The support will enhance remote and in-person teaching of graduate-level art and artifact conservation through guest lectures, student fellowships, and summer work placements in US cultural institutions.

Student attaches small sculpture to base
Sarah Montonchaikul treats “Cult Head,” purportedly from the Congo, in the collection of NYU Africa House. (Photo by: N. L. Roberts.)

The Division of Preservation and Access of the National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center $150,000 to support the project “Managing Change: Developing New Teaching and Learning Modalities in Conservation Education.” In addition to these outright grant funds, the NEH will match up to $100,000 raised from third-party donations for a total of $350,000 in combined federal and third-party funding. These funds will enhance remote and in-person teaching of graduate-level art and artifact conservation through guest lectures, student fellowships, and summer work placements in US cultural institutions.

In response to the necessary transformation of teaching by the Covid-19 pandemic, the project will focus on developing new modalities for art conservation that will blend traditional instruction with remote learning technologies. The project will take place over three years and produce faculty/student-tested videos, images, and assessments of e-learning. The aim is to provide conservation students enrolled in the program and larger humanities communities with novel resources for teaching and learning.

Founded in 1960, the Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts awards a dual MA/MS in art history, archaeology, and conservation after four years of full-time study and practice. The Center teaches students to examine, document, research, and treat works of material culture, and to design, implement, and administer preventive care. The program strives to build skilled, socially aware, resilient, and adaptable conservators of cultural heritage.

“Our rigorous program led by expert faculty successfully delivers a comprehensive and high caliber conservation education,” observes Michele Marincola, Project Director and Sherman Fairchild Professor of Conservation. “This grant from the NEH will provide critical support toward our efforts to secure the most talented students, increase access for underrepresented groups, and minimize student debt at a time of uncertain postgraduate employment. Being recognized by the NEH bolsters our work and strengthens our ability to explore the effectiveness of these new approaches to learning.”

Christine Poggi, Judy and Michael Steinhardt Director of the Institute of Fine Arts, remarked, “The Institute is grateful to be a recipient of this NEH grant that will allow us to assess the potential for training the next generation of conservation professionals via remote and in-person modules. We appreciate the NEH’s dedication to preserving our artistic and historic heritage by maintaining support for our program.”

About the Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University:

The Institute of Fine Arts is an international leader in research and graduate teaching, and committed to global engagement and advancing the fields of art history, archaeology, and the theory and practice of conservation. New York City, with its incomparable resources and vitality, provides a backdrop and extended campus for the Institute’s activities. Founded in 1960, the Conservation Center is the oldest degree-granting graduate program in art conservation in the United States. The Conservation Center offers a four-year, dual MA/MS graduate program combining training in art conservation with historical, archaeological, curatorial, and scientific studies.

About the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH):

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov

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For more information please contact: Hannelore Roemich, Chair and Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Conservation at hr34(at)nyu.edu or Aakash Suchak, Grants Administrator, at ams910(at)nyu.edu.

 

 

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