The Gallatin School will host a screening of “The Fabulous Life and Thought of Ahmad Fardid,” a documentary on the philosopher known as the “Iranian Heidegger,” on Wed., Oct. 14, 6:30 p.m. at its Jerry H. Labowitz Theatre for the Performing Arts.

Screening of Documentary on “Iran’s Heidegger”—Oct. 14 at NYU’s Gallatin School
The Gallatin School of Individualized Study will host a screening of “The Fabulous Life and Thought of Ahmad Fardid,” a documentary on the philosopher known as the “Iranian Heidegger,” on Wed., Oct. 14, 6:30 p.m. at its Jerry H. Labowitz Theatre for the Performing Arts

New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study will host a screening of “The Fabulous Life and Thought of Ahmad Fardid,” a documentary on the philosopher known as the “Iranian Heidegger,” on Wed., Oct. 14, 6:30 p.m. at its Jerry H. Labowitz Theatre for the Performing Arts (1 Washington Place [at Broadway]).

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion on life of Fardid (1910-1994) that will include the film’s producer, Ali Mirsepassi, a professor at the Gallatin School and author of a forthcoming work on Fardid’s life that is the basis for the film, and its director, Hamed Yousefi.

The event is free and open to the public. Entry is on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, please call 212.992.7762. Subways: N, R (8th St.); 6 (Astor Pl.).

Other panelists will include: Richard Wolin, a professor at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center and author of Heidegger's Children: Hannah Arendt, Karl Löwith, Hans Jonas, and Herbert Marcuse; Andrew Arato, Dorothy Hart Hirshon Professor of Political and Social Theory at the New School for Social Research; and Asef Bayat, the Catherine and Bruce Bastian Professor of Global and Transnational Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

Using rare and previously inaccessible footage, the documentary explores the life and thought of Fardid. Under the influence of German philosopher Martin Heidegger, Fardid called for the recovery of modern Iran to its spiritual and Islamic roots, a project fueled by his concept of Ghabzadegi (“Westoxification”)—which would quickly become a buzzword in the Iranian critique of the modern and secular West. The film features extensive interviews with Fardid’s former colleagues, associates, and students, as well as scholars of modern Iran.

The event is sponsored by the Gallatin School of Individualized Study, NYU’s Urban Democracy Lab, NYU’s Iranian Studies Initiative, and NYU’s Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies.
 

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