NYU’s Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness will host a public debate—“Do Replication Projects Cast Doubt on Many Published Studies in Psychology?”—on Thurs., Sept. 29, 5-7 p.m. at the university’s Kimmel Center for University Life.

NYU to Host Public Debate: “Do Replication Projects Cast Doubt on Many Published Studies in Psychology?”—Sept. 29
NYU’s Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness will host a public debate—“Do Replication Projects Cast Doubt on Many Published Studies in Psychology?”—on Thurs., Sept. 29, 5-7 p.m. at the university’s Kimmel Center for University Life.

NYU’s Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness will host a public debate—“Do Replication Projects Cast Doubt on Many Published Studies in Psychology?”—on Thurs., Sept. 29, 5-7 p.m. at the university’s Kimmel Center for University Life (60 Washington Square South [at LaGuardia Place], room 802).

The evening will feature Brian Nosek, a professor of psychology at the University of Virginia, and Jason Mitchell, a professor of psychology at Harvard University.

Their exchange follows a 2015 report, the Reproducibility Project, which Nosek directed. That report found that less than 40 percent of studies in a sample of psychology papers appearing in academic journals could be replicated when retested by independent researchers. However, since that report, other scholars, including Mitchell, have challenged these findings, arguing that the work of the Reproducibility Project was statistically flawed.

Psychologists are now divided on the question of whether these replication projects undermine many published results in the field. Nosek and Mitchell have opposing views: Nosek, co-founder and director of the Center for Open Science, argues they call many studies into question; Mitchell, director of the Harvard Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Lab, disagrees.

The event is free and open to the public, which may call 646.894.6622 or email consciousness@nyu.edu for more information. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. Subway Lines: A, B, C, D, E, F, M (West 4th Street).

Editor’s Note:
The NYU Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness is devoted to foundational issues in the mind-brain sciences. It takes an interdisciplinary approach, including philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, computer science, and other areas. 

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