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FAQ

General Reynolds FAQ

Undergraduate Scholarship FAQ

Graduate Fellowship FAQ

General Reynolds FAQ

What is Social Entrepreneurship?

Social Entrepreneurship is a form of leadership that maximizes the social return on public service efforts while fundamentally and permanently changing the way problems are addressed on a global scale. Social Entrepreneurs employ a wide variety of creative approaches and practices from diverse academic backgrounds, artistic disciplines, and professional sectors in order to develop and implement pattern-breaking solutions for previously intractable social problems in ways that are sustainable and scalable to a larger population.

What is the NYU Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Program in Social Entrepreneurship?

The Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Program in Social Entrepreneurship is designed to attract, encourage, and train a new generation of leaders. Each year, the program will expose a highly selective group of graduate and undergraduate students from throughout NYU to the cross-disciplinary skills, experiences, and networking opportunities needed to advance and support their efforts realize sustainable and scalable pattern-breaking solutions to society's most intractable problems.

The program will also bring the field of social entrepreneurship to the greater NYU community. All interested NYU students can take advantage of many of the program's resources, including access to influential leaders in the field, exposure to cutting-edge research and scholarship on social entrepreneurship, new classes, and the opportunity to participate in skill building activities and trainings.

What is the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation?

The mission of the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation is to help educate young people, to inspire them to believe in their power to make a difference as individuals, and to motivate them to reach their greatest potential as citizens and productive members of society.

Catherine B. Reynolds brings to the world of philanthropy the same energy and entrepreneurial spirit that ensured her success in the realm of commerce. As the leader of two businesses, Mrs. Reynolds created a new and affordable way for Americans to finance a college education. A bold, innovative thinker, she developed a privately-funded alternative to government student loan programs. Through her vision and perseverance, hundreds of thousands of Americans have been able to attend the college of their choice. In only one decade, this creative approach to private educational financing revolutionized student lending and spawned a multibillion-dollar industry of 65 lenders offering more than 200 financial products. Presently, Mrs. Reynolds devotes her time and abilities primarily to philanthropic pursuits as the creator and chairman of one of the largest foundations in the nation.

Undergraduate Scholarship FAQ

What does the Selection Committee look for?

Applicants should have the ability to think globally, an interest in solving large-scale problems, and the willingness to do the work - at all levels - that needs to be done to create and implement solutions to seemingly intractable social problems. Broadly speaking, the program attracts three types of changemakers; 1) those that have or are planning to develop an innovative idea to address a specific social problem in a pattern breaking, sustainable and scalable way, 2) those that will work in and/or build the infrastructure needed for social entrepreneurial work to take root, including individuals who will practice their profession in a social entrepreneurial organization (accountants, lawyers, etc.) and individuals who want to improve the operations and management systems of public, private and not for profit organizations, and 3) those who will bring action oriented awareness on a national and/or global scale to particular social problems through journalism, the arts, photography, film making, television production and other media avenues.

These roles are not necessarily mutually exclusive, and one individual can play multiple roles. Further, each role can be thought of having its own trajectory beginning with the desire to change the world, and ending with the implementation of a pattern breaking, sustainable and scalable idea or approach. Fellows and scholars can be at different points on these trajectories with some working to more fully develop an idea, while others may be ready to launch an idea, while still others may be ready to bring an already launched idea more fully to scale.

Regardless of the developmental stage of the idea or where an applicant is on their social entrepreneurial trajectory, appropriate candidates are academically accomplished individuals from a wide variety of disciplines who have a demonstrable heritage of concern for issues of social importance, have distinguished themselves as a potential changemaker, and are committed to continuing to dedicate themselves to addressing issues of social importance in pattern breaking, sustainable, and scalable ways.

Who is eligible to apply for the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Undergraduate Scholarship?

The Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Undergraduate Scholarship is open to all full-time undergraduate students who will be completing their sophomore years in any school at NYU in May of the academic year in which they apply and will have two full-time years left beginning in the fall of the year they start the scholarship.

Can part-time students apply?

No. Only full-time students enrolled in an undergraduate degree program are eligible to apply.

Am I eligible for the program if I plan to graduate in fewer than two years from my start as a Reynolds Scholar?

