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Storm Trojan Alert

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A new trojan horse virus known as Trojan.Peacomm and Storm Trojan is rapidly spreading. Symantec Security Response has seen a large increase in the number of infections of this Trojan as well as new versions that have additional capabilities. The Trojan horse arrives as an attachment to an email claiming to contain a video of one of several different recent news stories. To protect your computer, delete any suspicious messages without opening the attachment, and be sure to keep your virus definitions up to date.

The email itself will have no message body, but will have one of the following subject lines:

  • A killer at 11, he's free at 21 and kill again!
  • U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice has kicked German Chancellor Angela Merkel
  • British Muslims Genocide
  • Naked teens attack home director.
  • 230 dead as storm batters Europe.
  • Re: Your text
  • Radical Muslim drinking enemies's blood.
  • Chinese missile shot down Russian satellite
  • Chinese missile shot down Russian aircraft
  • Chinese missile shot down USA aircraft
  • Chinese missile shot down USA satellite
  • Russian missile shot down USA aircraft
  • Russian missile shot down USA satellite
  • Russian missile shot down Chinese aircraft
  • Russian missile shot down Chinese satellite
  • Saddam Hussein safe and sound!
  • Saddam Hussein alive!
  • Venezuelan leader: "Let's the War beginning".
  • Fidel Castro dead.

Symantec also strongly urges users to be cautious of any unsolicited email that contains attachments that claim to be legitimate or interesting. The technique of using interesting subject lines or attachment names in emails in order to distribute malicious code is known as "social engineering". This technique has been used by threat writers for many years and, unfortunately, is often successful against unprotected users. The usage of recent news events as part of the email is especially common among these techniques.

For more information about this and other virus threats, see the Symantec website.