New York University’s Center for Ancient Studies will host “Classics and Cognitive Theory,” the Ranieri Colloquium on Ancient Studies, Oct. 27-28.

NYU’s Ranieri Colloquium, “Classics and Cognitive Theory”—October 27-28
New York University’s Center for Ancient Studies will host “Classics and Cognitive Theory,” the Ranieri Colloquium on Ancient Studies, Oct. 27-28.

New York University’s Center for Ancient Studies will host “Classics and Cognitive Theory,” the Ranieri Colloquium on Ancient Studies, Oct. 27-28.

The field of cognitive theory, also known as cognitive science, is an interdisciplinary area that examines the processes of the mind and draws from research in psychology, philosophy, neuroscience, artificial intelligence, linguistics, anthropology, and cognitive archaeology. In recent years, cognitive approaches to the humanities have started to proliferate with work on language, literature, performance, ritual and religion, perception, and emotions.

We are now starting to see scholars working on different aspects of Greek and Roman antiquity engage with the cognitive sciences in a variety of forms. The conference, which will include presentations such as “Animal Sacrifices in Roman Asia Minor,” “Life beyond the Poem: The Odyssey’s Open End,” and “Reading the Mind of Ajax,” among others, seeks to bring together several of them to explore this rich and stimulating new direction for classics.

On Thurs., Oct. 27, sessions will take place in NYU’s Hemmerdinger Hall, Silver Center for Arts and Science, 100 Washington Square East (enter at 32 Waverly Place or 31 Washington Place [wheelchair accessible]); on Friday, Oct. 28, they will be held in NYU’s Kimmel Center for University Life, 60 Washington Square South (at LaGuardia Pl.), Room 802.

The event is free and open to the public, which may call 212.992.7978 or email ancient.studies@nyu.edu for more information. Entry is on a first-come, first-served basis. Subway Lines: 6 (Astor Place); N, R (8th Street); A, C, E, B, D, F, M (W. 4th St.).

The conference is presented by the NYU Center for Ancient Studies and is co-sponsored by the NYU Dean of the College of Arts and Science, the Dean for the Humanities, the Gallatin School of Individualized Study, the Center for Neural Science, the Emotional Brain Institute, the Departments of Classics, Comparative Literature, English, Linguistics, Philosophy, and Psychology, and the Religious Studies Program.

EDITOR’S NOTE:
NYU’s Center for Ancient Studies was created in 1996 to promote interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study of the past. Directed by Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs Matthew S. Santirocco, and supported largely through endowment, the Center funds travel grants for undergraduate and graduate students, annual research conferences and lectures, and summer outreach seminars for faculty from across the United States (in collaboration with the Faculty Resource Network). Scholarly organizations that are based at the Center include the American section of the Institute for Etruscan and Italic Studies and its journal, Etruscan News, and the Aquila Theatre Company.


 

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