UCLA historian Robert Brenner will deliver “The U.S. Economy Today and Tomorrow: Inequality, Stagnation, Crisis,” a public lecture, on Tues., Nov. 18, 5:30 p.m. at NYU’s Jurow Lecture Hall.

UCLA Historian Brenner on the U.S. Economy and Inequality— Nov. 18
UCLA historian Robert Brenner will deliver “The U.S. Economy Today and Tomorrow: Inequality, Stagnation, Crisis,” a public lecture, on Tues., Nov. 18, 5:30 p.m. at NYU’s Jurow Lecture Hall in Silver Center.

UCLA historian Robert Brenner will deliver “The U.S. Economy Today and Tomorrow: Inequality, Stagnation, Crisis,” a public lecture, on Tues., Nov. 18, 5:30 p.m. at New York University’s Jurow Lecture Hall, Silver Center (100 Washington Square East/enter at 31 Washington Place).

Many analysts have observed that the U.S. economy is in a state of tumult, yet noted the income of financial leaders is reaching a historic high. Private investment in industry is low, government spending on infrastructure has plunged, and output per worker measures are barely increasing, they observe.

In this lecture, Brenner, a Visiting Distinguished Scholar in Residence in NYU’s Department of Sociology and author of The Economics of Global Turbulence and The Boom and the Bubble: The U.S. in the World Economy, will explore the reason for this disconnect between market performance and corporate salaries. Central topics will include the causes of stagnation in production and how it relates to the disparity in income distribution in America. Brenner, director of UCLA’s Center for Social Theory and Comparative History, will also explore how the waning standard of living is laying the groundwork for another very real economic crisis.

The event, an NYU College of Arts and Science Bentson Dean’s Lecture, is free and open to the public. Admission is on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. Please call 212.992.9817 for more information. Subway Lines: 6 (Astor Place); N, R (8th Street).

Reporters wishing to attend the lecture must RSVP to James Devitt, NYU’s Office of Public Affairs, at 212.998.6808 or james.devitt@nyu.edu.
 

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