Étienne Balibar and Marielle Macé will deliver keynote addresses as part of the conference, Rewiring Democracy.

This month, NYU’s La Maison Française hosts a two-day conference, Rewiring Democracy: Beyond “Us” and “Them” (November 8 & 9); returns with its Machines à écrire series (November 4 & 18), which will focus on “Écrire en terre inconnue”; and presents a new series Minority Voices in Early Modern France (November 11 & 25) with talks on Agrippa d’Aubigne’s epic Les Tragiques, and Les Œuvres de Louise Labé.

All events are held at La Maison Française, 16 Washington Mews (between University Place and Fifth Avenue), and are free, open to the public and in English, unless otherwise noted. Seating for free events is on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, call 212.998.8750 or visit nyu.edu/maisonfrancaise. Subways: R, W (8th Street); 6 (Astor Place); A, B, C, D, E, F, M (West 4th Street).

Monday, November 4, 7:00 p.m.
Machines à écrire:
Écrire en terre inconnue

Novelist Maylis de Kerangal, author of Naissance d'un pont (Prix Médicis); Réparer les vivants; and Un Chemin de tables (The Cook, FSG, 2019) will be in conversation with Frédérique Aït-Touati, literary scholar, philosopher, theater director, CRAL (CNRS/EHESS), and author of Histoires et savoirs; Le Monde en images; and Terra Forma.

In French. Florence Gould Event. Sponsored by the Center for French Language and Cultures.­

Friday & Saturday, November 8 & 9
Rewiring Democracy: Beyond "Us" and "Them"

Our current moment is one in which our understanding of democracy is placed under critical pressure, making it increasingly difficult to divide the world into "them" and "us" — and equally difficult to even know what is meant when we say "we." This international conference — organized by Jeanne Etelain and Phillip John Usher — brings together thinkers from France, Europe, and the U.S. who work on the concept of democracy at the intersections of philosophy, political science, ecology, sociology, literature, law, and cinema. Schedules, locations, and full details at as.nyu.edu/research-centers/frenchcenter/rewiring-democracy.

Participants include: Étienne Balibar and Marielle Macé (keynote speakers); Philippe Beck, Ali Benmakhlouf, Jane Bennett, Isabelle Coutant, Martin Crowley, Elsa Dorlin, Jade Lingaard, Susan Maslan, Martin Rueff, Emmanuelle Saada, Joëlle Zask.

In English and French. Sponsored by the Center for French Language and Cultures. Co-sponsored by Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States; NYU Department of French Literature, Thought and Culture; NYU Center for the Humanities; The Florence Gould Foundation.

Monday, November 11, 7:00 p.m.
Politicizing the Past in D’Aubigné’s
Tragiques
 
(Minority Voices in Early Modern France)
Ashley Voeks
, visiting assistant professor of French, Oakland University, leads this lecture on Agrippa d’Aubigne’s epic Les Tragiques (1616), arguing that the author revives sixteenth-century accounts of Protestant martyrdom to propagate an alternate understanding of the religious minority in seventeenth-century France.

Sponsored by the Department of French Literature, Thought, and Culture

Tuesday, November 12, 7:00 p.m.
Victorious Love

Alain Badiou
, philosopher, playwright, and author, will deliver a talk on the topic of love. Badiou has published several books, including The Immanence of Truths; Logic of Worlds; Being and Event; There is No Such Thing as a Sexual Relationship: Two Lessons on Lacan (with Barbara Cassin); and Homme, femme, philosophie. He will be introduced by Emily Apter, chair of Comparative Literature, NYU, and author of Unexceptional Politics: On Obstruction, Impasse and the Impolitic; and Against World Literature: On The Politics of Untranslatability

Co-sponsored by the Department of Comparative Literature and the Department of French Literature, Thought, and Culture

Thursday, November 14, 7:00 p.m.
Denis’s Drifting Bodies

Elisabeth Hodges
, associate professor of French at Miami University, and the author of Urban Poetics in the French Renaissance, examines Claire Denis’s first English-language film High Life (2018) and the effects of spatial-temporal drift on filmic and human bodies.

Sponsored by the Department of French Literature, Thought, and Culture

Monday, November 18, 7:00 p.m.
Machines à écrire:
Écrire en terre inconnue

Olivier Cadiot
(writer, poet, dramatist, translator, and author of L'art poétic’; Futur, ancien, fugitif; Le Colonel des Zouaves) will be in conversation with Frédérique Aït-Touati (literary scholar, philosopher, theater director, CRAL [CNRS/EHESS], and author of Histoires et savoirs; Le Monde en images; Terra Forma.)

In French. Florence Gould Event. Sponsored by the Center for French Language and Cultures.

Monday, November 25, 7:00 p.m.
On the Shoulders of Giants: Rabelaisian Authorial Avatars in the Age of Print
(Minority Voices in Early Modern France)
The point of departure for this talk by Virginia Krause, professor of French Studies at Brown University, is the controversial hypothesis that Les Œuvres de Louise Labé was not the work of a woman author, but rather a literary hoax by a group of male poets. Rather than weighing in on this on-going polemic, however, Krause asks to what extent the conditions underlying the Labé hypothesis apply more generally to works from this period, including those works whose authorship is deemed authentic. Krause is the author of ​Witchcraft, Demonology, and Confession in Early Modern France.

Sponsored by the Department of French Literature, Thought, and Culture

Editor’s Note
For over six decades, La Maison Française of New York University has served as a major forum for French-American cultural and intellectual exchange, offering contemporary perspectives on myriad French and Francophone issues. Its rich program of lectures, symposia, concerts, screenings, exhibitions, and special events provides an invaluable resource to the university community, as well as the general public. For more, please visit nyu.edu/maisonfrancaise.

Press Contact

Amanda Wicks
Amanda Wicks
(212) 992-3788