New Faculty 2020-2021

The faculty at the Gallatin School display a wide range of teaching and research interests. They are teachers and scholars in the humanities and social sciences, in the fields of social, legal, and political thought, in classics, in literature and creative writing, and in the arts, including theater, architecture, design, and visual studies. As the Gallatin School's mission is interdisciplinary in nature, all faculty work together to contribute to the development of innovative programs.

Full-Time Continuing Contract Faculty

David Brooks

David Brooks

David Brooks is Clinical Assistant Professor. He earned his MFA at Columbia University and his BFA at The Cooper Union.

Brooks is an interdisciplinary artist whose work considers the relationship between the individual and the built and natural environments. His work investigates the culture of nature––the ways in which cultural concerns and the natural world define one another––while also questioning the terms through which nature is perceived and utilized. His research interests include anthropogenic impacts, conservation biology, art and activism, material processes, art and ethics, and the history and theory of the avant-garde. Brooks has exhibited at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, CT; MoMA/PS1, NYC; the Dallas Contemporary; Tang Museum, NY; Nouveau Musée National de Monaco; Galerie für Landschaftskunst, Hamburg; Nevada Museum of Art; and the Colby Museum of Art, ME, among others. He has also executed major commissions at the Storm King Art Center, NY; Trust for Governors Island, NYC; deCordova Museum, MA; Cass Sculpture Foundation, UK; as well as Desert Rooftops, a 5000 square-foot urban earthwork produced by Art Production Fund in Times Square. His work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania; Eli & Edythe Broad Art Museum, MI; Tang Museum, NY; Zabludowicz Collection and the Saatchi Gallery, UK; as well as Miami-Dade Art in Public Places and the Rubell Museum in Miami, among others.

Prior to joining NYU Gallatin, Brooks was an assistant professor in the Interdisciplinary Sculpture Department at the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, MD. He is on the advisory board of Pioneer Works, is a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellow, and a 2019 Rome Prize recipient.

Jerome Whitington

Jerome Whitington

Jerome Whitington is Clinical Assistant Professor at Gallatin with an affiliation in Liberal Studies. He earned his Ph.D. and M.A. in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley, and his B.A. in Anthropology and African-American Studies from the University of Texas, Austin.

Whitington is currently writing a historical anthropology of climate change science called Experimental Earth: A Speculative Anthropology of Climate Change, which explores the underpinnings of a speculative relation to planet earth in terms of a genealogy of thought about climate. His first book, Anthropogenic Rivers: The Production of Uncertainty in Lao Hydropower, is an ethnography of corporate sustainability from the vantage of expatriate managers, activists, engineers and sustainability technicians in the hydropower industry in Laos. Other recent publications include “Carbon as a Metric of the Human,” “The Terrestrial Envelope; or, Fourier’s Geological Speculation,” and “Modernist Infrastructure and the Vital Systems Security of Water: Singapore’s Pluripotent Climate Futures.” He has edited three special journal collections:" Ethnographies of the Contemporary Global," "Climate Transformations," and "Science and the Political." His current ethnographic research is titled Accounting for Atmosphere: Climate Change, Quantification, and the New Earth.

Prior to joining NYU, Whitington was the Convenor of the Asia-Pacific Science, Technology and Society Network from 2014-2016. He was Research Fellow at the National University of Singapore from 2011-2016 and Postdoctoral Fellow at Dartmouth College from 2009-2011.