December 5, 2018

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NYU Washington, DC and the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU) co-hosted a panel discussion on religious-based bullying.

Last year, ISPU’s annual American Muslim Poll revealed that more than 1 in 3 Muslim families report bullying of their child in school because of their religion. In 1 in 4 of those cases involving Muslim students, a teacher or administrator perpetuated the bullying. Given the prevalence rates and negative mental health outcomes associated with religious-based bullying, it must be considered a public health issue in need of prevention and intervention attention. This new report provided insights from the first-ever National Interfaith Anti-Bullying Summit held in Washington, DC, on December 2–3, 2017. The Summit gathered a multitude of experts on the issue, including advocates, researchers, teachers, parents, physicians, mental health practitioners, and, most importantly, targets of bullying to share their stories of the abuse and how it impacted their mental well-being.

The panel discussion included a conversation about the report findings, recommendations for mental health professionals and educators, the connection between mental health and bullying, translating research recommendations into effective policy and practice, and parent/child accounts of religious-based bullying.


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Dr. Nadia Ansary

Dr. Nadia Ansary

Dr. Rukhsana M. Chaudhry

Dr. Rukhsana M. Chaudhry

Suzanne Greenfield

Suzanne Greenfield

Dr. Harminder Kaur

Dr. Harminder Kaur

Meira Neggaz

Meira Neggaz