Calendar of Events

Fall 2018 Teaching Development Programs

The NYU Center for the Advancement of Teaching is pleased to announce its teaching development programming for Fall 2018. These programs are offered at no cost to full- and part-time NYU faculty as well as graduate students. Refreshments will be provided at all programs. Space is limited and registration is required; registration information is included below.

In addition to a variety of lunch programs and intensive workshops, CAT offers the Teaching at the Tap Room series. The Tap Room talks offer a chance for faculty to come together to discuss pedagogical issues with experts and peers alike, while enjoying drinks and refreshments in an informal and relaxed setting.


Teaching at the Tap Room - Why Don’t Students Come to My Office Hours?

  • Wednesday, October 3, 2018
  • 5:00-6:30 p.m.
  • NYU Torch Club
  • 18 Waverly Place

FEATURING: Trace Jordan and Ethan Youngerman, Faculty of Arts and Science

Many of us remember formative learning and mentoring experiences with professors that happened outside of class, especially during office hours. Yet many NYU students (and college students across the country) don’t take advantage of office hours; indeed, our students often don’t know why they should. We will examine research on the importance of faculty-student interactions, including the barriers that inhibit students from showing up to office hours (especially first-generation and international students). We will explore practical steps faculty members can take to encourage students to engage with them outside of class; discuss strategies for making such visits both intellectually rich and interpersonally fulfilling; and share best practices for how to do all this within the constraints of busy academic schedules.


Improving Student Writing Workshop

  • Friday, October 5, 2018
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 802 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Clear writing is required in every field and profession, yet we see students struggle with their written work at all levels of education. As teachers, we may feel powerless to help: how will our students fare in the “real world” if their emails are not only full of mistakes, but also difficult to understand? How can we help them if our expertise is in chemistry, or nursing, or social policy, and not in writing per se? Even if we know what to do, how can we make time for writing instruction with so much content to cover? In this workshop, we will discuss strategies for providing effective feedback on student writing, using writing-to-learn activities in class, scaffolding assignments, and implementing minimal writing instruction that will enhance rather than distract from the central concerns of your course. 

 


What Makes a Great Teacher 2018 – Insights from 2017-2018 NYU Distinguished Teaching Award Winners

  • Thursday, October 11 , 2018
  • 12:30-2:00 p.m.  (Lunch will be offered beginning at 12:15 p.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 914 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: David E. Kirkland, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development; Michael Knox, Tandon School of Engineering; Sara Murphy, Gallatin School of Individualized Study; Charlie Rubin, Tisch School of the Arts; Stephen Small, Faculty of Arts and Science; and Kim Taylor-Thompson, School of Law. Panell to be moderated by former DTA winner Leila Jahangiri, College of Dentistry.

NYU's highest teaching honor, the Distinguished Teaching Award, is given annually to faculty members who have distinguished themselves in educating students in and out of the classroom. CAT is pleased to present winners of the DTA award in a panel discussion on their experiences teaching NYU students.


Syllabus and Course Design Workshop

  • Friday, October 12, 2018
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 802 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

A good syllabus reflects thoughtful course design. In this workshop, we’ll consider how the principle of backward design can help us develop a coherent course and a clear syllabus to better engage our students. We’ll approach the syllabus not only as the repository of information students need to survive the semester, but also as a pedagogical tool with many potential functions (map, manifesto, contract, teaching statement). The session will be interactive, including discussion and group work for participants to work on a syllabus of their own.


Teaching at the Tap Room - Everyone Can Learn: Encouraging Inclusion In and Out of the Classroom

  • Wednesday, October 24, 2018
  • 5:00-6:30 p.m.
  • NYU Torch Club
  • 18 Waverly Place

FEATURING: Allan Goldstein, Tandon School of Engineering

Professor Allan Goldstein will share his experience using participatory research to pair “typical” students—students without disabilities—and people with disabilities in a project-based course. Over the semester, students learn that all people are people first; they learn to talk to the person, not the “chair.” Working with difference sharpens these students’ analytical thinking, while also helping them understand that the invisible impairments they themselves may live with no longer need to be hidden. Typical students and their partners with disabilities both benefit, as inclusion in the classroom expands their horizons and reinforces the fact that the 20% of Americans living with disability today are a vibrant workforce and a large market. We are all variations on the theme of being human.


SPECIAL PROGRAM – How to Write a Compelling Proposal for a CDCF Grant

  • Thursday, October 25 , 2018
  • 12:30-2:00 p.m.  (Lunch will be offered beginning at 12:15 p.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 914 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Mary Brennan, College of Nursing; Nicholas Lanzieri, Silver School of Social Work; and Robert Squillace, Liberal Studies

This session provides practical advice on writing a proposal for the Curriculum Development Challenge Fund (CDCF). The session leaders include a CDCF grant recipient and an experienced member of the CDCF Selection Committee. We will examine best practices for submitting a competitive proposal, which include:

* Paying close attention to the proposal guidelines
* Providing a compelling rationale for your project
* Establishing a productive collaboration
* Justifying your budget expenses

Following the presentation, we will reserve time for a Q&A session in which participants can ask questions that pertain to their specific proposal.


