NYU Alumni College

Come back to class at NYU: a day of learning at NYU for alumni. Attend in person or online.

Friday, October 7, 2016


9:30 AM–4:30 PM

New York University

Washington Square Campus
New York, NY 10012
Or Online via Live Stream

election 2016

The NYU Alumni Association invites our alumni back to the classroom to learn from some of NYU’s most renowned faculty at NYU Alumni College. Relive the academic experience of your NYU education by taking part in intellectual and engaging discussions. Our fall 2016 Alumni College is inspired by Election 2016; hear from NYU faculty experts about the historical context and future ramifications of our current political climate.

For more information, contact the NYU Office of Alumni Relations at alumni.nyc@nyu.edu.

Schedule

8:30 - 9:30 AM

Check-in and Breakfast

NYU Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life, 238 Thompson Street, Colloquium Room

9:30 AM

9:45 - 10:45 AM

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Session 2: The Rise of Extremism in American Politics

NYU Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life, 238 Thompson Street, Colloquium Room
Anna Harvey, Interim Dean of Graduate School Arts and Sciences; Professor of Politics

Studies of congressional roll call voting have revealed a sharp rise in political polarization since the mid-1970s, with the bulk of this polarization due to the increasing extremism in Republican congressional voting behavior. The rise in Republican congressional extremism has given rise to questions about its origins and consequences: Why did Republican extremism begin to increase in the 1970s, continuing through the present election? Why did we see a sharp increase in Republican, but not Democratic, extremism? What have been the consequences of the rise in Republican extremism? This program will address these and related questions.

12:00 - 1:00 PM

Lunch

Kimmel Center for University Life, 60 Washington Square South,
Room 405-406

1:15 - 2:15 PM

2:30 - 3:30 PM

Session 4: After 2016: American Politics and the Prospects for Reform

NYU Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life, 238 Thompson Street, Colloquium Room
Bob Bauer, Professor of Practice and Distinguished Scholar in Residence; Co-Director of the Legislative and Regulatory Process Clinic, NYU School of Law

The program will consist of a discussion of the various and different criticisms heard over the last two years of the American political process, and the implications for coherent--or any--reforms in the years ahead. It has been suggested that government has become "dysfunctional," largely because of undercurrents of political polarization. Congress is incapacitated, it is argued, by partisan division and a weakened leadership unable to discipline their caucuses. Parties are said to have failed in performing their historical role, suffering from increased withdrawal of the electorate from two-party identification and pressed on all sides by third party groups, ranging from Super PACs to interests organized to exert direct influence on government policy. A fractured media environment echoes political divisions and speaks only to audiences open to the particular outlet's message. The electoral process is under attack as an unreliable measure of voter choice among the competing partisan and policy alternatives.

3:30 - 4:30 PM

Closing Remarks and Reception

NYU Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life, 238 Thompson Street, Colloquium Room

Speakers

Tim Naftali

Tim Naftali

Clinical Associate Professor of History and Public Service at NYU Wagner; Co-Director of NYU's Center for the United States and the Cold War

A native of Montreal and a graduate of Yale with a doctorate in history from Harvard, Timothy Naftali writes on national security and intelligence policy, international history, and presidential history. Using Soviet-era documents, he and Russian academic Aleksandr Fursenko wrote the prize-winning One Hell of a Gamble: Khrushchev, Castro and Kennedy, 1958-1964 and Khrushchev's Cold War, the latter winning the Duke of Westminster's Medal for Military Literature in 2007 and inclusion on Foreign Affairs' 2014 list of the ten best books on the Cold War. Read Tim Naftali’s full bio.

Anna Harvey

Anna Harvey

Interim Dean of Graduate School of Arts and Science; Professor of Politics

Interim Dean Harvey is Professor of Politics at NYU. She received her Ph.D. in Politics from Princeton University in 1995, joining NYU in the same year. She is the author of numerous scholarly articles and books, including Votes Without Leverage: Women in American Electoral Politics, 1920-1970 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), and A Mere Machine: The Supreme Court, Congress, and American Democracy (Yale University Press, 2013). Read Anna Harvey’s full bio.

Jay Rosen

Jay Rosen (STEINHARDT '86)

Associate Professor, Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute

Jay Rosen teaches journalism at New York University, where he has been on the faculty since 1986. From 1999 to 2004 he was chair of the department. He is the author of PressThink, a blog about journalism's ordeals in the age of the Web, which he launched in 2003. (http://pressthink.org) In 1999, Yale University Press published his book, What Are Journalists For?, which was about the rise of the civic journalism movement. Rosen has a Ph.D in media studies from NYU. He writes and speaks frequently about new media and the predicament of the press in a time of rapid transformation. As a press critic he focuses on problems in the coverage of politics. On Twitter he is @jayrosen_nyu

Bob Bauer

Bob Bauer

Bob Bauer, Professor of Practice and Distinguished Scholar in Residence; Co-Director of the Legislative and Regulatory Process Clinic, NYU School of Law

In Bob Bauer’s 40 years of practice, he has provided counseling and representation on matters involving the regulation of political activity before the courts and administrative agencies of national party committees, candidates, political committees, individuals, federal officeholders, corporations and trade associations, and tax-exempt groups. He is Professor of Practice and Distinguished Scholar in Residence at New York University Law School, where he teaches courses in political reform, presidential power and legal ethics. Read Bob Bauer’s full bio.

Registration

In Person

$100

Cost includes full day program, breakfast and lunch, and a closing reception. We are honored to invite the Class of 1966 to this event as our special guests, with complimentary admission.

Online Only

$50

Cost includes full-day online access to four academic sessions. Sessions will be available online to webinar registrants for 30 days.