Now approaching its 10th year, the Praska Distinguished Visiting Professorship recognizes a distinguished conservator or scientist who brings new areas for research and teaching to the program in conservation.

Denyse Montegut
Denyse Montegut (Photo Credit: N.L. Roberts)

The Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center, New York University, is pleased to welcome Jo Kirby Atkinson and Denyse Montegut as the 2021–2022 Judith Praska Distinguished Visiting Professors in Conservation and Technical Studies. Atkinson, formerly of the Scientific Department of The National Gallery, London, and Montegut, Professor in the Fashion and Textile Studies at the Fashion Institute of Technology, will teach in fall 2021 and spring 2022 semesters, respectively.

Now approaching its 10th year, the Praska Distinguished Visiting Professorship recognizes a distinguished conservator or scientist who brings new areas for research and teaching to the program in conservation. Atkinson will teach The Science of Color in the fall of 2021 and Montegut will teach in her areas of specialization: the identification of fabrics dating from antiquity to modern times. Both will deliver public lectures during their tenure.

Christine Poggi, the Judy and Michael Steinhardt director of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, said, “We are thrilled that Jo and Denyse will be joining us at the Institute’s Conservation Center in the next academic year. Their talent and mastery over material science and conservation will serve as a rich resource for our students.”

Hannelore Roemich, chair of the Conservation Center and Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Conservation, notes, “Jo’s specialization in textile dyes and artists’ pigments is a crucial addition to our program; we are privileged to be able to host her in the fall term. Denyse’s talent and knowledge of fiber identification is complementing the course offered by Jo and will attract students from all specialties with an interest in many types of objects such as mummy wrappings, Japanese paper, painting canvases, and 1970s ultra-suede dresses.”

Jo Kirby Atkinson is an organic materials scientist recently retired from the Scientific Department of the National Gallery, London. She specializes in the characterization of textile dyes and their transfer into artists’ pigments.


Jo Kirby Atkinson

(Photo courtesy of Jo Kirby Atkinson.)

Atkinson holds a BA from Birkbeck College and Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London; a postgraduate qualification in librarianship from Ealing Technical College; and a BSc in Chemistry and Zoology with Botany from Exeter University. In the fall of 2021, she will offer a course on The Science of Color.

Denyse Montegut, a textile conservator, is professor in the Fashion and Textile Studies Department, School of Graduate Studies, at the Fashion Institute of Technology. Her specialties are microscopy, fiber chemistry, and material science, and she was awarded the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Teaching in 2004. She was chair of her department from 1996 to 2019, during which time she developed its conservation component into a well-respected Master’s training program. She holds a B.A from Brooklyn College, and an M.A. in Art History and a Certificate in Conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She is A.B.D. in Art Conservation Research at the University of Delaware where her dissertation studies focused on textile forgeries of Rhenish 13th–15th century metal printed textiles, a topic that she was introduced to during her 1993 Kress Fellowship at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum. Most recently in 2020, Professor Montegut was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Textile Specialty Group of the American Institute for Conservation. Her course offered in the spring 2022 is titled Polymers, Fibers, Yarns, and Weave Structures in Fabrics.

About the Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University
The Institute of Fine Arts is an international leader in research and graduate teaching, and is committed to global engagement and advancing the fields of art history, archaeology, and the theory and practice of conservation. New York City, with its incomparable resources and vitality, provides a backdrop and extended campus for the Institute’s activities. Founded in 1960, the Conservation Center is the oldest degree-granting graduate program in art conservation in the United States. The Conservation Center offers a four-year, dual MA/MS graduate program that combines training in conservation with historical, archaeological, curatorial, and scientific studies.

For more information, please contact Hannelore Roemich, Chair of the Conservation Center and Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Conservation, at hannelore.roemich@nyu.edu.

www.ifa.nyu.edu/conservation

 

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