Moving Image Archiving and Preservation

preservation audiovisual film motion picture training education masters degree digital copyright conservation

Handling New Media, H72.1805, Fall 2006

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Version 9/6/06
Fall 2006 - Mondays, 9:30 am - 1:30 pm, room 651
Instructor: Mona Jimenez
mona.jimenez@nyu.edu; 212-998-1613

GOALS

This seminar will increase students' knowledge of primary issues and emerging strategies for the preservation of new media and digital works. Students will gain practical skills with identification and risk assessment for works as a whole and their component parts, particularly in the areas of audio and visual media and digital, interactive media projects that are stored on fixed media, presented as installations, and networks. Examples of production modes/works to be studied are animations (individual works and motion graphics) web sites, games, interactive multimedia (i.e., educational/artist CDROMs), and art installations. Students will test principles and practices of traditional collection management with these works, such as appraisal, selection, care and handling, risk/condition assessment, "triage", description, and storage. They will develop an understanding of themes in the history and theory of new media, and will access resources for further study.

EXPECTATIONS

Each student will complete two short-term assignments and contribute to two substantial group projects. Attendance at all classes is expected; more than one unexcused absence will affect grading. Grades will be based on a combination of class preparedness and participation (30%); short-term assignments (10% each); projects (25% each.)

Please note that all written work must utilize proper citations, including proper web citations. Works that do not include complete citations will be returned for revision and considered late. Please read the Plagiarism Advisory at the end of the syllabus.

MIAP Digital Archive

In addition to submitted assignments in print form, all course papers/projects will be submitted to myself and Alicia Kubes in electronic form. The materials will be made part of the MIAP digital archive in a private space for faculty use, and on the MIAP web site. All assignments will be submitted with (1) a MIAP Submission Form and (2) file names that follow MIAP guidelines (which you will receive soon). You will need to indicate on the Submission Form any paper/project that cannot be published on the web due to confidentiality restrictions or other reasons to restrict access.

LOGISTICS AND ADDITIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES

Texts

It is not necessary to purchase books for the course - all readings in hardcopy form, as well as most of those on the web, are on reserve in the Bobst Library and the Study Center in the Cinema Studies Department, 6th floor, 721 Broadway. Please note: occaisionally a reading is only available in one location.

Please note

Some readings have been assigned in other classes in the Moving Image Archiving and Preservation Program; however, the class is open to non-MIAP students so some repetition is necessary to create a context. It is expected that MIAP students will review these readings before class time to re-familiarize themselves with the concepts. This course will have a web presence on "Blackboard" — Please log-on no later than September 14, 2006. More details will follow. The course is available on the "Academics" tab in NYU Home.

Access to Computer Labs

Please see http://www.nyu.edu/its/labs/ for locations and descriptions of NYU's computer labs for work on your computer-related assignments.

Cell phones

Turn completely off during class as they may create problems with classroom audio.

Class 1: September 11

Topics/activities

Resources utilized in today's class

To follow up on these topics and to complete Assignment #1 read

Also read one of the following and incorporate into the assignment:

Class 2: September 18

Due this class:

Topics/activities

Resources for Assignment #2

Resources for computer history

Class 3: September 25

Please note: Class will meet in the computer lab at 35 West 4th Street, 2nd floor from 9:30 - 11:30, and then will move back to Room 651, Tisch, 721 Broadway.

Due this class

Topics/activities

Class 4: October 2

Please note: Class will meet in the computer lab at 35 West 4th Street, 2nd floor from 9:30 - 11:30, and then will move back to Room 651, Tisch, 721 Broadway.

Due this class

Topics/activities

NO CLASS October 9 — No NYU classes scheduled and AMIA week

Class 5: October 16

Please note: Class will meet in the computer lab at 35 West 4th Street, 2nd floor from 9:30 - 11:30, and then will move back to Room 651, Tisch, 721 Broadway.

Due this class

Topics/activities

Class 6: October 23

Please note: Class will meet in the computer lab at 35 West 4th Street, 2nd floor from 9:30 - 11:30, and then will move back to Room 651, Tisch, 721 Broadway.

Due this class

Reading to be announced.

Topics/activities

Class 7: October 30

Due this class

Topics/activities

Class 8: November 6

Due this class

Topics/activities

Class 9: November 13

Please note: Class will meet in the computer lab at 35 West 4th Street, 2nd floor from 9:30 - 11:30, and then will move back to Room 651, Tisch, 721 Broadway.

Due this class

Topics/activities

Class 10: November 20

Due this class

Topics/activities

Class 11: November 22

(NYU make-up day for Oct. 9)

Due this class

Suggested

Topics/activities

Class 12: November 27

Please note: We will be meeting at the Museum of Modern Art, 11 W. 53rd Street between 5th and 6th Avenues.

Due this class

Topics/activities

Class 13: December 4

Due this class

Topics/activities

Class 14: December 11 — Wrap-Up

Due this class

Topics/activities

Plagiarism Advisory

Plagiarism and other violations of the University's published policies are serious offenses and will be punished severely. Plagiarism includes presenting or paraphrasing a phrase, sentence, or passage of a published work (including material from the World-Wide Web) in a paper or exam answer without quotation marks and attribution of the source, submitting your own original work toward requirements in more than one class without the prior permission of the instructors, submitting a paper written by someone else, submitting as your own work any portion of a paper or research that you purchased from another person or commercial firm, and presenting in any other way the work, ideas, data, or words of someone else without attribution. These are punishable offenses whether intended or unintended (e.g., occurs through poor citations or confusion about how to reference properly).

You are encouraged to read additional texts and to discuss the issues of this course and your papers with others; but if you use ideas that come from others, you must acknowledge their help. It is always better to err on the side of acknowledging other people than to fail to do so.

Other offenses against academic integrity include: collaborating with others on assignments without the express permission of the instructor, giving your work to another student to submit as his/her own, copying answers from another student or source materials during examinations, secreting or destroying library or reference materials. . If you have any questions about how to cite sources, what constitutes appropriate use of a text, or other matters of academic integrity, please discuss them with your course instructor.

Anyone caught plagiarizing will fail the course. In addition, violations of academic integrity, including plagiarism, call for disciplinary action through the University.