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February 28, 2013

Song of the Day #1120

Song of the Day: Runnin' Wild, music by A. Harrington Gibbs, lyrics by Joe Gray and Leo Wood, is a 1922 tune that epitomizes the Roaring Twenties. It has been recorded by so many artists, including the great Gypsy jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt and his masterful jazz violinist partner Stephane Grappelli and their Quintet of the Hot Club of France [YouTube music clip]. And then there's a swinging version with Ella Fitzgerald [YouTube music clip]. But the most memorable cinematic take on this tune remains the one performed by Marilyn Monroe in the uproarious 1959 Billy Wilder comedic romp, "Some Like It Hot." The film was nominated for six Academy Awards, winning one for "Best Costume Design, Black and White," but it got swept aside in the 1959 "Ben-Hur" onslaught. The film starred Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon donning their best drag to join an all-girl band, in an attempt to escape incognito from "Spats" Columbo (played by George Raft) and the Chicago mob, seeking to silence them for having stumbled upon the St. Valentine's Day Massacre. There are so many classic moments to this incredible film including a memorable turn by Joe E. Brown. This film earned its rightful place at the top of AFI's 100 Years, 100 Laughs and is among my all-time favorite comedies. Check out this wonderful "Runnin' Wild" YouTube moment from the film. And so ends our Annual Tribute to Film Music.

February 27, 2013

Song of the Day #1119

Song of the Day: Where Love Has Gone ("Main Title"), words and music by Sammy Cahn and Jimmy Van Heusen, is the title track to the 1964 soaper, which starred Susan Hayward, Bette Davis, and Mike Connors (who went on to TV detective fame as "Mannix"). Walter Scharf composed the score, but this Cahn-Van Heusen song is performed over the opening credits by the great Jack Jones [YouTube link].

February 26, 2013

Song of the Day #1118

Song of the Day: 55 Days at Peking ("So Little Time [The Peking Theme]"), lyrics by Paul Francis Webster, music by Dimitri Tiomkin, is heard on the soundtrack to the 1963 historical epic, starring Charlton Heston, David Niven, and Ava Gardner. Tiomkin received Academy Award nominations for both this song and the film's score. The soundtrack features the performance of Andy Williams, who passed away on 25 September 2012 and left us memorable recordings of everything from classic melodic movie themes to classic Christmas perennials. On this date, we also remember those for whom there was "so little time," who died, twenty years ago, in the first attack on the World Trade Center. Check out Andy Williams on YouTube.

February 25, 2013

Song of the Day #1117

Song of the Day: Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy ("George Smiley") [YouTube link], composed by Alberto Iglesias, is the jazz-influenced main title to the 2011 film starring Gary Oldman as George Smiley. This is a pensive, chill track from the Oscar-nominated Iglesias score. Last night was anything but chill, though; Seth McFarlane had a hilarious debut as Oscar host, and the show featured wonderful tributes to movie music, including a lovely ode to Marvin Hamlisch by Barbra Streisand, a show-stopping performance of "Goldfinger" by Shirley Bassey during a 007 celebration, and a performance by Adele, who took home a gold statuette for the newest Bond theme, "Skyfall." The 2013 Oscars are now history, but Film Music February continues till month's end.

February 24, 2013

Song of the Day #1116

Song of the Day: Skyfall ("Main Title"), words and music by Paul Epworth and Adele Adkins, who performs the song at the opening of this 2012 film, one of the best Bond songs in one of the best Bond films ever. It boasts a fine Oscar-nominated score by Thomas Newman. It has all those sexy, ominous Bond chord changes underlying its melody. And while Daniel Craig is no Sean Connery, he still is Daniel Craig, and, as 007, he faces off with a classic Bond villain in Javier Bardem. And Judi Dench is still wonderful as M and we even have a new Q in Ben Whishaw and a Moneypenny and an Aston Martin. This is a great way to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Bond franchise, which has its share of Oscar nominations. This song is also nominated in the Best Original Song category. Enjoy the Oscars. And enjoy the song [YouTube link].

February 23, 2013

Song of the Day #1115

Song of the Day: The Ballad of Bonnie and Clyde, music and lyrics by Mitch Murray and Peter Callander, was recorded in 1967 by Georgie Fame [YouTube music link]. The tune is not heard in the 1967 film, "Bonnie and Clyde," which starred Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker and Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow, the notorious Depression-era bank robbers. But the song was inspired by the film. The film score was written by Charles Strouse; the movie won Oscars for Estelle Parsons (Best Supporting Actress) and Burnett Guffey (Best Cinematography).

