan culture on Modernism and Modernity, assimilation versus multiculturalism, immigration, and the effects of new modern spaces on individuals.

Students registering for this class must also register for the Theatre Visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of approximately $263 in Fall 2016 and Sppring 2017 to cover the cost of theatre tickets (exact amount will be reflected on tuition bill for the semester).

This course provides an introduction to the dramatic work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Students read and attend representative comedies, tragedies, and histories, their selection to be determined by the plays actually in production in and around London, particularly at the Barbican, New Globe, and Stratford to which at least one excursion will be made. Special attention will be given to the playhouses and the influence they had on the art of the theatre, actors' companies, and modes of production and performance. Lectures and discussions will focus on the aesthetic quality of the plays, their relationship with the audiences (then and now), the application of the diverse attitudes and assumptions of modern critical theory to the Elizabethan stage, the contrasting structures of Shakespearean and non-Shakespearean drama, the new emphasis on selfhood and individuality, and the major themes of hierarchy, order, and justice, the conflict of Nature and Fortune, the role of Providence, the ideals of love, and the norms of social accord. Opportunities will be given to investigate the interrelations of the plays and other arts, including film, opera, and ballet. 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: ENGL-UA 220:British Literature II

Students will undertake a study of the culture, thought and literary production of England between the Crimean War (1853-6) and the First World War (1914-8).  Looking at a selection of poems, novels and short stories alongside visual representations and non-fiction texts, this course explores a range of significant contemporary discourses relating to gender, sexuality, religion, class, race and empire. Attention to historical context will combine with detailed textual analysis to reveal how the transition from Victorian to Modern involved stylistic and thematic continuities as well as discontinuities and dislocations. Taking advantage of our local surroundings, we will also consider changing representations of London, Imperial capital, and trace the enduring legacy of this period in the twenty-first-century city.

 


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in London Program will be given registration priority for this course.

This course offers a survey of key aspects of British fashion from 1500 to the present day, including womenswear, menswear, accessories, and more. We will examine selected features of producing, consuming, and representing dress, relating important shifts in fashion to historical developments in areas such as trade, economics, politics, and visual culture. Students will study examples of historical clothing as well as depictions of it, and become familiar with a variety of methodological approaches to its study. The majority of classes will take place in Bedford Square, London, and be formed of illustrative lectures, class activities, discussion of set readings, and student presentations. Each lecture is described in the syllabus and includes discussion questions, required as well as recommended readings, and recommended films. Several classes will take place on location, at museums and archives, and will explore important collections of British dress and of British everyday life and fashionable consumption.

Sample Syllabus

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in London Program will be given registration priority for this course.

This is a course that explores the relationship between ideas, the body and the way that fashion can be understood to mediate between the two. Through a range of disciplines and media this course considers the body as an aspect of not only medical and scientific exploration, but crucially as a vital element of culture and society. Bodies affect the ways in which the social world and power relations are organised, and they even arguably condition the way that we understand reality itself. Our physical form is constantly shaped according to both philosophies and fashions. Body ideals and broader ideals often interrelate strongly through bodily practices and with what we wear. There are meanings and fashions in all bodily forms (skinny, buxom, muscular, ideas of ‘whiteness’) and body practices (dieting, hair management, cleansing rituals, plastic surgery and genital cutting).

Over the sessions, we will take a conceptual approach to fashion, as a strident condition of modern life, that incorporates politics, science and aesthetics and we will closely read a number of cultural texts against a number of theoretical models. Attitudes towards the body can vary widely according to historical period, and this course will explore how, in different moments, and via different media, we have been preoccupied with the aesthetics of different body zones, with displaying identity (gender, class and ethnicity), and also with power. Different cultural forms (literary, visual, material etc) will provide the focus of our discussions as they all engage with the different ways that we make meaning out of our bodies. Students will be invited to investigate in their written work set texts from class in addition to primary material of their own choice.

 

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in London Program will be given registration priority for this course.

