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Marina Zurkow


Marina Zurkow is a professor at the Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) at the Tisch School of the Arts.  She is a media artist focused on technology, environmental issues, and life sciences.

She recently spearheaded Climoji, a project exploring the realities of climate change through daily conversation, along with graduate students Viniyata Pany and Richard Lapham, and the SustainableITP committee.  They received a Green Grant through the NYU Office of Sustainability, which is awarded to faculty, students and staff who aim to improve the university's operational environmental performance.  Support to projects like Climoji demonstrates the commitment toward educating the NYU community and beyond about the importance of sustainable practice.

"Funding is obviously important so people have some financial support.  Art-making is labor, on the one hand.  But in the current value-system, funding is also a primary signifier of cultural, creative and intellectual worth." -Professor Zurkow

The group designed a set of visual emojis ranging from auto emissions, toxic fuels, and plastic bottles.  These emojis address the negative effects of climate change through SMS conversations and hopes to change common discourse surrounding ideas about the environment and daily life. 

To download Climoji and learn more, visit


Mary Leou

Dr. Mary Leou leads the Jane Wallerstein Children & Nature Project, an initiative that enables children and their teachers to explore, and connect to nature in the urban environment. The program provides hands-on activities in partner schools, and allows children to connect to nature through field trips and expeditions to natural areas. Classes visit areas like Inwood Hill Park, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, Central Park, the New York Botanic Gardens or even Black Rock Forest in Millbrook, NY, where they discover wildlife and experience the variety of habitats in our local environment.

“Our Children & Nature program opens doors to nature and provides opportunities for children to explore the outdoors in a variety habitats, from parks, gardens, rivers to streams. These expeditions foster a sense of wonder and curiosity and help create lasting connections to nature in the city. Teachers are then empowered to continue explorations and develop environmental service learning projects at their schools and local communities.“

Susan Gerbino


NYU Silver Clinical Professor Dr. Susan Gerbino is the founder and director of the School’s Zelda Foster Studies Program in Palliative and End-of-Life Care (PELC), which encompasses a range of initiatives designed to develop and mentor PELC social work leaders at all stages of their careers.

The program honors the legacy of Zelda Foster, a pioneer in the development of the hospice movement in the US, which has grown to include a four-year MSW Fellowship for NYU Silver students, an 18-month national Post Master’s Leadership Fellowship, a week-long summer institute in primary palliative care, and a new program in PELC with Deaf, Deaf-Blind, and Hard of Hearing clients, in addition to the original Post-Master’s Certificate program.

Dr. Gerbino explained, “As more Americans are living with serious and chronic illnesses, there is a growing need for well-trained social workers who can advocate for the needs of patients with serious illnesses and their loved ones. Social workers are a vital part of the interdisciplinary team, helping to give voice to vulnerable patients in order to improve quality of life, ensure access to adequate pain and symptom management and attend to the emotional needs of patients and their caregivers. Your contributions have helped NYU Silver fill this gap. Ours is one of the leading programs in the country that is developing a cadre of social work clinicians and leaders with the knowledge and skills to support patients and families as they negotiate the trajectory of illness, end-of-life care and bereavement.”