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Deutsches House at NYU to Feature Talks on German Identity, the Self in Digital Culture, European Integration, and More in March


Deutsches Haus at NYU will host journalist Jürgen Kuttner presenting an evening of video snippets that address the fragility of German identity (March 2); Andreas Bernard, Euphania University, and Alexander Galloway, NYU Steinhardt, for a conversation about the book Persons of Interest: The Status of the Self in Digital Cultures (March 6); Dr. Gabriele Abels, University of Tübingen in Germany, for a lecture on Germany’s policy toward European integration (March 27); and more in March.

Berlin-based journalist, director, and actor Jürgen Kuttner

Deutsches Haus at NYU will host journalist Jürgen Kuttner presenting an evening of video snippets that address the fragility of German identity (March 2); Andreas Bernard, Euphania University, and Alexander Galloway, NYU Steinhardt, for a conversation about the book Persons of Interest: The Status of the Self in Digital Cultures (March 6); Dr. Gabriele Abels, University of Tübingen in Germany, for a lecture on Germany’s policy toward European integration (March 27); and more in March.

Events at Deutsches Haus are free and open to the public. All events are held at Deutsches Haus’ 42 Washington Mews location (at University Place), unless otherwise noted. If you would like to attend this event, please send an email to deutscheshaus.rsvp@nyu.edu. As space at Deutsches Haus is limited, please arrive 10 minutes prior to the event. Please call 212.998.8660 or visit www.as.nyu.edu/deutscheshaus for more information. Subways: R, W (8th St.); 6 (Astor Pl.)

Friday, March 2, 6:30 p.m.
“Jürgen Kuttner: I Want to Be Americano”
Deutsches Haus at NYU presents “I Wanna Be Americano,” an evening of video snippets with the Berlin-based journalist, director, and actor Jürgen Kuttner, whose presentation will address the fragility of German identity. Jürgen Kuttner presented his evenings of video snippets at the Volksbühne in Berlin each month for over 20 years. Since September 2017, he has continued doing so at the Deutsches Theater in Berlin. Each evening of video snippets is different, as each has its own motto and thesis. The subject may be as fundamental as love, sex, war, kids, soccer, or cars. Alternatively, difficult problems may be addressed such as the democratizing potential of German Schlager, the political suitability of Central American hallucinogenic cacti, Mick Jagger’s aesthetic mistakes, the aggression potential of the German Foreign Minister’s phone ringing, or the question of which presents would please the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Each evening of video clips consists of two elements: the video snippets and Jürgen Kuttner, who finds the videos for the audience in advance, chooses excerpts, and finally presents them. On each evening, roughly 8–10 film excerpts are presented, which are normally 2–4 minutes long. While the excerpts initially came from old episodes of West and East German television, Jürgen Kuttner’s sources are now global. Clips from Chinese, Indian, or Russian television are incorporated alongside Swiss TV episodes or Hollywood B movies. So far, Jürgen Kuttner has presented over 1000 absurd moments of international film and television culture. As informative, bizarre, and entertaining as these clips are, their true impact becomes clear only through Jürgen Kuttner’s commentary.

Tuesday, March 6, 6:30 p.m.
Persons of Interest: The Status of the Self in Digital Cultures | A Conversation between Andreas Bernard and Alexander Galloway”
Deutsches Haus at NYU presents a conversation between Euphania University’s Andreas Bernard and Alexander Galloway, Professor of Media, Culture and Communication at NYU Steinhardt, about Bernard's book Persons of Interest: The Status of the Self in Digital Cultures.

What is striking about today’s methods of self-representation and self-perception – the profiles of social media but also the various locational functions on smartphones or the bodily measurements of the “quantified-self movement” – is the fact that they all derive from methods of criminology, psychology, or psychiatry that were conceived at various points since the end of the nineteenth century. Certain techniques for collecting data, which were long used exclusively by police detectives or scientific authorities to identify suspicious groups of people, are now being applied to everyone who uses a smartphone or social media. Biographical descriptions, GPS transmitters, and measuring devises installed on bodies are no longer just instruments for tracking suspected criminals or patients but are now being used for the sake of having fun, communicating, making money, or finding a romantic partner. This conversation tries to trace back these genealogies and thus present the criminological fundaments of contemporary subjectivity.

This is a DAAD-sponsored event.

Friday, March 9, 6:30 p.m.
Bricks and Mortar | A Conversation between Clemens Meyer and Eric Jarosinski”
Deutsches Haus at NYU and the NYU Department of German present a reading by the author and current DAAD Chair of Contemporary Poetics, Clemens Meyer, from his novel Bricks and Mortar (Im Stein), followed by a conversation with @neinquarterly's Eric Jarosinski. Bricks and Mortar, nominated for the Man Booker International Prize 2017, is the story of the sex trade in a big city in the former GDR, from just before 1989 to the present day, charting the development of the industry from absolute prohibition to full legality in the 20 years following the reunification of Germany. The focus is on the rise and fall of one man from football hooligan to large-scale landlord and service-provider for prostitutes to, ultimately, a man persecuted by those he once trusted. But we also hear other voices: many different women who work in prostitution, their clients, small-time gangsters, an ex-jockey searching for his drug-addict daughter, a businessman from the West, a girl forced into child prostitution, a detective, a pirate radio presenter…

This is a DAAD-sponsored event.

Tuesday, March 27, 6:30 p.m.

“Germany’s Policy Towards European Integration: Still Muddling Through or Leaping Forward?”
Deutsches Haus at NYU presents "Germany's Policy Towards European Integration: Still Muddling Through or Leaping Forward?", a lecture by Dr. Gabriele Abels, Jean Monnet Chair and professor of German and European politics at the University of Tübingen, Germany. The lecture will be followed by a discussion between Dr. Abels and Dr. Sheri Berman, professor of political science at Barnard College.

Germany is a key factor in the politics of European integration. Chancellor Merkel is known to be a strong leader in EU negotiations. However, she has not committed herself to fundamental reforms of the European Union but preferred to muddle through the crisis, whereas the French President Macron has called for a great leap forward. The talk will analyze the politics of the 2013–2017 Merkel government and the 2018 coalition agreement. Is Germany ready to change its policy towards Europe? Or will Chancellor Merkel continue the politics of incremental steps? Will Chancellor Merkel find an answer to President Macron’s proposals and what does this mean for the future of Franco-German relations?

About Deutsches Haus at NYU
Since 1977, Deutsches Haus at NYU has provided New Yorkers with a unique forum for cultural, intellectual, and artistic exchange with Germany, Austria, and Switzerland through its three pillars: the language program, the cultural program, and the children's program. It is one of NYU’s prestigious international houses and is a key American institution fostering the understanding and transatlantic dialogue between the U.S. and the German-speaking world. With a diverse and cutting-edge cultural program, Deutsches Haus particularly seeks to expand its outreach to the next generation of global citizens.