NYU Asian/Pacific/American Institute screens a documentary about the effects of the nation’s largest freeway interchange system on a Los Angeles immigrant neighborhood (Mar. 8) and hosts a book talk on the Bronx’s Cambodian refugee community (Mar. 22) and a symposium (Mar. 31) about the current worldwide voyage of the Hōkūle‘a, a Hawaiian voyaging canoe arriving in New York City in June 2016.

Washington Square Arch
NYU Asian/Pacific/American Institute screens a documentary about the effects of the nation’s largest freeway interchange system on a Los Angeles immigrant neighborhood (Mar. 8) and hosts a book talk on the Bronx’s Cambodian refugee community (Mar. 22) and a symposium (Mar. 31) about the current worldwide voyage of the Hōkūle‘a, a Hawaiian voyaging canoe arriving in New York City in June 2016.

New York University’s Asian/Pacific/American Institute screens a documentary about the effects of the nation’s largest freeway interchange system on a Los Angeles immigrant neighborhood (Mar. 8) and hosts a book talk on the Bronx’s Cambodian refugee community (Mar. 22) and a symposium (Mar. 31), with The New School, about the current worldwide voyage of the Hōkūle‘a, a Hawaiian voyaging canoe arriving in New York City in June 2016.

All events are free and open to the public. To RSVP, please call 212.992.9653 or visit www.apa.nyu.edu/events. Subways: N/R (8th Street), A/C/E/B/D/F/M (West 4th Street), 6 (Astor Place).

Tues., Mar. 8, 7-9 p.m.
East LA Interchange
(screening and discussion)
Location: NYU Cantor Film Center, 36 E. 8th Street
The documentary, “East LA Interchange,” tells the story of working-class, immigrant Boyle Heights, the oldest neighborhood in East Los Angeles. Targeted by government policies, real estate laws, and developers, this immigrant neighborhood survived the build¬ing of the largest and busiest freeway interchange system in the nation: the East LA Interchange. The post-screening conversation features director Betsy Kalin, Jack Tchen (A/P/A Institute Founding Director), and George Sanchez (Professor and Vice Dean for Diversity and Strategic Initiatives, University of Southern California).
Co-sponsored by the Urban Democracy Lab.

Tues., Mar. 22, 7-9 p.m.
Unsettled: Cambodian Refugees in the NYC Hyperghetto
(book talk and conversation)
Location: 8 Washington Mews (below 8th Street, between University Place and Fifth Avenue)

In the years during and following the Cambodian genocide, hundreds of thousands of Cambodian refugees were resettled in the US. In the 1980s and 1990s, ten thousand of these refugees arrived in the Bronx. Through the story of Ra Pronh and her family, scholar and organizer Eric Tang (University of Texas, Austin) locates the Bronx Cambodians and their “unclosed sojourn” within a longer history of war and displacement. A/P/A Institute marks the release of this critical new work of activist scholarship with a series of conversations featuring Tang, Pronh, and long-time community organizer Chhaya Chhoum (Executive Director and Cofounder, Mekong NYC).

Co-sponsored by the Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program in the NYU Department of Social & Cultural Analysis.

Thurs., Mar. 31
The Hōkūle‘a: Indigenous Resurgence from Hawai‘i to Mannahatta
Panel 1: 1-3 p.m.
Location: at The New School, Wollman Hall, 65 W. 11th Street (at 6th Avenue), Room 500

Panel 2: 6-8 p.m.
Location: New York University, 20 Cooper Square (between 5th and 6th Streets), 4th Floor

In the summer of 2016, the Hawaiian voyaging canoe Hōkūle‘a will be arriving to New York City—Lenape Territory—as a part of its worldwide voyage called Mālama Honua (to care for our earth). The Hōkūle‘a uses no modern navigational instruments, but instead ongoing Hawaiian creative practices that read the sun, moon, stars, clouds, winds, waves, and the patterns of a diversity of nonhuman species to find their way. The voyage is a part of a global movement for the resurgence of Indigenous knowledges, languages, and land-based practices that are ever needed in the production of alternative futures for this historical moment. This symposium is a means to think through possibilities existent when Indigenous “subjugated knowledges” chart new epistemes for the twenty-first century.

Featuring Hadrien Coumans (The Lenape Center), Jaskiran Dhillon (The New School), Vicente Diaz (University of Minnesota), Steven T. Newcomb (Indigenous Law Institute), J. Kēhaulani Kauanui (Wesleyan University), Dean Saranillio (NYU’s Department of Social and Cultural Analysis), and Leanne Simpson (Dechinta Centre for Research and Learning in Denendeh).

Co-presented by the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU and The New School.

Co-sponsored by the Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program in the NYU Department of Social & Cultural Analysis, Hālāwai, Inc., and Nā ʻŌiwi NYC.

 

Press Contact

James Devitt
James Devitt
(212) 998-6808