February 22, 2013

Song of the Day #1114

Song of the Day: This is My Affair ("I Hum a Waltz") [MySpace clip at that link], lyrics by Mack Gordon and Harry Revel, is introduced in this thoroughly entertaining 1937 susupense film by the amazingly talented Barbara Stanwyck, who co-starred with Robert Taylor. The movie also starred Victor McLaglen, Brian Donlevy, Frank Conroy as President William McKinley and Sidney Blackmer as President Theodore Roosevelt. I have to admit that this is the first, and may be the last, film I've ever seen in which President McKinley figures in an undercover government operation to foil bank robbers. I saw this rare gem (which has been screened with at least five different titles) on TCM not too long ago and was astounded that I hadn't seen it before. I loved it, and also found myself humming this tune for days. Check out the film here; the melody of this charming song is used in the "Main Title" at 00:38 and Stanwyck's turn can be heard at 01:36:44, and the theme rises again at the film's conclusion at 01:38:55.

February 21, 2013

Song of the Day #1113

Song of the Day: Portrait of Jennie, music by J. Russel Robinson, lyrics by Gordon Burdge, is not heard in the film of the same name, but it was a hit for the unmistakable Nat King Cole. The 1948 film is a classic fantasy starring Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten (who were paired in several other films, including the 1945 classic, "Love Letters," with a screenplay by Ayn Rand). This film also includes memorable turns by Ethel Barrymore and Cecil Kellaway. Check out the Nat King Cole version and a sweet trumpet turn by jazz musician Blue Mitchell, with Junior Cook on tenor sax and Harold Mabern on piano.

February 20, 2013

Song of the Day #1112

Song of the Day: The Pink Panther ("It Had Better Be Tonight"/"Meglio Stasera"), composed by Henry Mancini, is one of my all-time favorite Mancini tunes (along with the original Pink Panther theme too). It is also known as "Meglio Stasera," with Italian lyrics by Franco Migliacci and English lyrics by the one and only Johnny Mercer. It is featured in the original 1963 "Pink Panther" flick, which starred Peter Sellers as Inspector Clouseau, David Niven, Robert Wagner, Claudia Cardinale, and our mischievous Pink cat. Check out the original instrumental theme, the Fran Jeffries version from the film, an Ennio Morricone version with vocalist Miranda Martino, and wonderful vocal versions by Sarah Vaughan, Lena Horne, Buddy Greco, Donna Summer and the swinging Michael Buble [YouTube links]. As far as instrumental versions, here's one great big shout out for the 12-string guitar rendition by the great jazz musician Joe Pass.

February 19, 2013

Song of the Day #1111

Song of the Day: Patton ("Main Title") [YouTube link], composed by the legendary Jerry Goldsmith, is easily identifiable from those very first reverberating brass tones. It can be heard at the opening of the terrific 1970 film, in which George C. Scott gave an Oscar-winning Best Actor performance as the famous U.S. general, even if he declined to accept the gold statuette. The Oscar-nominated score is one of the best of the genre and this is one of my favorite war films.

February 18, 2013

Song of the Day #1110

Song of the Day: Where the Boys Are ("Dialectic Jazz") [YouTube film clip at that link], composed by the marvelous Pete Rugolo, is featured in the 1960 film. The film includes a score by George E. Stoll (check him out playing a Venuti-like "cross-bow" jazz violin solo along with a few other innovations!) and pop music from Neil Sedaka and Howard Greenfield, with a hit title track sung by Connie Francis, who was the star of the movie. There's even a tune ("Have You Met Miss Fandango?") by Victor Young and Stella Unger. Rugolo composed music that was utterly sublime for one of my favorite television shows of all time, one whose 50th anniversary I will celebrate later this year: "The Fugitive." This music, however, is played to the hilarious hilt by Frank Gorshin's "Dialectic Jazz Band" in the film. (Gorshin was one great Riddler on the campy 60s "Batman" TV show.) With a title such as "Dialectic Jazz," just how on God's good earth could I possibly resist?