The Global Fashion Industry and British Fashion aims to introduce fashion history and theory in its contemporary social and cultural context. The course will examine various aspects of the fashion industry and offer an understanding of critical concepts such as social identity, consumer culture and globalization. Students will explore aspects of the British fashion industry, including fashion media, retail environments, fashion exhibitions and the impact of sub and counter culture.

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Architecture and Urban Design credit only.

London, like New York is a rich and complicated city. Unlike New York however, it has been continuously occupied for just under 2000 years. Almost every epoch of London’s history can be detected in the city’s architecture and distinctive streetscape.

This course is designed to work in three ways. Firstly it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and art by physically exploring it. Secondly this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a basic and useful skill that any liberal arts student should have an experience of. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, this course teaches how to 'read' a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of European built-environment should really help in understanding the architecture of New York City and, of course, town and cities throughout the United States, and anywhere else. 

Sample Syllabus

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

Note: Students accepted to this course must indicate on their Student Information Form that they want a Tier-4 General Student Visa; you will not be permitted to intern (paid or unpaid) in the UK without a Tier-4 visa.A Tier-4 visa costs a minimum of £310 GBP (approximately $527 USD), plus any applicable shipping and expedite fees.

Enrollment by permission only.  Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and minimum of 16 hours fieldwork per week.  Internship placements are made by EUSA, an organization partnering with NYU. EUSA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus



Global Public Health

Please note that this course is currently under development.  Actual course description may vary.

By the end of this course students will develop the ability to understand the evolution and current role of epidemiology as an approach to assessing public health problems; describe epidemiological approaches to defining and measuring health problems in defined populations; understand how epidemiologic studies are designed, implemented and analyzed; understand the concepts of measurement of test performance and be able to apply these concepts of testing and screening in a range of health and other settings; understand and apply epidemiological criteria needed to establish cause and effect relationships; understand, and apply key ethical issues to the conduct of epidemiological and other scientific investigations; conduct library research to find information on diseases and other health conditions; and critically read and understand health information.

Sample Syllabus

Please note that this course is currently under development.  Actual course description may vary.

This course will examine the various dimensions of the field of public health and how the public’s health is protected. Students explore the ways social, economic, and political forces influence the health of populations. Additionally, this course will focus upon some of the current ethical public health dilemmas where the rights of the individual versus the rights of society come into conflict. The course makes use of diverse methods of instruction, including, but not limited to, small group discussion, group exercises, mini-lectures, student debates, field-based group projects and student presentations. Students may be involved in gathering information and observations from projects outside of the classroom at government, NGO and health care institutions.


History

A survey of Europe from 1789 to the present. Investigates the political, social, economic, and cultural developments that shaped and continue to shape the modern age. Emphasis is on the evolution of the nation-state, on industrialization and its impact on society and politics, and on the intellectual responses to the rapid changes these developments inspired. Topics include Europe and the French Revolution; the rise of the nation-state, 1848-1914; and the impact of totalitarian ideologies on 20th-century Europe.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores the origins of Islam and the development of its rituals and doctrines to the 21st century. It assumes no previous background in Islamic studies. Students will learn about topics such as the Koran and the Prophet, Islamic law, the encounter of East and West during the Crusades, and Islam in Britain. They will find out how Muslims in different regions have interpreted and lived their religion in past and present. Readings will include not only scholarly works but also material from primary sources, for example the Koran, biographies and chronicles. The course consists of a combination of lectures, seminar discussions, field trips and includes other media, such as film. 

Sample Syllabus

*Please Note: Does not count toward the major or minor in Middle Eastern Studies.

Covers the impact of World War II, the postwar division of Europe, the onset of the cold war, the economic recovery and transformation of Western Europe, Stalinism in Eastern Europe, the 1960s and events of 1968, the origins and development of the European community, and the cultural and intellectual life of European nations in this period. Ends with a discussion of the Eastern European revolutions of 1989 and their significance, together with the reunification of Germany, for the future of the continent. 

