April 3, 2018

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is largely remembered for his campaigns against segregation, his calls for racial brotherhood, and his unwavering commitment to nonviolence. He is less often remembered, however, for his fervent opposition to increasing global militarism, his all-consuming desire to eradicate poverty, and his vision for a transformed and truly participatory democracy.

Fifty years after his assassination, former Representative Donna Edwards and former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele, in conversation with the Brennan Center’s Ted Johnson, reflected on King’s life and examined the expansion of his activism from 1967 to 1968. Who was King at the end of his life? What is his lasting impact on issues of poverty, war, and democracy? And what must we do to bring about the revolution of values he envisioned?

This program was presented by the The Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law and the NYU Brademas Center, and hosted by NYU Washington, DC

Brennan Center


YOUTUBE MEDIA
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Brademas Center

Donna Edwards

Donna Edwards

Michael Steele

Michael Steele

Theodore Johnson

Theodore Johnson