center-for-the-advancement-of-teaching-announces-fall-2014-schedule

The NYU Center for the Advancement of Teaching is pleased to announce its teaching development programming for Fall 2014. These programs are offered at no cost to full- and part-time NYU faculty as well as graduate students. Refreshments will be provided at all programs. Space is limited and registration is required; registration information is included below.

In addition to a variety of lunch programs and intensive workshops, CAT offers the Teaching at the Tap Room series. The Tap Room talks offer a chance for faculty to come together to discuss pedagogical issues with experts and peers alike, while enjoying drinks and refreshments in an informal and relaxed setting.

Teaching at the Tap Room: ‘Gotcha!’ A Faculty Response to Plagiarism

Featuring:
Audrey Wolfson Latourette, Distinguished Professor of Law, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

Wednesday, October 1, 2014, 5:00-7:00 p.m., NYU Torch Club, 18 Waverly Place

Plagiarism has garnered increasing attention prompted by a number of high-profile cases and increased media focus on the outing of offenders. Recently published research demonstrates a growing inclination on the part of college and university students to engage in a variety of cheating practices.

Issues and questions to be addressed include an examination of how violations are treated by faculty in our nation’s colleges and universities. Should both intentional and negligent wrongdoing be considered plagiarism? Is a demonstration of intent required to hold students culpable for a transgression often regarded as an academic death knell? In discussing such questions we will consider whether a “Gotcha!” moment may indeed be translated into a teaching opportunity.

NYU faculty members and graduate students are invited to participate in this program. Refreshments will be provided. Enrollment limited. To register, visit www.nyu.edu/cat

Insights on Teaching with Winners of the 2013-2014 Distinguished Teaching Award

Featuring:
Brett Gary, Leila Jahangiri, Louis Scheeder, and e. Frances White

Wednesday, October 8, 2014, 12:30-2:00 p.m., Lipton Hall in D’Agostino Hall, NYU School of Law

NYU's highest teaching honor, the Distinguished Teaching Award, is given annually to faculty members who have distinguished themselves in educating students in and out of the classroom. CAT is pleased to present winners of the DTA award in a panel discussion on their experiences teaching NYU students.

NYU faculty members and graduate students are invited to participate in this program. Lunch will be provided. Enrollment limited. To register, visit www.nyu.edu/cat

Teaching at the Tap Room: A Discussion with Sharon Olds

Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 5:00-7:00 p.m., NYU Torch Club, 18 Waverly Place

Please join us for a stimulating discussion on teaching with acclaimed writer Sharon Olds, Erich Maria Remarque Professor, Creative Writing Program, NYU.

NYU faculty members and graduate students are invited to participate in this program. Refreshments will be provided. Enrollment limited. To register, visit www.nyu.edu/cat

Teaching Intensive Workshop: Technology Tips and Tricks with NYU Classes

Friday, October 24, 2014, 9:00-11:30 a.m., Kimmel Center, 60 Washington Square South

Rooms 405/406

Join instructional media technologists and eLearning specialists from NYU ITS’ Academic Technology Services for an interactive, hands-on workshop focusing on how and why to design effective course sites within NYU Classes. Faculty participants will have the opportunity to select several ‘specialty stations’ to visit and work together in small groups exploring a series of educational technology topics, including student collaboration, using multimedia within your course, and instructional design techniques. Participants should plan on bringing their laptops to this workshop.

NYU faculty members and graduate students are invited to participate in this program. Breakfast will be provided. Enrollment limited. To register, visit www.nyu.edu/cat

Envisioning and Planning for a More Educated America: Innovation, Disruption, or Improvement?

Featuring:
Martha Kanter, former U.S. Undersecretary of Education

Thursday, October 30, 2014, 12:30-2:00 p.m., Kimmel Center, 60 Washington Square South

Room 914

Do Americans really want a stronger, better educated society in which to live, work, and contribute to something bigger than themselves? Credible research tells us time and time again that higher education is the path toward these ends. Yet there are scholars and policy makers who call themselves reformers who seek to disrupt higher education under the banner of innovation. At the same time, many are frustrated that our nation’s college graduation rates are too low, college costs are increasing too fast, and student debt after graduation is rising. This presentation will offer a national perspective on the progress and impact of American higher education in delivering a more educated America for the 21st century.

