NYU's Center for Ancient Studies will host “Ovid and Art,” a symposium on the influential Roman poet, on Thurs., April 4

The Center for Ancient Studies will host “Ovid and Art,” a symposium on the influential Roman poet, on Thurs., April 4.

New York University’s Center for Ancient Studies will host “Ovid and Art,” a symposium on the influential Roman poet, on Thurs., April 4, 1 p.m.-7:30 p.m., in NYU’s Hemmerdinger Hall, Silver Center for Arts and Science, 100 Washington Square East (enter at 32 Waverly Place or 31 Washington Place [wheelchair accessible]).

Ovid, regarded as one of the canonical poets of Latin literature, was Rome’s most celebrated and prolific poet before being banished by the Emperor Augustus to a remote stretch of the empire on the Black Sea. His Metamorphoses, composed in the decade before his forced exile and completed just before his departure in 8 C.E., altered the direction of Roman and Western literature. 

The day-long symposium includes presentations on “Ovid and the Triumph of Art” as well as “Modern Metamorphoses from Pablo Picasso to Wangechi Mutu.” The keynote session will feature talks by NYU’s Alessandro Barchiesi on “The Metamorphosis in the Garden” and by Mount Holyoke College’s Bettina Bergmann on “Rapture and Deceit: Ovidian Viewpoints in Roman Art” (5:30 p.m.).

The symposium is held in conjunction with the exhibition, “Metamorphoses: Ovid According to Wally Reinhardt,” at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery, 100 Washington Square East (through April 6).

For more information, including a complete schedule of sessions, please visit: http://as.nyu.edu/ancientstudies/news.html.

The event is free and open to the public, but an RSVP is required at http://as.nyu.edu/ancientstudies/news.html. For more information, call 212.992.7978 or email ancient.studies@nyu.edu for more information. Subway Lines: 6 (Astor Place); R, W (8th Street)

The conference is presented by the NYU Center for Ancient Studies in conjunction with the Grey Art Gallery and the Department of Art History, and is cosponsored by the College of Arts and Science.

EDITOR’S NOTE:
NYU’s Center for Ancient Studies was created in 1996 to promote interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study of the past. Directed by Matthew S. Santirocco, and supported largely through endowment, the Center funds travel grants for undergraduate and graduate students, annual research conferences and lectures, and summer outreach seminars for faculty from across the United States (in collaboration with the Faculty Resource Network). Scholarly organizations that are based at the Center include the American section of the Institute for Etruscan and Italic Studies and its journal, Etruscan News, and the Aquila Theatre Company.   

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