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Waste Minimization

Where feasible, departments using toxic chemicals should introduce less toxic substitutes.

Chemicals should be purchased in quantities that can be used within a reasonable period of time. They should not be "stockpiled".

Experiments should be conducted on the smallest scale possible.

Where feasible, unused surplus chemicals should be redistributed to other chemical users within the University. Environmental Health and Safety (998-1450) is available to assist in this process.

Battery Recycling

Batteries are found in countless devices used across campus. Cordless power tools, laptop computers, cellular and cordless telephones, digital cameras, laboratory equipment, and many other hand held devices are used throughout campus facilities and departments. NYU recycles the following types of batteries: alkaline, nickel cadmium (Ni-Cad), nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH), lithium ion, sealed lead acid, and mercury. When broken, these batteries can release heavy metals that damage the environment.

Used batteries may be classified as hazardous waste due to their heavy metal content and are thus regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These regulations provide for management of hazardous wastes.

The Universal Waste Rule is designed to reduce regulatory management requirements. The University manages used batteries as universal waste. The Universal Waste Rule promotes pollution prevention and waste minimization by encouraging the recycling of used batteries instead of less desirable methods of disposal such as land filling or incineration.

Chemical Redistribution with Chemtracker

Chemtracker will allow laboratories to post unwanted unused inventories prior to disposal and possibly be redistributed. These chemicals will be materials in the original container with original labeling. The container may have been opened or never opened, half full or more, and must be uncontaminated. Please check within your department for unwanted, uncontaminated chemical material for redistribution before ordering new chemicals.

Fluorescent Bulb and Ballast Recycling

Fluorescent lamps illuminate countless classrooms, laboratories, and buildings on campus. HID lamps (mercury-vapor, metal-halide and high-pressure sodium) are used for streetlights, floodlights and shop lights. When broken, these lamps release mercury and other metals that damage the environment.

Used fluorescent and HID lamps may be classified as hazardous waste due to their mercury content and are thus regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These regulations provide for management of hazardous wastes.

The Universal Waste Rule is designed to reduce regulatory management requirements. The University manages used fluorescent lamps as universal waste. The Universal Waste Rule promotes pollution prevention and waste minimization by encouraging the recycling of used lamps instead of less desirable methods of disposal such as land filling or incineration.

Thermostats

Coming Soon

Computer and Electronic Equipment Recycling

Computer monitors contain materials that should be recycled. All computer components have changed over the years, but a PC today is typically 40 percent steel, 30 to 40 percent plastic, 10 percent aluminum and 10 percent other metals, including copper, gold, silver, cadmium and platinum. A monitor adds glass and lead to this total.

The Cathode Ray Tube or CRT is the viewing portion of computer monitors and televisions. The CRT contains hazardous material that needs to be recycled. In your discarded computer monitors there are traces of lead, phosphorus, cadmium, barium, and mercury. As a product, these hazardous materials are safely sealed. When the CRT is sent to the landfill the chance of breakage is very high, the hazardous materials may be released creating a potential hazard to workers and groundwater. Regulatory agencies, federal, state and city-wide, are now monitoring the disposal of CRT's and other computer equipment. The charges to recycle are minimal when compared to the potential liability from placing these CRT's in a landfill. No monitors shall be placed in a campus dumpster.

The University, through the efforts of Environmental Health and Safety Department, the Department of Asset Management, and Information Technology Services, has secured a vendor to recycle computer components instead of less desirable methods of disposal such as land filling or incineration.

Used Oil

Used oil can be a valuable resource when it is properly managed to avoid release to the environment and recycled for utilization of its lubricant or fuel value. The University also recognizes the need for waste minimization and proper management of used oil.

Used oil is defined as any oil that has been refined from crude oil, or synthetic, and has been used and as a result of such use is contaminated by physical or chemical impurities.

Used oil for recycling:

  • Lubricants
  • Hydraulic Fluids
  • Motor Oil
  • Metalworking Oil
  • Wire Drawing Solutions

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