The Hagop Kevorkian Center will host “Memory Metamorphosis: An Exhibition on Palestinian Memory,” which explores Palestinian diasporic memory through art, through January 31.

New York University’s Hagop Kevorkian Center will host “Memory Metamorphosis: An Exhibition on Palestinian Memory,” which explores Palestinian diasporic memory through art, through January 31. Above, "Remembering the Future," by Jacqueline Reem Salloum.

New York University’s Hagop Kevorkian Center will host “Memory Metamorphosis: An Exhibition on Palestinian Memory,” which explores Palestinian diasporic memory through art, through January 31.

Memories establish a connection between personal and collective past, heritage and history. Remembering can bring things together and help give shape to identity that has been fragmented by displacement and diasporic living. There are well over 6 million Palestinians living in diaspora. Most were displaced or expelled over the past 68 years by war and occupation.

“Memory Metamorphosis,” the outcome of a Fall 2016 workshop led by Jacqueline Reem Salloum and Suhel Nafar, Kevorkian’s Palestinian artists-in-residence, explores, executes, and preserves diasporic memory through various art forms, including painting, photography, music, video, and collage. Each piece in the exhibition is inspired by interviews conducted by Kevorkian graduate students with U.S.-based Palestinians about their memories of home.

The exhibition, free and open to the public, features artists from Gaza, Jerusalem, and New York, including: Mohammed Al Hawajri (mixed media artist, Gaza); Marguerite Dabaie (illustrator, New York); Rula Halawani (photographer, Jerusalem); Omnia Hegazy (musician, New York); Suhel Nafar (musician, filmmaker and motion graphics artist, New York); Dina Matar (painter, Gaza); and Jacqueline Reem Salloum (artist and filmmaker, New York). 

What: Memory Metamorphosis: An Exhibition on Palestinian Memory
Where: NYU’s Hagop Kevorkian Center, Ettinghausen Library, 255 Sullivan Street (betw. Washington Sq. South and W. 3rd St.)
When: Through January 31
Hours: Wed.-Sun., noon to 8 p.m.; Mon.-Tues., by appointment (212.998.8877, Kevorkian.Center@nyu.edu)
Subways: A, B, C, D, E, F, M (W. 4th St.)

Editor’s Note:
The Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies at New York University was created in 1966 to foster the interdisciplinary study of the modern and contemporary Middle East and to enhance public understanding of the region. The Kevorkian Center's activities focus on the histories, politics, economies, religions, cultures and languages of the area stretching from North Africa to Central Asia, and on the historical processes that have shaped the present.