Sample Syllabus

This course will focus on a history of Modern Imperialism from the beginning of the nineteenth century to post-Second World War decolonisation: with particular reference to the British Empire.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines the growth and importance of London from the Roman invasion of 43 AD to the present day. Students will learn about London’s changing economic and political role, and will understand how London grew to dominate the commerce, industry and culture of England. They will find out how London became the biggest city the world had ever known, and how it coped (or failed to cope) with the social and environmental problems created by its enormous size. The classroom sessions will be divided between a lecture and a class discussion. From week two onwards the class will begin with a discussion of the topic or period covered in the previous week‚s lecture, in which students will be expected to use knowledge and ideas gathered from lectures and from their weekly reading. There will also be four walking tours of parts of London which relate to the period we are studying at a particular time.

Sample Syllabus

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines the place that slavery played in Britain's past and its legacy today. In the eighteenth century, Britain prided itself on the liberty enjoyed by its people, yet it was the largest participant in the Atlantic slave trade, and grew rich on the wealth created by ports such as London, Bristol and Liverpool. In the same period some 15,000 black people lived in English ports and their presence has only recently been properly acknowledged. In the nineteenth century, however, Britain perceived itself as in the forefront of the global battle to end the slave trade and slavery itself. This pioneering campaign contributed to a more positive sense of British national identity. Yet Britain continued to depend on the importation of slave-grown produce and even began to ship hundreds of thousands of Indians as virtual slaves to many parts of the world. The ambivalent legacy of Britain’s past involvement with slavery remains important to Britain's multi-cultural identity and its global role today. 

Sample Syllabus


Internship for Credit

Note: Students accepted to this course must indicate on their Student Information Form that they want a Tier-4 General Student Visa; you will not be permitted to intern (paid or unpaid) in the UK without a Tier-4 visa.A Tier-4 visa costs a minimum of £310 GBP (approximately $527 USD), plus any applicable shipping and expedite fees.

Enrollment by permission only.  Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and minimum of 16 hours fieldwork per week.  Internship placements are made by EUSA, an organization partnering with NYU. EUSA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus



Journalism & Mass Communication

Students in this course must also register for the Methods and Practice Theatre visit in the evenings.

This course carries an additional fee of approximately $356 in Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 to cover the cost of theatre tickets (exact amount will be reflected on tuition bill for the semester). Students should also be prepared to pay up to £100 (approximately $150) for extra tickets while in London as part of the Methods & Practice course.

Using the cultural life of London as its focus, this course aims to enable students to report on the diversity of cultural and artistic activity in the British capital across the spectrum, with an inevitable focus on theatre and live performance (classical music/opera, classical and contemporary dance) given the professor's own ongoing career as a theatre critic; other art forms, including art, television, and film, are considered, as well, depending on what is on in the capital at any given time. Numerous forms and techniques will be explored through la mixture of lecture, discussion, and student presentations, and students will be required to follow the work of several critics throughout the term even as they develop their own critical voice and methodology. At every turn, the course aims to wed the specific cultural goings-on in London during the semester to the methods and practice necessary to respond to and evaluate the work on offer.

Sample Syllabus

Designed to interrogate the impact of various forms of media on "society" and various notions of society on "media." Students consider conventional and unconventional media in Britain - from the London Times to movies to fashion magazines - in an effort to interpret British culture. The key question is not "Is this text 'good'?" but "What does this text mean?"

Sample Syllabus 


Mathematics

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH-UA 121 Calculus I or the equivalent.

This is an introductory course on linear algebra, one of the most important and basic areas of mathematics, with many real-life applications. The course introduces students to both the theory of vector spaces and linear transformations and the techniques such as row-reduction of matrices and diagonalisation, which can be applied to problems in areas such as engineering, economics, and mathematical biology.

As well as mastering techniques, it is important that the students get to grips with the more abstract ideas of linear algebra, and learn to understand and write correct mathematical arguments. Taking an active approach to problem-solving is also important.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH-UA 122/Calculus II and MATH-UA 123/Calculus III or the equivalent.  Not open to students who have taken MATH-UA 235/Probability and Statistics.

An introduction to the mathematical treatment of random phenomena occurring in the natural, physical, and social sciences. Axioms of mathematical probability, combinatorial analysis, binomial distribution, Poisson and normal approximation, random variables and probability distributions, generating functions, Markov chains applications. 