Teaching with PowerPoint Workshop

  • Friday, October 26, 2018
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Rooms 905/907  (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Why use PowerPoint in the classroom? Too often we take the answer for granted, if we even consider the question to begin with. In this workshop, we will consider how PowerPoint can be used to enhance—or at least not impede—student learning. One way is to emphasize “engagement” over “presentation.” Others include maximizing your slides’ visual potential while minimizing their content. Through hands-on activities and discussion, we will explore how to design clear and memorable slides, as well as how to use them in the classroom to support active learning.


Career Readiness in the Curriculum: Equipping Our Students for Success after Graduation

  • Thursday, November 1 , 2018
  • 12:30-2:00 p.m.  (Lunch will be offered beginning at 12:15 p.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 914 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Lourdes Davila, David Hollander, Afrodesia McCannon, and Bethany Godsoe, Wasserman Center for Career Development

How can college instructors help students prepare for a successful career when the courses we teach do not have a vocational focus? Recent studies have shown that students’ experiences in college are central to their career readiness after graduation. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), the competencies desired by employers have a significant overlap with the foundational skills that are cultivated in a liberal arts education, such as oral/written communication, teamwork/collaboration, and global/intercultural competency. A Gallup-Purdue survey found that recent graduates are more likely to be engaged with work if they had a faculty mentor in college, if they worked on a project that lasted a semester or longer, and if they had an internship that demonstrated the application of their learning. This session will feature a panel of NYU faculty members who have enhanced their students' career readiness by incorporating skills, experiences, and mentorship into undergraduate education.

By gaining insight into what employers seek in our students, together with learning about best practices at NYU, you can discover how to integrate career-readiness strategies into your own teaching.


An Explanation of Explanation Workshop

  • Friday, November 2, 2018
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 406 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Teaching is rife with explanation. At every level of instruction and whatever the mode of teaching employed, explanation is central to our work. But what is explanation? How is explanation related to description, analysis, illustration, conceptualization, connecting, and sense-making? What do we do, as instructors, when we explain ideas and concepts, models and frameworks, approaches and strategies, and the like to our students? What, in short, constitutes effective explanation? This workshop will explore these and related questions, as we think together about the nature of explanation and how to improve the effectiveness of our explanatory practices for successful student learning.


Teaching at the Tap Room - Holding Restorative Classroom Conversations

  • Thursday, November 8, 2018
  • 5:00-6:30 p.m.
  • NYU Torch Club
  • 18 Waverly Place

FEATURING: Robert Hawkins, Silver School of Social Work

Sometimes conflict in the classroom is unavoidable. Conflict can be difficult to manage, can deflect from the curriculum, and may interfere with learning. At other times, conflict is welcome and can even enhance the educational experience. This discussion will focus on holding productive conversations in the classroom following conflict. Using a restorative dialogue approach, we will explore how to regain focus and create an environment of acceptance in the classroom while advancing learning outcomes.


Increasing Student Engagement Using Technology in Online, Blended, and In-Person Courses Workshop

  • Friday, November 9, 2018
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 802 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Instructional Designers from NYU IT

With active learning practices on the rise in college and university classrooms, educators are seeking pedagogically sound information about the best ways to implement this teaching approach. Active learning refers to any course-related activity (in-class or out-of-class) that promotes student participation and supports the path to understanding, integrating, evaluating, and applying new ideas and information. Technology tools can offer valuable opportunities to increase student engagement and collaboration.

This two-hour interactive workshop will provide an overview of various pedagogical strategies that can be adapted for use in online, blended, and in-person courses. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about instructional technology tools, and to engage in discussions on effective (and ineffective) active learning techniques.


Teaching Large Lectures

  • Thursday, November 29 , 2018
  • 12:30-2:00 p.m.  (Lunch will be offered beginning at 12:15 p.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 802 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: John Halpin and Crystal Parikh, Faculty of Arts and Science; Jeffrey Younger, Stern School of Business; and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching, Moderator

Teaching large lecture courses presents a variety of challenges for instructors. For students to learn effectively in such courses, instructors need to consider more than the nature of their lecture content and the PowerPoint slides used to convey it. Equally if not more important are what students do during lectures and how they will be assessed on course material delivered via lecture. Key questions to consider are these: How should we design lectures suitable for a diverse student population? How can we gain and keep students’ attention during the lecture? How can we determine whether students are learning what we are teaching? And: What are the best pedagogical lecturing practices for large audiences—practices that lead to deep and long-lasting learning? This panel presentation by three experienced faculty members who teach large lectures explores these and other questions related to fostering student engagement and enhanced student learning.


Selecting the Right Tools for Specific Pedagogical Needs: A review of NYU Tools and Use Cases Workshop

  • Friday, November 30, 2018
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 802 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Instructional Designers from NYU IT

This interactive workshop will explore current teaching and learning tools supported by NYU IT, and will apply tool functionality to solve real-life pedagogical challenges. Guided through both conventional and unconventional demonstrations, attendees will be able to more effectively synthesize the teaching and learning landscape. Real-life pedagogical challenges that will be explored during the workshop will be solicited from attendees prior to the start of the program.

Those with no prior experience working with learning tools as well as those who have previously used them are encouraged to attend.