Sociologist Ann Morning is available for comment on the potential impact of the proposed citizenship question on the 2020 U.S. Census and on established procedures for adopting census questions.

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New York University sociologist Ann Morning is available for comment on the potential impact of the proposed citizenship question on the 2020 U.S. Census and on established procedures for adopting census questions.

In April, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments for and against adding a citizenship question to the 2020 U.S. Census—a change sought by the U.S. Department of Commerce. The high court is expected to issue its ruling on the case, Department of Commerce v. New York, later this spring.

Morning, author of The Nature of Race: How Scientists Think and Teach about Human Difference (University of California), is a member of the U.S. Census Bureau National Advisory Committee on Racial, Ethnic, and Other Populations and has served as a statistician for the bureau.

Morning, who has also authored reports for the National Research Council’s Committee on the Use of Social Science Knowledge in Public Policy and the United Nations’ Statistics Division, can address the following areas pertaining to the case:

·      The ethno-racial makeup of the United States

·      The impact of a citizenship question on census tabulations

·      Established procedures for adopting census questions

·      The broader context of the Trump administration’s actions on race and ethnicity

Reporters interested in speaking with Morning should contact James Devitt, NYU’s Office of Public Affairs, at 212.998.6808 or james.devitt@nyu.edu.