NYU's Asian/Pacific/American Institute will host a screening of queer experimental Asian/Pacific cinema (Nov. 4) as well as book talks on U.S. prison camps and government surveillance (Nov. 10) and a discussion on race, fashion, and beauty (Nov. 16).

Experimental Film Screening, Plus Book Launches at NYU’s Asian/Pacific/American Institute in Nov.
NYU's Asian/Pacific/American Institute will host a screening of queer experimental Asian/Pacific cinema (Nov. 4) as well as book talks on U.S. prison camps and government surveillance (Nov. 10) and a discussion on race, fashion, and beauty (Nov. 16).

New York University’s Asian/Pacific/American Institute will host a screening of queer experimental Asian/Pacific cinema (Nov. 4) as well as book talks on U.S. prison camps and government surveillance (Nov. 10) and a discussion on race, fashion, and beauty (Nov. 16).

All events are free and open to the public. To RSVP, please call 212.992.9653 or visit www.apa.nyu.edu/events.

Fri., Nov. 4, 7-9 p.m.
Pleasure Principles: Bad Asians, Bottomhood, and the Belated Archive
(screening and discussion)

Location: NYU Cantor Film Center, 36 E. 8th Street, Theater 101
Subways: N/R (8th Street), A/C/E/B/D/F/M (West 4th Street), 6 (Astor Place)

An exploration into queer experimental Asian/Pacific cinema, this event will gather four scholars, curators, and artists whose work addresses the subjects of racialized sexual politics, gender transgression, and the possibilities of pleasure. Eve Oishi (Claremont Graduate University), Nguyen Tan Hoang (University of California, San Diego), and Erica Cho (University of California, San Diego) will screen and discuss moving image works spanning the past several decades. Curated by Leeroy Kun Young Kang (A/P/A Institute Visiting Scholar). Moderated by Gayatri Gopinath (NYU Department of Social & Cultural Analysis).
Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality, NYU Fales Library and Special Collections, Asian Film and Media Initiative in the Tisch School of the Arts’ Department of Cinema Studies, Tisch Initiative for Creative Research, NYU Department of Art and Public Policy, and MIX NYC Queer Experimental Film Festival.

Thurs., Nov. 10, 5-7 p.m.
The Paradox of Rights: Sunaina Marr Maira and A. Naomi Paik
(book talks and discussion)

Location: A/P/A Institute at NYU, 8 Washington Mews
Subways: N/R (8th Street), A/C/E/B/D/F/M (West 4th Street), 6 (Astor Place)

A. Naomi Paik’s (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) Rightlessness: Testimony and Redress in U.S. Prison Camps since World War II (UNC Press, 2016) examines the history of U.S.-maintained prison camps (from World War II internment camps to Guantánamo’s Camp Delta) and the “rightless” populations that they confine. In The 9/11 Generation: Youth, Rights, and Solidarity in the War on Terror (NYU Press, 2016), Sunaina Marr Maira (University of California, Davis) explores how Afghan American, Arab American, and South Asian American youth engage with the “political,” even while under scrutiny and surveillance.
Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for Multicultural Education and Programs, NYU Muslim Students Association, and Guantánamo Public Memory Project.

Wed., Nov. 16, 7-9 p.m.
Fashioning Diaspora: Ayqa Khan, Vanita Reddy, and Meera Sethi
(book talk, artist talks, and discussion)

Location: NYU Steinhardt Pless Hall Lounge, 82 Washington Square East (entrance on Washington Place), First floor
Subways: N/R (8th Street), A/C/E/B/D/F/M (West 4th Street), 6 (Astor Place)

Presentations and a discussion on beauty practice, fashion, labor, and diaspora. Vanita Reddy (Texas A&M University) presents from her new book Fashioning Diaspora: Beauty, Femininity, and South Asian American Culture (Temple University Press, 2016), which carefully maps how transnational itineraries of beauty and fashion shape ideas about cultural identities and racialized belonging. Brooklyn-based artist and photographer Ayqa Khan speaks about her digital illustrations, which aim normalize body hair, and interrogate notions of “feminine” beauty. Meera Sethi, a Toronto and New Delhi-based visual artist, explores fashion and the politics of dress, while foregrounding queer, diasporic, and post-colonial histories. Sharon Heijin Lee and Thuy Linh Tu (both from the NYU Department of Social & Cultural Analysis) serve as discussants.
Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for Multicultural Education & Programs and the A/P/A Studies Program in NYU’s Department of Social & Cultural Analysis.
 

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