The NYU Center for the Advancement of Teaching is pleased to announce its teaching development programming for Spring 2015. These programs are offered at no cost to full- and part-time NYU faculty as well as graduate students. Refreshments will be provided at all programs. Space is limited and registration is required; registration information is available at The Center for Faculty Advancement's website.

In addition to a variety of lunch programs and intensive workshops, CAT offers the Teaching at the Tap Room series. The Tap Room talks offer a chance for faculty to come together to discuss pedagogical issues with experts and peers alike, while enjoying drinks and refreshments in an informal and relaxed setting.

Teaching at the Tap Room – Teaching Across the Generations

Featuring Catharine Stimpson, Faculty of Arts and Science
Wednesday, February 11, 5:00-7:00 p.m.
NYU Torch Club, 18 Waverly Place

Can age wither one's teaching? Or stale its variety? Join Catharine Stimpson, Professor of English and Dean Emerita of the NYU Graduate School of Arts and Science, who will share her teaching experiences and lead an honest discussion on teaching across the generations.

 

Discussion-Based Teaching Workshop

With Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching
Friday, February 20, 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Global Center for Spiritual Life, 238 Thompson Street, Room 461

Teaching through discussion offers an alternative or useful complement to teaching through lecturing. Leading productive discussion classes, however, requires both preparation and practice. Effective discussions occur when they are prepared in advance, when they are led with a purpose, and when they are summarized and assessed. Good discussions lead to further thinking and more directed discussion.

This workshop will explore the principles of effective discussion-based teaching. Among topics considered will be ways to begin discussions, ways to conclude discussions, and things to avoid during discussions. Participants will have the opportunity to apply the specific strategies considered during the workshop.

 

Engage, Educate, Excel!—Teaching Development Lunch Program

Featuring Leila Jahangiri, and Tom Mucciolo, College of Dentistry
Tuesday, February 24, 12:30-2:00 p.m.
Kimmel Center for University Life, 60 Washington Square South, Room 914

Teaching requires a spectrum of different skills. This program will focus on what it takes to be an effective teacher, using explanations, relevant stories, analogies, and action-driven data that help faculty understand and apply skills in the classroom. Attendees will learn to recognize the needs of students, identify the causes of ineffective teaching, and understand what it takes to develop effective tools for teaching.

 

Teaching at the Tap Room—Mentoring: Up, Down & Sideways

Featuring Michael Dinwiddie, Gallatin School of Individualized Study
Wednesday, March 4, 5:00-7:00 p.m.
NYU Torch Club, 18 Waverly Place

What makes for a healthy mentoring relationship? How does one find suitable mentors? Who initiates the relationship, and under what circumstances? When should we step into the role with our colleagues--and is there a protocol for mentoring the "boss"? Faculty members and graduate students are invited to join in this discussion.

 

Critical Reading Across the Disciplines Workshop

With Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching
Friday, March 6, 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Global Center for Spiritual Life, 238 Thompson Street, Room 461

A major challenge confronting instructors in every academic discipline is ensuring that students are able to read critically the texts they are assigned. What is critical reading? How is it taught in your discipline? How is critical reading different in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities? How is it the same? In this workshop, we will explore these and related questions in order to better understand what students need to learn to become effective critical readers. The workshop leaders will provide sample texts from across the curriculum and demonstrate the critical reading strategies they use in their own teaching.

 

Increasing Student Engagement Through Active Learning—Teaching Development Lunch Program

Thursday, March 12, 12:30-2:00 p.m.
Kimmel Center for University Life, 60 Washington Square South, Room 914

Active learning refers to any course-related activity (in- or out-of-class) that requires students to take a participatory role in their learning, and that guides them in understanding, integrating, evaluating, and applying new ideas and information. This presentation will include a discussion of active learning strategies that involve little preparation or in-class delivery time, as well as more intensive approaches.

 

Teaching in China—Teaching Development Lunch Program

Featuring Brian Coppola, University of Michigan
Thursday, March 26, 12:30-2:00 p.m.
Kimmel Center for University Life, 60 Washington Square South, Room 914

In this presentation, Professor of Chemistry Brian Coppola will compare and contrast his experiences in China and the U.S., and also relate the perspectives of professors from China who have spent up to a year visiting his classes and institution.

 

Teaching at the Tap Room—Kitchen Chemistry: Making Science Education Palatable

Featuring Kent Kirshenbaum, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science
Wednesday, April 1, 5:00-7:00 p.m.
NYU Torch Club, 18 Waverly Place

Teaching science to non-scientists can be a daunting challenge. Although scientific literacy is increasingly important, broad audiences often perceive scientific endeavors as arcane, scientists as aloof, technical language as opaque, and science itself as not relevant to daily life. These biases can be, and must be, overturned. Context counts. The kitchen can be a classroom. The Experimental Cuisine Collective is an innovative science outreach organization founded at NYU by a chemist, a food historian, and a pastry chef. The "ECC" offers a menu of scientific programs that are both zesty and rigorous. Science is served.

 

Syllabus Design Workshop

With Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching
Friday, April 17, 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Global Center for Spiritual Life, 238 Thompson Street, Room 461

A good syllabus reflects thoughtful course design, which begins with defining appropriate learning goals for the level of class and students in it. The goals should be attainable in a single term and should be rooted in the discipline and clear to the students. That’s just the beginning. Additional considerations include the educational philosophy that underlies the syllabus, the teaching methods to be used during the course, the conceptual framework for the course and syllabus, the responsibilities of instructor and students—and much more.

This workshop will explore the essential aspects of syllabus design. It will introduce and make use of the concepts of backward design and understanding by design. Participants will have the opportunity to work on a syllabus of their own and to apply the strategies for good syllabus design during the workshop.

 

Creating Engaging Content for Teaching & Learning Workshop

Friday, April 24, 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Bobst Library, Room 619

Academic Technology Services will provide information on producing Instructional Video Modules: short, self-paced media vignettes that enable faculty to meet learning objectives. Faculty will learn how to engage students while presenting difficult concepts, case studies, and prerequisite content, in ways that can help solve the problem of having insufficient face-to-face time.

 

NYU faculty members and graduate students are invited to participate in these programs. Lunch/Refreshments will be provided. Enrollment limited. To register, visit The Center for Faculty Advancement.

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