February 17, 2013

Song of the Day #1109

Song of the Day: Ben-Hur ("Arrius' Party") [YouTube link], composed by the great Miklos Rozsa, is a sedate but celebratory theme, from my all-time favorite film, the 1959 epic, "Ben-Hur." Each year, on this date, since I inaugurated "My Favorite Songs," and since February has traditionally been that time of year spent in tribute to film music, I have featured a selection from this, the greatest of movie soundtracks. I saw the film again last night, as part of TCM's "31 Days of Oscar," and it remains the greatest "intimate epic" of all time, in my view. Listening to the 5-CD "Complete Soundtrack Collection" released as a part of FSM Golden Age Classics, I will forever be in love with this music. Happy 53rd birthday to me!

February 16, 2013

Song of the Day #1108

Song of the Day: Aliens ("Main Title") [YouTube link], composed by James Horner, opens "Aliens," the best of the sequels to the iconic 1979 film. This action-packed 1986 film was directed by James Cameron, and starred, once again, Sigourney Weaver as a kick-ass Ripley. Cameron-Horner is as distinctive a collaboration as Hitchcock-Herrmann and Spielberg-Williams. This track is from one of the best scores (and one of the best films) in the sci-fi/horror genre.

February 15, 2013

Song of the Day #1107

Song of the Day: Alien ("Main Title") [YouTube link], composed by Jerry Goldsmith, is one of those unforgettable science fiction-horror themes that conjures up images of an entire film and the franchise to which it gave birth. "In space, no one can hear you scream," went the advertisement. But screams were aplenty in this 1979 iconic film, directed by Ridley Scott, and starring Sigourney Weaver as Ripley. This is one of my all-time favorite films of the genre, with a creepy score to match.

February 14, 2013

Song of the Day #1106

Song of the Day: I Love You (Je t'aime), lyrics by Harlan Thompson, music by Harry Archer, is the 1923 chestnut from the Broadway musical, "Little Jessie James." It was featured prominently in the great Billy Wilder-directed 1953 World War II POW flick, "Stalag 17" (which boasts a soundtrack by Franz Waxman). You can check out the scene, where the song can be heard for around five minutes, starting at 4:20 at this YouTube clip. At 6:08 begins an unmistakably sweet solo by the legendary jazz violinist Joe Venuti. The guy singing in the scene is Ross Bagdasarian, who, under the name David Seville, created Alvin and the Chipmunks. The song is reprised as the film scene continues here, where "Animal" finally gets to dance with "Betty Grable". "Stalag 17" is one of my all-time favorite war flicks; William Holden received a well-deserved Academy Award for Best Actor. What better way to celebrate Valentine's Day than with these Three Little Words?

February 13, 2013

Song of the Day #1105

Song of the Day: The Bishop's Wife ("Main Title") [YouTube clip at that link], composed by Hugo Friedhofer, is a lovely theme to match an even lovelier movie. The 1947 tale, starring Cary Grant, David Niven, and Loretta Young, is one of my all-time favorites.

February 12, 2013

Song of the Day #1104

Song of the Day: What's New Pussycat ("Main Title"), words by Hal David, lyrics by Burt Bacharach, was the delightful theme to the 1965 comedy starring Peter Sellers, Peter O'Toole, and Woody Allen, in his film debut. The Academy Award title song has been covered by many artists, but my favorite remains the rendition provided by Tom Jones for the soundtrack [YouTube link].

February 11, 2013

Song of the Day #1103

Song of the Day: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 ("Dragon Flight"), composed by Alexandre Desplat, is one of the most exhilarating musical moments of the fantastic 2011 final film in the Harry Potter film franchise. Check this out on YouTube. Though Desplat's wonderful soundtrack was nominated for a Grammy Award for "Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media" in 2012, it lost to "The King's Speech," composed by Alexandre Desplat! Last night's Grammy's had just as many surprises.

February 10, 2013

Song of the Day #1102

Song of the Day: The Enforcer ("Rooftop Chase") [YouTube clip at that link], composed by Jerry Fielding, boasts an absolutely sizzling big band arrangement that simultaneously reflects and drives this energized 1976 installment in the "Dirty Harry" film franchise, starring Clint Eastwood. Check out a film montage that features this cue.

February 09, 2013

Song of the Day #1101

Song of the Day: It's You or No One, words and music by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne, can be heard in the 1948 movie, "Romance on the High Seas," sung by Doris Day in her first film role. Check out the scene in the film where Doris Day sings the song for Jack Carson. And check out nice versions by Bobby Darin and jazz guitarists Joe Giglio and Carl Barry (my bro!) and jazz bassist David Shaich, live at The West End, NYC.