No. The Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Undergraduate Scholarship in Social Entrepreneurship is a two-year program.

Do I need to have a fully-developed idea or project in order to apply?

No. The Reynolds Program is looking for three types of changemakers: 1) those that have or are planning to develop an innovative idea to address a specific social problem in a pattern breaking, sustainable and scalable way, 2) those that will work in and/or build the infrastructure needed for social entrepreneurial work to take root, including individuals who will practice their profession in a social entrepreneurial organization (accountants, lawyers, etc.) and individuals who want to improve the operations and management systems of public, private and not for profit organizations, and 3) those who will spur others to action on a national and/or global scale to particular social problems through journalism, the arts, photography, film making, television production and other media avenues.

Each of these roles has a trajectory. We are looking for candidates at many different points in their trajectory.

Is there a GPA requirement to apply?

Yes. Students should have a 3.5 GPA at the time they submit their application.

What is included in the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Undergraduate Scholarship?

At the very heart of the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Scholarship will be an unparalleled program to provide the best in undergraduate school training, education and programming to individuals interested in public service careers and social entrepreneurship. In addition to receiving up to $20,000 per year for each of the final two years of study and a stipend for a summer internship between junior and senior years, undergraduate scholars will take part in a full range of curricular and co-curricular activities and opportunities including:

  • The "Social Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century" Speaker Series: A city-wide speaker series bringing six influential leaders from various fields to NYU each year.
  • Lunches and Dinners with "Social Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century" Speakers: Following the speaking events, approximately 12-15 cohort members share a meal and discussion with the speaker.
  • Expert Advisor Workshops and Panels: Leading professionals, visionaries and thinkers in social entrepreneurship and related fields lead 90-minute seminars, lectures, workshops or sit on panel discussions in a wide variety of areas such as venture capital, cause marketing and outcome metrics.
  • Social Entrepreneurial Coaching Sessions: One-on-one and small group coaching sessions with Susan Davis, President and CEO of BRAC USA and Trabian Shorters, Vice President of Community Programs of the Knight Foundation. Three sessions/year minimum required.
  • Finance 101 for Social Entrepreneurs (1st semester, 1st Reynolds year): Mandatory course. An in-depth, yet comprehensive overview of financial concepts and terms relevant to the social sector.
  • Social Entrepreneurship Class (1st semester, 2nd Reynolds year): Mandatory course in the Wagner school on pertinent cohort-driven social entrepreneurial topics.
  • Summer Internship: Places Undergraduate Scholars with public, private and non-profit organizations for a full-time, ten-week internship designed to further develop the scholars' social entrepreneurial roles. Takes place between the junior and senior years.
  • StartingBloc Fellowships: Opportunity to engage with other young leaders and social entrepreneurial thinkers outside of Reynolds through StartingBloc's Institute for Social Innovation. The Reynolds Program provides a number of fully-funded StartingBloc slots/year. Visit StartingBloc for more information.
  • Monthly Gatherings: A dynamic forum for cross-disciplinary teaching and learning, the gatherings are opportunities for fellows, scholars and alumni to share expertise and skills with their Reynolds colleagues in a formal workshop setting.
  • Projects & Passions: Student-initiated series of peer-review/feedback sessions on presentations of individuals' social entrepreneurial projects, business plans or creative passions.
  • Resource Bank: Provides cohort members focused on launching a new venture or expanding an existing one with a variety of stage appropriate resources. Top tier New York City-based firms and professionals with experience consulting to social entrepreneurs at the start-up and/or expansion phases provide pro-bono consulting in areas such as legal, accounting and financial management, business development, marketing and branding.
  • Business Plan 101 for Social Entrepreneurs: Special annual Monthly Gathering sessions to gain a high-level of understanding of the various components of a business plan document and discuss its relevance in securing funding and building a social venture.
  • Business Plan Development Team: The purpose of this team is to help early-stage and/or expansion-ready social entrepreneurs in the NYU Reynolds Program develop and launch or expand successful social ventures.
  • Reynolds/Youth Venture Be a Changemaker Challenge (All UG students university-wide): Social venture competition providing up to twenty-five, maximum $1,000 seed grants, and a grand prize award of $20,000 in capital for the most promising social venture.
  • Recruitment Ambassadorships: Opportunities to represent the Reynolds Program at Recruitment Fairs across the country.
  • Selection Process: Participate as application reviewers and judges in picking the next class of fellows and scholars.
  • Retreats: Full cohort gatherings at the beginning of each Reynolds year.
  • Conference Scholarships:Opportunities to attend and present at prestigious conferences.

