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Courses Taught by Prof. Dougherty
Linguistics Department
New York University

http://www.nyu.edu/pages/linguistics/courses

New York University | Linguistics Department
GENERAL || RESEARCH || COURSES || WORKBOOK|| FIRST DOT

The New York University Linguisics Department offers both undergraduate and graduate courses. For course offerings by other department members, look under their home pages.

CAVEAT: For all courses the definitive edition of the course is found in the hard copy pages distributed in class. These pages on the web are placed here by students working with Prof. Dougherty, see the HTML Gesellschaft. They are not always up to date. Please send any comments to Prof. Ray Dougherty.

In general, each course is defined by five on-line documents.

Some courses have some extra documents:

Some courses have the entire course description as a postscript document:


Undergraduate Courses of Prof. Dougherty

V61.0003. Communication: Men, Minds, and Machines.
Basics || Overview || Who's Who || Syllabus || Project || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

V61.0024. Computational Principles of Sentence Construction.
Basics || Overview || What Will I Learn || Syllabus || Project || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

V61.0051. A Cultural History of Computers, Robots, and Artificial Intelligence.
Basics || Overview || Who's Who || Syllabus || Project || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

V61.0980 Internship. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or faculty sponsor.
Basics || Overview || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

V61.0997. Independent Study. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Basics || Overview || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

V61.####. Senior Honors Thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Basics || Overview || Postscript || Zipped Postscript


Graduate Courses of Prof. Dougherty

G61.1320. Evaluation of Linguistic Theories.
Basics || Overview || Syllabus || Project || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

G61.1710. Philosophical Foundations of Language Study.
Basics || Overview || Syllabus || Project || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

G61.1830. Introduction to Programming for Linguists.
Basics || Overview || Syllabus || Project || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

G61.2330 Proseminar. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Basics || Overview || Syllabus || Project || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

G61.2810. Computational Models of Language Acquisition.
Basics || Overview || Syllabus || Project || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

G61.2950. Computational Morphology.
Basics || Overview || Syllabus || Project || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

G61.3820. Seminar on Computational Models of Language.
Basics || Overview || Syllabus || Project || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

G61.3910. Directed Reading in Linguistics. Permission of the Chair and the instructor required.
Basics || Overview || Syllabus || Project || Postscript || Zipped Postscript

G61.3930. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. Permission of the Chair and the instructor required.
Basics || Overview || Postscript || Zipped Postscript


V610003. Communication: Men, Minds, and Machines. We examine how signs and symbols function in the communication of humans, primates, birds, computers, automata, simulata, etc., and discuss the definition of sign, intelligence, artificial intelligence, animal intelligence, mind, cognition, meaning, and so on. We concern ourselves with the matter expressed by the symbol system and with the manner in which the matter is expressed: literally, abstractly metaphorically, as a simile, by insinuation, and other methods. This course is taught in alternative years. It alternates with V61.0051, A Cultural History of Computers, Robots, and Artificial Intelligence, LEP 3. V61.0051 covers the period from 300 B.C. until 1900. V61.0003 covers from about 1800 until today.


V61.0024. Computational Principles of Sentence Construction
This class introduces students to the basic computational tools available for formulating linguistic and psycho-linguistic models of competence and performance. We will discuss classical problems in perception and description of verb particle constructions, questions, passives and garden path sentences. Formulations will be in Chomsky's grammar (Minimalism), GPSG, HPSG, and LFG. We will consider how parsers operate in structurally different languages such as Chinese, English, French, and German. Students will learn sufficient computer skills (Unix, lisp, and Prolog) to run programs that model a human being's language production and perception capacities. Students will have computer accounts in the PC Lab and on a Unix system and obtain hands on experience with artificial intelligence and expert systems programs using symbolic logical based computer languages. Students will use the World Wide Web and the Internet. Students may base their research on existing programs or they may write their own.


V61.0051. The Cultural History of Computers, Robots, and Artificial Intelligence. The course introduces students to primary source materials on the mind/body problem and on linguistic criteria for intelligence starting from about 1600 (Galileo and Descartes) to the current day. The main emphasis is on the origins of the mind/body problem and on the mechanical analogies of mind developed since 1500. Students read materials by Galileo, Descartes, Voltaire, Huxley, Darwin, Arnauld, and others. The focus of the class is on the study Cartesian Linguistics, 1966, by Noam Chomsky. We investigate his claim that the ideas about mind, language, and intelligence which are current today parallel closely those of the Cartesians in the 17th century. This course is taught in alternate years. It alternates with V61.0003, Communication: Men, Minds, and Machines, LEP3.


G61.1710. Philosophical Foundations of Language Study. The class will focus on Chomsky's concept of explanation in linguistics. We will consider his early definitions (1957,1965) of observational, descriptive, and explanatory adequacy and see how they have evolved into the underpinnings of the minimalist program. We will compare Chomsky's views of 'language,' 'scientific methodology,' 'explanation,' and 'theory justification' with those of Charles Sanders Peirce. We will discuss explanation deriving from external motivation (the relation of generative grammar to studies of perception, performance, parsing, language acquisition, and so on), and internal motivation (the ability of a theory/grammar to provide an insightful analysis of some distribution or interpretation of natural language data). We will discuss three types of constructions in order to see how they have been analyzed from pre-government and binding analyses into the minimalist program. The three constructions are:


G61.1830. Introduction to Computer Programming for Linguists
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the problems involved in implementing ideas about generative grammar, in particular the ideas of Noam Chomsky and the minimalist program, into a computer program in a logical constraint based system, in particular into Prolog, short for Programming in Logic. We assume that the student knows little, if anything, about computational linguistics, programming, Prolog, or Lisp. The majority of the linguistic examples center on the structure of the lexicon and the content of lexical items in a logical constraint based grammar in which all structure is projected from the lexicon by general logical principles and almost all constraints are defined on derivational principles not on structural configurations. This term we will write a Prolog computer program (lexicon and principles of combination) that will pair a time expression, such as on Monday July fourth nineteen hundred and seventy at six fifteen in the evening with a semantic/logical representation in terms of a twenty four hour clock and a twelve month solar calendar. We discuss computerized translations between languages with the same calendar (French, German, English) and languages with different (solar versus lunar) calendars, such as Hebrew and Chinese.


G61.2810. Computational Models of Language Acquisition.