Sample Syllabus


Media, Culture, & Communication

This course will explore, through a series of lectures and discussions, how the process of globalization is transforming media internationally, with a particular emphasis on the audio-visual media. It will also examine the impact of new technologies, especially the Internet, on global communications. Emphasizing the transnational context of media and culture, the course will aim to approach global media and cultural production from a wide range of theoretical frameworks relevant to contemporary condition - from political economy to cultural analysis. 

Sample Syllabus


Middle Eastern Studies

Please Note: MEIS core courses must be taken at NYU-NY. MEIS majors and minors: courses taken at NYU London do not automatically count towards the major or minor but are subject to DUS review. Students should request approval from the Department prior to registration.

This course explores the origins of Islam and the development of its rituals and doctrines to the 21st century. It assumes no previous background in Islamic studies. Students will learn about topics such as the Koran and the Prophet, Islamic law, the encounter of East and West during the Crusades, and Islam in Britain. They will find out how Muslims in different regions have interpreted and lived their religion in past and present. Readings will include not only scholarly works but also material from primary sources, for example the Koran, biographies and chronicles. The course consists of a combination of lectures, seminar discussions, field trips and includes other media, such as film. 

Sample Syllabus

*Please Note: Does not count toward the major or minor in Middle Eastern Studies.


Philosophy

This is an introduction to some central questions, perplexities and concepts within the main areas of philosophy, introducing themes from metaphysics, epistemology and ethics. Some extracts from some classic texts will be engaged – Plato, Descartes and John Stuart Mill, for example – and contemporary approaches will be addressed. Questions include: What am I? Is free will an illusion? What is knowledge? Is belief in God rational? and Whom ought I to save? In discussing these questions, important distinctions will be introduced and there will be attention to rigorous argument, including the nature of deductively sound argument.

The classes will involve informal instruction and discussion, with a focus upon clarity and argument over a range of topics, though also, it is hoped, with a lightness of touch.

Sample Syllabus

Introduces students to the fundamental theoretical questions of moral philosophy, with attention to both classic and contemporary readings. We will address questions such as: What is the nature of values? Is there such a thing as ethical knowledge? Why should we act morally? How do we decide what morality demands of us in a situation? Note that this is not a course is what is sometimes called ‘applied ethics’. 

Sample Syllabus


Physics

Pre-requisite: MATH-UA 121: Calculus I or equivalent, or completion of the Mathematics for Economics I and II sequence (MATH-UA 211 and 212), or permission of the instructor. Lecture, laboratory, and recitation. Not open to students who have completed Physics I (PHYS-UA 91) with a grade of C-minus or better.

Students should note that the Physics lab takes place at King's College in Waterloo. This is roughly a 30 minute bus journey from the academic centre.

This course begins a two-semester introduction to physics (lecture and laboratory-recitation) intended primarily for preprofessional students and for those majoring in a science other than physics. Topics include kinematics and dynamics of particles; momentum, work, and energy; gravitation; circular, angular, and harmonic motion; mechanical and thermal properties of solids, liquids, and gases; heat and thermodynamics. 

Sample Lecture Syllabus

Sample Lab Syllabus


Politics

Introduction to the politics and society of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Traces the political and social development of the historic countries of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales; the growth of British hegemony and imperialism; the politics of decline and decay; and the promise of rebirth. Studies contemporary political institutions and processes that have undergone massive transformation over the past 50 years. Examines the continuing conflict and terrorism in Northern Ireland and dynamics of change in the Thatcher era and beyond.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines politics and governments in the East European region since the end of the Cold War against the background of wars, revolution, state building and collapse throughout the previous century. It surveys a broad sweep of countries – from Russia to the Czech Republic, and from the Baltic states to former Yugoslavia. It highlights the challenges of development faced by their peoples, how these challenges were met by governments and societies in the new states created after the First World War, under Communism in the Soviet Union and its satellite states, before and after the collapse of the Soviet bloc.