A full list of Reynolds Program Activities, including those available to fellows, can be found here.

What are the coursework requirements for Reynolds Scholars?

Reynolds Scholars are required to take two courses. The first is Finance 101 for Social Entrepreneurs which is an in-depth, yet comprehensive overview of financial concepts and terms relevant to the social sector. The second is a special course on social entrepreneurship and public service through the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. There will also be an opportunity to take advantage of both school and university course offerings related to public service and social entrepreneurship.

How do I apply for the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Undergraduate Scholarship?

Applicants must submit the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Undergraduate Scholarship application and supporting documentation via the online application.

You must first submit Part I (Undergraduate Scholarship Application Intent Form) of your online application . This portion of your application serves two purposes:

  • Notification to the NYU Reynolds Program of your intent to complete an application for an NYU Reynolds Undergraduate Scholarship and
  • Notification to your references of this intent and to provide them with instructions on how to complete their portion of your application.
Please Note: Part I is required in order for you to proceed with your application. Your references will not be able to complete their portion of your application until you have completed this form.

Following the completion of Part I of your application, you will receive an email confirmation with a unique Applicant ID and a link to the application form. You will need the Applicant ID in order to complete Part II of your application.



What school should I choose on my Reynolds Scholarship application if I have a double major with one major outside of my school of enrollment?

Students with a double major should choose the school in which they are enrolled.

I am/will be receiving a separate NYU financial aid award. How will becoming a Reynolds Scholar impact an existing financial aid award?

Existing financial aid awards may be impacted by the Reynolds Scholarship award. The combined award will not be less than $20,000/year for each of the two years of study.

Do I need to supply any additional information to be considered for the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Undergraduate Scholarship?

Yes. In addition to submitting a completed Reynolds Scholarship application form, applicants must submit the following as one PDF document. We strongly suggest that you complete these materials before you start Part II of your application as you may only submit your information once. Click here for an example:

  • Undergraduate transcript including Spring 2010 grades and the classes you have registered for the Fall 2010 semester. An unofficial copy will be sufficient. You may copy and paste your transcript from Albert (please keep original tables intact). Please include "UG Transcript" at the top left of each page of your transcript. Please Note: You must have a 3.5 GPA at the time you submit your application in order to be eligible to apply.
  • Resume divided into the following six sections (Please include "Resume" at the top left of each page of your resume and please do not use any special formatting, spacing, lines, etc):

    • 1. Education (including current NYU school, major(s) and minor(s), if applicable and cumulative and major GPA,
    • 2. Work experience,
    • 3. Volunteer Experience (including any relevant non-paid research work and conference presentation(s),
    • 4. Honors/Scholarships/Awards (if applicable),
    • 5. Relevant High School and College Extracurricular Activities and
    • 6. Publications (if applicable).
  • Social Entrepreneurial questions: Answer the following four questions each in 200 words or fewer.(Please include the question before your answer and "Social Entrepreneurial Questions" at the top left of each page of your answers):

    • 1. What do you think is one — or some — of the biggest problems facing society today and why?
    • 2. If you have a social entrepreneurial idea already, what is it? If you do not, please describe one or a few of the areas you are interested in working in and the type(s) of role(s) you hope to play. Remember, you do not need to have already launched or developed a social entrepreneurial idea in order to be eligible for the Reynolds program.
    • 3. What are some of the specific things you would hope to get from the Reynolds Program that would help you to realize your changemaker goals or vision?
    • 4. What Reynolds activities have you already participated in, if any? What were your key take-aways?
  • Essay: In 500 words or fewer, describe the following: some previous experience where you had the opportunity - working with others or alone - to participate in, design or create a strategy for tackling an issue of social importance. Explain what the problem was/is, how you became interested in the work, what your role was, what the strategy was, and who your allies were. We are as interested in stories of failure as much as we are interested in stories of success. Describe what you learned both about yourself and about the challenge. Identify some of the particular obstacles you encountered, and describe the ways in which you addressed them. Please include “Essay” at the top left of each page of your essay.
  • Biographical Sketch: Broadly speaking, the program attracts three types of changemakers; 1) those that have or are in the process of developing an innovative idea to address a specific social problem in a pattern-breaking, sustainable, and scalable way, 2) those that will work in and/or build the infrastructure needed for social entrepreneurial work to take root, including individuals who will practice their profession in a social entrepreneurial organization (accountants, lawyers, etc.) and individuals who want to improve the operations and management systems of public, private and not-for-profit organizations and, 3) those who will bring action oriented awareness on a national and/or global scale to particular social problems through, journalism, the arts, photography, film making, television production and other media avenues.

