NYU will host “Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War,” a screening and roundtable discussion centered on a WWI African-American combat unit, the 369th Regiment, on Mon., Nov. 10, 5 p.m. at NYU’s Kimmel Center for University Life.

harlems-rattlers-and-the-great-war-in-popular-culture-and-historical-context-screening-roundtable-discussion-nov-10
NYU will host “Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War,” a screening and roundtable discussion centered on a WWI African-American combat unit, the 369th Regiment, on Mon., Nov. 10, 5 p.m. at NYU’s Kimmel Center for University Life. Panelists will include NYU History Professor Jeffrey Sammons and University of Georgia History Professor John Morrow, co-authors of Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality.

New York University will host “Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War,” a screening and roundtable discussion centered on a WWI African-American combat unit, the 369th Regiment, on Mon., Nov. 10, 5 p.m. at NYU’s Kimmel Center for University Life, Eisner and Lubin Auditorium (60 Washington Square South, 4th Floor [at LaGuardia Place]).

The event, which is free and open to the public, will commence with a screening of “Men of Bronze: The Black American Heroes of World War I” (60 min.), a 1977 documentary on the 369th Regiment, also known as “Harlem’s Rattlers,” that grew out of the 15th New York National Guard and eventually fought with the French army in WWI.

The screening will be followed by a roundtable discussion—featuring a panel of historians, literary and cinema experts, and artists—focused on the 369th Regiment’s significance and portrayal in popular culture as well as on other cultural icons of the period. Discussants will include:

• NYU History Professor Jeffrey Sammons and University of Georgia History Professor John Morrow, co-authors of Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality
• Marc Singer, an associate professor of English at Howard University and author of Grant Morrison: Combining the Worlds of Contemporary Comics
• Ed Guerrero, an associate professor in Cinema Studies at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and author of Framing Blackness: The African American Image in Film
• Anne Monahan, a postdoctoral fellow at the Phillips Collection (on the art of Horace Pippin)
• Musician Randy Weston (on the influence of James Reese Europe, who is credited with bringing jazz to Europe)

The event is co-sponsored by the Institute of African American Affairs (IAAA) at NYU and the NYU Department of History.

To RSVP or for more information, please call 212.998.IAAA (4222). For updates and more information please visit the IAAA website: nyuiaaa.org.

 

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