NYU faculty members and graduate students are invited to participate in this program. Lunch will be provided. To register, visit www.nyu.edu/cat

Reforming Undergraduate Teaching: Past/Present/Future

Featuring:

Jonathan Zimmerman, NYU Distinguished Teaching Award Winner, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

Monday, November 3, 2014, 12:30-2:00 p.m., Kimmel Center, 60 Washington Square South

Room 802

The cry to ‘reform’ college teaching is as old as college itself. From the inception of American higher education into the mid-19th century, most instruction occurred in a scripted question-and-answer format known as recitation. The development of the research university following the Civil War gave birth to lectures, in which specialized scholars held forth to increasingly large audiences of students. Lectures were leavened in the mid-1900s with discussion sections and other so-called “student-centered” methods, which became the approved doctrine – if not the actual practice – of college pedagogy by the end of the century, when online courses transformed classrooms into chat rooms. At every juncture, critics charged that undergraduate teaching was inadequate to the tasks that Americans set before it. Is it? And, if so, what can we do to improve it?

NYU faculty members and graduate students are invited to participate in this program. Lunch will be provided. To register, visit www.nyu.edu/cat

Teaching Intensive Workshop: Syllabus Development

Featuring:

Robert DiYanni and Anton Borst, Instructional Consultants, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Friday, November 7, 2014, 9:00-11:30 a.m., Kimmel Center, 60 Washington Square South

Room 903

A good syllabus reflects thoughtful course design, which begins with defining learning goals that are attainable in a single term, rooted in the discipline, and clear to the students. Additional considerations include the educational philosophy that underlies the syllabus, the teaching methods to be used during the course, the conceptual framework for the course and syllabus, the responsibilities of instructor and students—and much more.

This workshop will explore the essential aspects of syllabus design. It will introduce and make use of the concepts of backward design and understanding by design. Participants will have the opportunity to work on a syllabus of their own and to apply the strategies for good syllabus design during the workshop.

NYU faculty members are invited to participate in this program. Breakfast will be provided. Enrollment limited to 15-20. To register, visit www.nyu.edu/cat

Teaching at the Tap Room: Patterns and Systems, from World to Mind

Featuring:

Tyler Volk, NYU Distinguished Teaching Award Winner, Professor of Biology and Environmental Studies

Wednesday, December 3, 2014, 5:00-7:00 p.m., NYU Torch Club, 18 Waverly Place

Join us for a discussion of the incorporation of systems and system-thinking into the curriculum. Professor Volk will share his personal experience on the use of instructor-written, trade-professional course books, and the possible development of a large systems-and-systems-thinking course at NYU available to every freshman. If these ideas mean something to you (either positively or negatively), or if you would like to learn more and network with your colleagues, we invite you to attend.

NYU faculty members and graduate students are invited to participate in this program. Refreshments will be provided. Enrollment limited. To register, visit www.nyu.edu/cat

Teaching Intensive Workshop: Discussion-Based Teaching

Featuring:

Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Instructional Consultants, Center for the Advancement of Teaching
Friday, December 5, 2014, 9:00-11:30 a.m., Kimmel Center, 60 Washington Square South
Room 907

Teaching through discussion offers an alternative to teaching through lecturing. Discussion-based teaching provides a useful complement to lectures. Leading productive discussion classes, however, requires both preparation and practice. Effective discussions occur when they are prepared in advance, when they are led with a purpose, and when they are summarized and assessed. Good discussions lead to further thinking and more directed discussion.

This workshop will explore the principles of effective discussion-based teaching. Among topics considered will be ways to begin a discussion, ways to conclude discussions, and things to avoid during discussions. Participants will have the opportunity to apply the specific strategies considered during the workshop.

NYU faculty members are invited to participate in this program. Breakfast will be provided. Enrollment limited to 15-20. To register, visit www.nyu.edu/cat

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