Shipboard lecture during a Travel School excursion

Shipboard lecture during a Travel School excursion

In 1927, when Charles Lindbergh landed his monoplane outside Paris after his spectacular solo flight from New York, NYU students named him “the greatest living person.” And throughout the 1920s, the University’s students arrived in France too—but by ocean liner. In 1925, Dean James E. Lough of the Extra-Mural Division headed study travel courses which offered college credit to 213 students. The S.S. Orduna was chartered for the voyage, and special student third-class accommodations were offered, along with a chaperone (often the wife of the professor) for women students. In 1926 “Travel Courses” offered students a choice of spending 66 days in Dijon, Tours, or Paris, at a cost ranging from $395 to $550. Side trips (with lectures) included trips to cathedrals, castles, and battlefields.

< Previous Next >