October 28, 2015  

Pippin 1940

The brief, meteoric career of the self-taught painter Horace Pippin (1888-1946) was inextricably bound up with his military service in World War I. A decorated and disabled veteran of the U.S. Army's storied 369th infantry, he began painting around 1930. His first images were combat scenes, presumably painted from memory, that brought him to the art world's attention within a decade. In the 1940s, at the height of his success, he revived references to his wartime experience--doughboys, trenches, armaments--in paintings that comment on World War II. Close attention to the full range of Pippin's images of war points up the complex ways in which he negotiated his nested identities as African American soldier, veteran, and citizen.

NYU Washington, DC
welcomed historian Anne Monahan as she explored the life and work of Horace Pippin. There was a brief introduction by Professor Jeffrey Sammons, co-author of Harlem's Rattlers and the Great War.  Pippin was a member of the unit to which the book is dedicated.


Anne Monahan

Anne Monahan

Anne Monahan received her Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Delaware. She was also granted the Chester Dale Fellowship from 2015 to 2016. Anne Monahan is an independent scholar who specializes in modern and contemporary art. She is working on the book projects Neo-Primitive: Horace Pippin and American Modernism in the 1930s and 1940s and Radical/Chic: The Legacy of Social Realism in Art of the 1960s.

Jeffrey Sammons

Jeffrey Sammons

Jeffrey T. Sammons is a professor of history at New York University, where he has taught since 1989 in addition to having served previously as the department's director of graduate studies. Sammons earned his B.A. in history at Rutgers College. He earned a masters degree in history from Tufts University in 1974 and became assistant to the President of Lincoln University, before receiving a Whitney M. Young Memorial Fellowship for Leadership Potential in 1975. Sammons earned a PhD in American History from the University of North Carolina in 1982. From there, he took a position as an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Houston. In 1983-84 he was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Cape Town.