February 08, 2013

Song of the Day #1100

Song of the Day: War of the Worlds ("The Intersection Scene") [YouTube link], composed by birthday boy John Williams, encapsulates all the sounds of doom from a good sci-fi flick (though the 1953 film version is still my favorite).

February 07, 2013

Song of the Day #1099

Song of the Day: Blues in Hoss' Flat, composed by musician Frank Foster, is one of those infectious perennial Count Basie numbers that does not owe its origins to the movies. But there is music that achieves eternal shelf life just from a cinematic association, as we have seen with "Cinderfella" Jerry Lewis. In this instance, it's "The Errand Boy," with the irrepressible Jerry Lewis once more.

February 06, 2013

Song of the Day #1098

Song of the Day: Hi Lili Hi Lo, music by Bronislau Kaper, lyrics by Helen Deutsch, was first recorded by Dinah Shore in 1952 (YouTube clip at that link), but the song was featured in the 1953 movie "Lili," starring Leslie Caron, who performed a duet with Mel Ferrer in the film [YouTube link]. Kaper, who wrote one of my all-time favorite film songs ("Invitation"), won the Oscar for this film's soundtrack for "Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture." But by far, my all-time favorite instrumental of this sweet song is that performed by the trailblazing pianist Bill Evans and stupendous bassist Eddie Gomez on their incomparable duet album, "Intuition" [check out that version at this YouTube link]. That album, a Desert Island Disc if ever there were one, also features the duo's equally incomparable version of Kaper's "Invitation" [YouTube clip at that link].

February 05, 2013

Song of the Day #1097

Song of the Day: The Sugarland Express ("Main Theme") [YouTube clip at that link] marked the first of many fruitful collaborations between composer John Williams and director Steven Spielberg. This was Spielberg's first feature film. The main theme for this 1974 film, starring Goldie Hawn, features the superb harmonica work of the stupendous Toots Thielemans. Check out a suite from the soundtrack on YouTube.

February 04, 2013

Song of the Day #1096

Song of the Day: My Week with Marilyn ("Marilyn's Theme"), composed by Alexandre Desplat, is performed brilliantly on solo piano by Lang Lang on the wonderful soundtrack (with music by Desplat and Conrad Pope) to the 2011 film. The melancholy theme is restated on the tracks "Marilyn Alone" and "Remembering Marilyn" (YouTube clips at each link). It has a mournful quality to it, but also one of innocence and depth, all qualities captured by Marilyn Monroe, played well by Michelle Williams. The former Mayor of New York City, Ed Koch, gave this film a fine review on his "Mayor at the Movies," so it is only fitting to give that late Mayor a fine review for his colorful years at the helm of his beloved city. Today, he is laid to rest at Trinity Cemetery, having passed away on Friday, February 1, 2013.

February 03, 2013

Song of the Day #1095

Song of the Day: Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein ("Main Title") [YouTube clip at that link], composed by Frank Skinner, captures both the chills and the laughs of the classic film that drops the immortal comedic duo into the horrors of the Universal monster franchise. Skinner's wonderful score for this 1948 film was given a Halloween tribute by conductor Wlliam Stromberg and the Golden State Pops Orchestra [YouTube link].

February 02, 2013

Song of the Day #1094

Song of the Day: North By Northwest ("The Station"), music by the great Bernard Herrmann, is from my favorite Hitchcock film of all time. This particular cue is on the soundtrack album (listen to it here) for a scene in which Cary Grant tries to elude the authorities and his would-be killers by escaping on the 20th Century Limited at Grand Central Station. That Station opened its doors at midnight on February 2, 1913, and is, today, celebrating its centennial. In this scene from the 1959 cinematic gem, Grant approaches the ticket window at the fabled station, shading his eyes with dark glasses. The ticket clerk, played by Ned Glass, knows he is dealing with a fugitive and asks Grant: "Is there something wrong with your eyes?" "Yes," Grant says, visibly irritated, "they're sensitive to questions." Check out the scene on YouTube, which features our Centennial Station in all its glory.

February 01, 2013

Song of the Day #1093

Song of the Day: Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head, words and music by Burt Bacharach and the late Hal David, won the Oscar for Best Original Song from the Oscar-winning Best Original Score for the fun 1969 film, "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford. At the time, I was pissed that this song beat out one of my favorites of all time ("What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?"). But this was a #1Billboard hit by B. J. Thomas, and it's a great way to start off my annual tribute to my favorite movie music. Check out the track on YouTube.