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Anarchy and Dualism, Revisited

Geoffrey Allan Plauche over at Libertas revisits the subject of "Anarchy and Dualism" (which we'd discussed briefly here and here), mostly in response to a post by Billy Beck over at Two--Four.

Geoffrey discusses the fallacy of dualism, which I highlight in my own book Total Freedom: Toward a Dialectical Libertarianism. What is of interest to me is that even though I have viewed anarchists as creating a dualism between market and state, they themselves view the state as the source of social dualisms and conflict. One might say that they are motivated by a desire to resolve the very dualisms in social life that even nonanarchists decry. (I have argued that the anarchist resolution is not dialectical, but that's a separate issue.)

In any event, check out the relevant links above for some interesting discussion.

Comments welcome.

Comments

"What is of interest to me is that even though I have viewed anarchists as creating a dualism between market and state, they themselves view the state as the source of social dualisms and conflict. One might say that they are motivated by a desire to resolve the very dualisms in social life that even nonanarchists decry. (I have argued that the anarchist resolution is not dialectical, but that's a separate issue.)"

I totally agree, Chris, except with that last parenthetical remark. And I would add 'many' in between 'viewed' and 'anarchists'. Don't forget a lot of anarchists are not capitalists. Check out the addendum in my post for my response. :o)

Your points are well taken, as always. I, in turn, left you a comment, the essence of which I'd like to reproduce here as well:

I think what it all comes down to is that not enough libertarian anarchists are making the larger points about the personal, social, and cultural factors; in my experience, they have focused much too much on the elimination of the state as some kind of panacea. Rothbard himself used to talk quite a bit about how certain "praxeological" factors might push a society back down the "hegemonic" road. For me, it is those factors that need to be made part of the analysis... and part of the solution.

[Cross-posted]

I think we're definitely in agreement there. One of the benefits that I see in libertarian anarchism over libertarian minarchism is that it encourages one to look at and consider those sub-political factors instead of focusing one's attention on making changes only at the political level. Granted many have focused on economics and the market to the exclusion or negligence of the personal, social, and cultural. However, Rothbard's influence is still very fresh. While his insights are important and integral to a philosphy of liberty, hopefully as time passes more and more libertarian anarchists will begin to look at these other factors as well. I, for one, like you, will keep pushing for it.

Gennelmens,

I remark for you... or at you, or something.

Love ya both, bless your pointed heads.

While we're continuing in this "love-fest" :) ...
you guys compel me to say a lot more. Check out my newest post:

Dualism: A Difference with Distinction