Jonathan Nagler

Professor, Department of Politics, New York University

Contact Info:

Jonathan Nagler
Department of Politics
New York University
726 Broadway, Room 752
New York, NY 10003-9580

email: jonathan.nagler@nyu.edu

phone: (212) 992-9676
fax: (212) 995-4184
Research
Teaching
 Papers
Links

Research

My research interests are: methodology, campaigns and elections, and specifically the relative impact of the economy and issues on voting.

For a full list of my work, see my Vitae.

Papers

Teaching

New York University

Field Seminar - Electoral Process (Spring, 2004)
This course will examine the major theories of voting in U.S. elections, as well as the evidence for those theories. We will start with models of political socialization, then consider what could be considered its primary competitor: the standard spatial model of voting which is based on the issue positions of voters and candidates. We also consider the effects of the economy on elections: looking both at standard reward-punishment models voters could follow, as well as more modern political-economy variants considering the macro-economy more completely. We then consider the role of information and uncertainty in elections: how voters acquire information, and how uncertainty about candidates' positions influences voter behavior. Finally we consider strategic calculations of both voters and parties.

V53.0395: Elections, Voters, Candidates, and Money (Spring, 2003)
This course focuses on elections: examining the role of candidates, campaign spending, and voters. The course begins with models of political socialization, then consider what could be considered its primary competitor: the standard spatial model of voting which is based on the issue positions of voters and candidates. We also consider the role of information and uncertainty in elections: how voters acquire information, and how uncertainty about candidates' positions influences voter behavior. We pay special attention to the nature of elections in the United States for Congress and examine why incumbents win with such frequency, including what characteristics allow a candidate to raise money.

G53.2324: Campaigns and Elections (graduate).
This course will examine the major theories of voting in U.S. elections, as well as the evidence for those theories. We will start with models of political socialization, then consider what could be considered its primary competitor: the standard spatial model of voting.We then consider the role of information in elections: how voters acquire it, how they process it, and how it influences them. We also consider the effects of the economy on elections: looking both at standard reward-punishment models voters could follow, as well as more modern political-economy variants considering the macro-economy more completely. We examine the roll of campaign spending. And we look at political participation and voter turnout. (Spring 2001).

G53.1120: Quantitative Political Analysis I (graduate).

G53.2127: Quantitative Political Analysis II (graduate). This is a course in regression analysis. It begins with basic hypothesis testing using Ordinary Least Squares regression. In this course we will examine how to build moresophisticated models allowing us to test more complex hypotheses, and also learn more sophisticated statistical tests enabling us to proceed with analysis even when the Gauss-Markov assumptions are violated. The primary emphasis is on identifying statistical techniques appropriate to the question being examined, and correctly applying those techniques.

Harvard University

Gov1000: Introduction to Political Methodology
Gov 2000: Quantitative Methods for Political Science II
Gov 2405: Issues, the Economy, and Elections
Gov 3007: Political Economy Seminar

University of California

PS255: American Electoral Behavior
PS260: Economics and Elections

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Collegues

News

Politics - 2004 Election

Politics

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Last edited: Aug 31, 2004