    These roles are not necessarily mutually exclusive, and one individual can play multiple roles. Further, each role can be thought of having its own trajectory beginning with the desire to change the world, and ending with the implementation of a pattern breaking, sustainable and scalable idea or approach. Eligible applicants can be at different points on these trajectories with some working to fully develop an idea, while others may be ready to launch an idea, while still others may be ready to bring an already launched idea more fully to scale. (See www.nyu.edu/reynolds for more information.)

    Imagine that you have been selected as a Reynolds Undergraduate Scholar. Please write a biographical sketch of approximately 500 words that describes the experiences in your personal history that have brought you to the Reynolds program. What qualities do you see in yourself that would make you an effective changemaker as described above? Be sure to discuss which changemaker role(s) you plan to play, and what you hope to accomplish both during and following your Reynolds fellowship experience. Only typed biographical sketches will be accepted. Please include “Biographical Sketch" on the top of each page of your biographical sketch.
  • Two Written References: We strongly suggest one reference comes from a faculty or staff member from within the NYU community, and one comes from an individual who can speak directly to your commitment to addressing issues of social importance, who is outside of the NYU community. Click here for information to provide your references prior to their submission of your recommendation.

How will I be notified if I have/have not been nominated as a semi-finalist?

Applicants will be notified of their nomination status via email by February 10, 2011.

How will I be notified if I have/have not been chosen as a finalist?

The Reynolds Program will notify semi-finalists via email of their status no later than February 10, 2011. Students studying abroad may be notified sooner.

If I am not available for an interview during the February 14-18, 2011 interview period, is it possible to do a telephone interview?

Yes. Phone/skype interviews will only be permitted for those students studying abroad in the Spring 2011 semester.

I will be studying abroad during the Spring 2010 semester. Can I still apply?

Full-time degree students participating in a study abroad program during the Spring 2010 semester are eligible to apply for the Reynolds Scholarship. If you are invited to participate in a Selection interview, you will participate in a phone/skype interview (see question and answer above).

How will I be notified if I have/have not been selected as a Reynolds Scholar?

The Reynolds Program will notify finalists of their selection status via email no later than February 23, 2010.

Can I participate as a Reynolds Scholar without participating in the summer internship?

No. Reynolds Scholars must participate in a summer internship between their junior and senior year. The summer internship is an important required part of the Reynolds Scholarship experience. It will provide an opportunity for Reynolds Scholars to gain hands-on experience in a specific area of interest related to social entrepreneurship.

Can I study abroad as a Reynolds Scholar?

Yes. Reynolds Scholars are allowed to study abroad during the scholarship, however, scholars are required to be in NYC during the Fall semesters of both their junior and senior years in order to enroll in the required Reynolds courses. For this reason, the most feasible time to study abroad is during the Spring of your Junior year.

How is the Reynolds/Youth Venture Be a Changemaker Challenge and $1,000 seed grant related to the Undergraduate Scholarship?

The Reynolds Undergraduate Scholarship and the Reynolds/Youth Venture Be a Changemaker (BAC) Challenge social venture competition are two different programs. BAC is a partnership between the NYU Reynolds Program and Youth Venture. The application process and requirements for the Reynolds Undergraduate Scholarship and the Reynolds/Youth Venture Action Plan are different. BAC is open to all NYU undergraduate students to form venture teams that wish to address a social issue. Teams submit an Action Plan and have a chance of receiving a $1,000 seed grant.