Sample Syllabus

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems - using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis - including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimation of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Sample Syllabus

This course critically investigates European integration, the operation of the EU as a political system and European policies. The course explores the origins, development, institutions, major policies, policy-making, current problems and matters of controversy of the European Community / Union. The major approaches applied to explain integration as well as the complex operation of the EU as a political system are described and discussed. The political and economic logic behind different national perspectives on European integration are examined.

Sample Syllabus

*Please Note: This course does not count towards the major or minor in International Relations.

Characteristics and conditions of war and peace and the transition from one to the other from the perspective of political and social science. Examines the role and use of coercion in global affairs, with emphasis on attempts to substitute negotiation, bargaining, market forces, politics, and law for the resort to massive violence in moderating disputes. Considers recent developments in both the theory and practice of peacebuilding demonstrating the differing ways in which particular conflicts tend to be viewed by participants, external commentators and policy-makers.  Students will also undertake their own research on a case study of conflict.

The course will be taught in the form of an informal lecture and a class discussion, and students will present preliminary versions of their case studies to the class. A visiting speaker from an organisation dealing with issues of violent conflict and peace will also participate in one of the sessions (to be arranged).

Sample Syllabus


Psychology

Fundamental principles of psychology, with emphasis on basic research and applications in psychology's major theoretical areas of study: thought, memory, learning, perception, personality, social processes, development, and the physiological bases of psychology. Direct observation of methods of investigation by laboratory demonstrations and by student participation in current research projects.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

This course provides a detailed introduction to the major topics in cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, including perception, memory, language, problem solving, reasoning, and decision making. The course will discuss cutting-edge developments from research using behavioural, neuroimaging, and clinical methods. The class will involve lectures, student presentations, discussion, video material to accompany lectures, and occasional example class experiments. The course also has a practical component, for which students work in small groups and conduct an empirical study, which they write up in a research report.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PYSCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

This course introduces and examines the core topics of research in Personality and Individual Differences. How and why do individuals differ? What are the methods used to study individual differences? What is personality? What factors influence personality? How stable is personality? Can personality be used to predict real-world outcomes, like mental health, work performance, educational achievement, and romantic relationships? The format of the course will be lectures, presentations and class discussions.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

The themes, methods and ideas of social psychology will be introduced in this course. We will look at how individuals understand themselves and other people, the relationship between behaviour, self and the social situation, and the forces that govern interactions between individuals and groups. We will pay particular attention to the emerging field of social cognitive neuroscience, and moves to understand social phenomena with the tools of cognitive and perceptual psychology.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology and any Core B Psych course (Personality, Social, or Developmental).

The kinds, dynamics, causes, and treatment of psychopathology. Topics include early concepts of abnormal behavior; affective disorders, anxiety disorders, psychosis, and personality disorders; the nature and effectiveness of traditional and modern methods of psychotherapy; and viewpoints of major psychologists past and present.

Sample Syllabus


Public Policy

In all spheres of society, individuals from different faiths are coming into contact with each other more and more often. Effective leadership plays an integral role in bridging communities that historically were separate, but today exist side-by-side in a culture that is religiously and spiritually diverse. This course seeks to prepare students to become aware of faith traditions other than their own, with a strong emphasis on learning techniques and theories of how to engage others. We will look at different theories of religions, current examples of leadership and communities, influence of media, and movements around social justice and service in hopes of laying a foundation for solid connections across religious communities.

Sample Syllabus


Religious Studies

This course explores the origins of Islam and the development of its rituals and doctrines to the 21st century. It assumes no previous background in Islamic studies. Students will learn about topics such as the Koran and the Prophet, Islamic law, the encounter of East and West during the Crusades, and Islam in Britain. They will find out how Muslims in different regions have interpreted and lived their religion in past and present. Readings will include not only scholarly works but also material from primary sources, for example the Koran, biographies and chronicles. The course consists of a combination of lectures, seminar discussions, field trips and includes other media, such as film. 

Sample Syllabus

*Please Note: Does not count toward the major or minor in Middle Eastern Studies.


Sociology

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Fall Semester

Priority: February 15

Regular: March 15

Applications received after March 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.   

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