Tamar Szabó Gendler, professor of philosophy at Yale University, will deliver a New York Institute of Philosophy Lecture on Friday, Oct. 16, 7 p.m.-9 p.m.

Tamar Szabó Gendler to Deliver New York Institute of Philosophy Lecture, “Self-Regulation: A Recipe Book for Foragers”—Oct. 16
Tamar Szabó Gendler, professor of philosophy at Yale University, will deliver a New York Institute of Philosophy Lecture on Friday, Oct. 16, 7 p.m.-9 p.m.

Tamar Szabó Gendler, professor of philosophy at Yale University, will deliver a New York Institute of Philosophy Lecture on Friday, Oct. 16, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. at New York University's Silver Center for Arts and Science, Jurow Hall, 100 Washington Square East (at Washington Place).

Gendler is the inaugural Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Yale as well as the Vincent J. Scully Professor of Philosophy and professor of psychology and cognitive science. Her research brings together the techniques of traditional Anglo-American philosophy with empirical work from psychology and other social sciences; her interests include the relation between imagination and belief, the contrast between rational and non-rational persuasion, and the role of habits in shaping behavior and judgment.

The lecture, entitled “Self-Regulation: A Recipe Book for Foragers,” explores the question, What does it feel like to act virtuously? The western philosophical tradition offers two competing answers to this question. The first, commonly associated with Aristotle, tells us that virtuous actions should feel automatic and effortless; they are the result of long-term cultivation of character and habit. The second, commonly associated with Kant, tells us that virtuous actions involve effort fully overcoming inclinations to the contrary; they are the result of explicitly willing the correct action in the particular circumstance. Which of these pictures more accurately depicts real-life virtuous agents? Drawing on recent work in developmental, cognitive, and social psychology, as well as historical and contemporary work in western philosophy, this talk offers reasons for thinking that the original dichotomy is mistaken and that both pictures offer important insights on the nature and value of self-regulation.

Gendler is the author of Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology (Oxford, 2013) and Thought Experiments: On the Powers and Limits of Imaginary Cases (Routledge, 2000) as well as co-editor of The Elements of Philosophy (Oxford 2008), Perceptual Experience (Oxford, 2006), Conceivability and Possibility (Oxford 2002), and The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Methodology (Oxford forthcoming). She is also co-editor of the journal Oxford Studies in Epistemology.

The series is co-sponsored by NYU’s Department of Philosophy. The event is free and open to the public, which may call 212.998.9056 or email am3565@nyu.edu for more information. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. Subway Lines: A, B, C, D, E, F, M (West 4th Street) or N, R (8th Street)
 

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