Nobel Laureates Angus Deaton and Amartya Sen will discuss “Economics with a Moral Compass? Welfare Economics: Past, Present, and Future,” on Sat., Nov. 17.

Nobel Laureates Angus Deaton and Amartya Sen will discuss “Economics with a Moral Compass? Welfare Economics: Past, Present, and Future,” on Sat., Nov. 17, 2-5 p.m., at NYU’s Kimmel Center for University Life, Rosenthal Pavilion (60 Washington Square South, 10th Floor [at LaGuardia Place]).

Many believe that economics and economists have an important role to play in creating better societies. The bedrock of the economic approach is the field of welfare economics, which studies how to conceptualize and measure welfare with a view to designing better policies and institutions. It also allows ethics and economics to speak to each other. Yet, these aspects of economics are sometimes dismissed as less scientific and therefore marginal to the discipline.

This conversation, chaired by Sir Tim Besley, a professor at the London School of Economics, will focus on bringing ethical issues into economics and the implications this has for the practice and teaching of economics. 

Sir Angus Deaton is senior scholar and the Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of Economics and International Affairs Emeritus at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School and is also Presidential Professor of Economics at the University of Southern California. Amartya Sen is Thomas W. Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University.

The event is free and open to the public. To RSVP, please click here: http://bit.ly/2QD5KPx. For more information, please call 212.992.6592.

For a complete schedule and additional biographical information, please click here: https://bit.ly/2B0MINm.

The event, hosted by the NYU Development Research Institute, the Annual Review of Economics, and NYU’s C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, is supported by NYU's Office of the Provost, NYU Conversations in the Social Sciences, and NYU Africa House. 

Subways: A, B, C, D, E, F, M (West 4th St.); 6 (Astor Place); R, W (8th Street).