Graduate Scholarship FAQ

What does the Selection Committee look for?

Applicants should have the ability to think globally, an interest to solve large-scale problems, and the passion to do the work - at all levels - that needs to be done to create and implement solutions to seemingly intractable social problems. Broadly speaking, the program attracts three types of changemakers; 1) those that have or are planning to develop an innovative idea to address a specific social problem in a pattern breaking, sustainable and scalable way, 2) those that will work in and/or build the infrastructure needed for social entrepreneurial work to take root, including individuals who will practice their profession in a social entrepreneurial organization (accountants, lawyers, etc.) and individuals who want to improve the operations and management systems of public, private and not for profit organizations, and 3) those who will bring action oriented awareness on a national and/or global scale to particular social problems through journalism, the arts, photography, film making, television production and other media avenues.

These roles are not necessarily mutually exclusive, and one individual can play multiple roles. Further, each role can be thought of having its own trajectory beginning with the desire to change the world, and ending with the implementation of a pattern breaking, sustainable and scalable idea or approach. Fellows and scholars can be at different points on these trajectories with some working to more fully develop an idea, while others may be ready to launch an idea, while still others may be ready to bring an already launched idea more fully to scale.

Regardless of the developmental stage of the idea or where an applicant is on their social entrepreneurial trajectory, appropriate candidates are academically accomplished individuals from a wide variety of disciplines who have a demonstrable heritage of concern for issues of social importance, have distinguished themselves as a potential changemaker, and are committed to continuing to dedicate themselves to addressing issues of social importance in pattern breaking, sustainable and scalable ways.

Who is eligible to apply for the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellowship?

The Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellowship is open to new students accepted for Fall enrollment to any full-time two-year master's program (excluding some executive programs), or students that are currently enrolled in the schools of law, medicine, dentistry or some three-year Tisch School of the Arts programs and will have two years remaining beginning in the Fall of the year they enter the fellowship.

Can part-time or continuing and professional students apply?

No. Only full-time students enrolled in a degree program are eligible to apply.

Are international students eligible to apply?

Yes. International students are eligible to apply and participate in the program.

How do I apply for the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellowship?

New students applying for Fall 2011 should submit a Reynolds application to the school or schools (if applying to a dual degree or to more than one graduate degree program) to which they are applying. Current law, medicine, dentistry or some three-year Tisch School of the Arts students with two years remaining beginning September 2011 should apply to the school in which they are enrolled. Click here for more information on school specific deadlines and to submit your online application.

Do I need to supply any additional information to be considered for the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellowship?

Applicants are required to submit a completed Reynolds application form, essay, biographical sketch, endeavor statement/job description and current resume. Please note that, as mentioned in the Reynolds application, the Reynolds Selection Committee will have access to your admission's file.

How should I submit my application if I am applying to one or more dual degree programs or to more than one school?

Applicants applying to one or more dual degree programs or to more than one school should choose both schools on the online Reynolds Fellowship application form.

What is included in the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellowship?

At the very heart of the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellowship will be an unparalleled program to provide the best in graduate school training, education and co-curricular experiences to individuals interested in leadership careers and social entrepreneurship. In addition to receiving up to $25,000 per year for each year of study, graduate fellows will take part in a full range of curricular and co-curricular activities and opportunities including:

  • The "Social Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century" Speaker Series: A city-wide speaker series bringing six influential leaders from various fields to NYU each year.
  • Lunches and Dinners with "Social Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century" Speakers: Following the speaking events, approximately 12-15 cohort members share a meal and discussion with the speaker.
  • NYU Reynolds Expert Advisor Workshops and Panels: Leading professionals, visionaries and thinkers in social entrepreneurship and related fields lead 90-minute seminars, lectures, workshops or sit on panel discussions in a wide variety of areas such as venture capital, cause marketing and outcome metrics.
  • Social Entrepreneurial Coaching Sessions: One-on-one and small group coaching sessions with Susan Davis, President and CEO of BRAC USA and Trabian Shorters, Vice President of Community Programs of the Knight Foundation. Three sessions/year minimum required.
  • Finance 101 for Social Entrepreneurs (1st semester, 1st Reynolds year): Mandatory course. An in-depth, yet comprehensive overview of financial concepts and terms relevant to the social sector.
  • Social Entrepreneurship Class (1st semester, 2nd Reynolds year): Mandatory course in the Wagner school on pertinent cohort-chosen social entrepreneurial topics.
  • Board Corps: Through a partnership with the United Way BoardServe NYC Program, qualified Reynolds Fellows are trained and places as board members of nonprofit organizations in New York City.
  • Monthly Gatherings: A dynamic forum for cross-disciplinary teaching and learning, the gatherings are opportunities for fellows, scholars and alumni to share expertise and skills with their Reynolds colleagues in a formal workshop setting.
  • Projects & Passions: Student-initiated series of peer-review/feedback sessions on presentations of individuals' social entrepreneurial projects, business plans or creative passions.
  • Resource Bank: Provides cohort members focused on launching a new venture or expanding an existing one with a variety of stage appropriate resources. Top tier New York City-based firms and professionals with experience consulting to social entrepreneurs at the start-up and/or expansion phases provide pro-bono consulting in areas such as legal, accounting and financial management, business development, marketing and branding.
  • Business Plan 101 for Social Entrepreneurs: Special annual Month Gathering sessions to gain a high-level of understanding of the various components of a business plan document and discuss its relevance in securing funding and building a social venture.
  • Business Plan Development Team: The purpose of this team is to help early-stage and/or expansion-ready social entrepreneurs in the NYU Reynolds Program develop and launch or expand successful social ventures.
  • Recruitment Ambassadorships: Opportunities to represent the Reynolds Program at Recruitment Fairs across the country.
  • Selection Process: Participate as application reviewers and judges in picking the next class of fellows and scholars.
  • Retreats: Full cohort gatherings at the beginning of each Reynolds year.
  • Conference Scholarships: Opportunities to attend and present at prestigious conferences.

A full list of Reynolds Program Activities, including those available to scholars, can be found here.

 

What are the coursework requirements for Reynolds Fellows?

Reynolds Fellows are required to take two courses. The first is Finance 101 for Social Entrepreneurs which is an in-depth, yet comprehensive overview of financial concepts and terms relevant to the social sector. The second is a special course on social entrepreneurship and public service through the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. There will also be an opportunity to take advantage of both school and university course offerings related to public service and social entrepreneurship.

I am/will be receiving a separate NYU financial aid award. How will becoming a Reynolds Fellow impact an existing financial aid award?

Incoming students accepted into the Reynolds Fellowship already awarded financial aid will need to check with the school to which they have been accepted regarding their combined financial aid award status. Current law, medicine, dentistry, or some Tisch School of the Arts students accepted into the Reynolds Fellowship and already receiving financial aid will need to check with the school they are currently attending regarding their combined financial aid award status. If you are already receiving a full scholarship for tuition and fees from another source, that scholarship will supercede the Reynolds fellowship. Additional Reynolds funds may be issued to cover a portion of course and living expenses at the discretion of the program.

If I am a new student applying to NYU, what happens if I am not admitted to my school until after the Reynolds interview date?

Only students admitted to NYU and selected as a finalist prior to March 8, 2011 are eligible for the fellowship.

How will I be notified if I have been chosen as a finalist?

The Reynolds Program will notify applicants, by email, who have been chosen as finalists no later than March 8, 2011.

If I am not available to attend one of the Regional Interviews from March 14 - April 8, is it possible to do a telephone interview?

No. All finalists must attend an interview during the March 14 - April 8 period. Telephone interviews are not permitted for the Graduate Selection Process.

If I am invited to a Regional Interview, how are travel, room, and board costs handled?

If you are invited to a Regional Interview, the Reynolds Program will pay for your economy-class travel costs and two nights hotel accommodations in a room that you will possibly share with another finalist of the same gender.

How will I be notified if I have/have not been selected as a Reynolds Fellow?

The Reynolds Program will notify finalists as to whether or not they have been selected for the Reynolds Fellowship via email no later than April 15, 2010.

If I am accepted as a Reynolds Fellow, can I defer my acceptance?

Deferral requests are handled on a case-by-case basis and granted only in rare instances.