January 19, 2018

Global Perspectives

NYU Washington, DC presented a dialogue between former leader of the Israeli Knesset, Avraham Burg and Associated Press writer Seth Borenstein. The conversation examined Burg's writings and speeches that relate to what he describes as the death of democracy and the rise of fascism in Israel. The discussion also covered prospects of peace, a one state solution, and the history and future of US/Israel/Palestine relations. 

YOUTUBE MEDIA
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Avraham Burg

Avraham Burg

Avraham Burg, Speaker of the Fifteenth Knesset, was born in Jerusalem in 1955. Following his military service as an officer in the Paratroop Division, Avraham Burg became one of the leaders of the protest movement against the war in Lebanon. (He was wounded by the hand grenade thrown at the protesters of the Peace Now movement in Jerusalem that caused the death of Emil Grunzweig.)

In 1985, he was appointed by then Prime Minister Shimon Peres to serve as his adviser on Diaspora Affairs, a position he continued in until 1988. That year Burg was elected to the Knesset on the Alignment Party List, where he was a prominent member of the Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee, the Finance Committee and the State Control Committee.

Burg was elected to the Knesset once again in 1992, having placed third on the Labor Party list, after the late Yitzhak Rabin and Shimon Peres. Until 1995, he served as Chairman of the Knesset Education and Culture Committee.

Seth Borenstein

Seth Borenstein

Seth Borenstein was part of an AP Gulf of Mexico oil spill reporting team that won the 2010 George Polk Award for Environment Reporting and a special merit award as part of the 2011 Grantham environment reporting prizes. He was part of a team of finalists for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Columbia space shuttle disaster. A science and environmental journalist for more than 20 years, covering everything from hurricanes to space shuttle launches, Borenstein has also worked for Knight Ridder Newspapers’ Washington Bureau, The Orlando Sentinel, and the Sun-Sentinel in Fort Lauderdale. He is the co-author of three long out-of-print books, two on hurricanes and one on popular science.