The Experimental Cuisine Collective will host a discussion on cooking and eating insects on Tuesday, April 28.

The Experimental Cuisine Collective will host a discussion on cooking and eating insects -- such as these fried crickets -- on Tuesday, April 28. ©shiero2546/iStock

Insects are nutritious, abundant on every continent, and – according to some – delicious. But why are they such a small component of human diets?

The Experimental Cuisine Collective will host a discussion on cooking and eating insects on Tuesday, April 28 from 4 to 6 p.m. at NYU’s Department of Chemistry, Room 1003 (31 Washington Place, between Washington Square Park and Greene Street).

The 2013 publication of the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization report, Edible insects: Future prospects for food and feed security, sparked a flurry of research, development, entrepreneurship, and public dialogue on the topic of eating insects. It raised questions about the role of insects in creating more sustainable approaches for our food system, including: How do we assess claims regarding the environmental superiority of insects? What might the impact of widespread insect eating be upon land, water, biodiversity, and climate? And what does the future of the "insect industry" hold?

Mark Bomford, director of the Yale Sustainable Food Project, and Greg Sewitz and Gabi Lewis of Exo, the maker of cricket flour protein bars, will discuss the consumption of insects, looking at these questions and issues from cultural, sustainable, culinary, and entrepreneurial perspectives.

Reporters interested in attending must contact Rachel Harrison, NYU Office of Public Affairs, at 212.998.6797 or rachel.harrison@nyu.edu. Space is limited; RSVP and photo ID are required to enter the building.

The Experimental Cuisine Collective is a working group that assembles scholars, scientists, chefs, writers, journalists, artists, and other food enthusiasts to examine the properties, boundaries, and conventions of food using a rigorous academic approach. The collective, which hosts monthly workshops on topics from butter to composting, was created in 2007 by Kent Kirshenbaum, NYU professor of chemistry; Amy Bentley, associate professor of food studies at NYU Steinhardt; and Chef Will Goldfarb of WillPowder.

About the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development (@nyusteinhardt)
Located in the heart of Greenwich Village, NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development prepares students for careers in the arts, education, health, media, and psychology. Since its founding in 1890, the Steinhardt School's mission has been to expand human capacity through public service, global collaboration, research, scholarship, and practice. To learn more about NYU Steinhardt, visit steinhardt.nyu.edu.

Press Contact

Rachel Harrison
Rachel Harrison
(212) 998-6797