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Ph.D. Program
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Graduate Program - Course Summaries
-Political Philosophy and Theory
-Political Methodology
-American Politics
-Political Economy
-Comparative Politics
-International Relations

Political Philosophy and Theory
Advisers: Brams, Hardin, Landa, Manin, Ollman.

History of Political and Social Thought (G53.1100) Core course. Landa, Manin, Ollman. 4 points. 
Syllabi: [Hardin S04] [Landa S05] [Manin F05] [Shaw 05]
Major political thinkers of past and present. Special reference to enduring problems in political theory.

Methods of Political and Social Analysis (G53.2106)
Ollman
. 4 points. 
Syllabi: [Ollman S06]
Nature and functions of theory, particularly Marxist dialectic, that attempt to analyze political phenomena systematically; historical, sociological, psychological, and phenomenological research; classical and current works.

Math and Democracy: Designing Better Voting and Fair- Division Procedures (G53.2107)  4 points.
Syllabi: [Brams S07]
This course analyzes democratic procedures, or rules of play, that (1) reflect the interests of the citizens in elections and (2) respect due process and rule of law in the fair division of public and private goods. By making precise the properties of these procedures and clarifying trade-offs among them, mathematics strengthens the intellectual foundations of democratic institutions. While mathematical training will be helpful in understanding some topics in the course, more important is the ability to think carefully and rigorously about the nature of democracy and its institutions.

Communism (G53.2140), Ollman. 4 points. Last taught Fall 2004.
Syllabi: [Ollman F04]
Fundamentals of modern communist thought; writings of Marx, Engels, Lenin, and their major critics. Emphasis is on communism as the unrealized potential of capitalism and therefore more on what in capitalism suggests this potential and less on the precapitalist societies that called themselves "communist."

Seminar in Political Theory (G53.3100, 3101) 4 points.
Required of all Ph.D. candidates majoring in political theory.
Syllabi: [Manin F06] [Hardin S05] [Pasquino F04] [Manin F03] [Holmes S03] [Hardin F02]
General seminar in political philosophy. The specific topic of the seminar varies, but this is an advanced seminar that assumes extensive background.

Political Methodology
Advisers: Beck, Brams, Cohen, Dickson, Downs, Gilligan, Gordon, Hafer, Landa, Morton, Nagler, Przeworski, Smith, Wantchekon.

Approaches to Political Inquiry (G53.1000) Core course. Cohen. 4 points. 
Syllabi: [Cohen F02]
Comprehensive survey of modern research techniques. Reviews competing approaches to political research. Evaluates strengths and weaknesses of alternative methods of dealing with various problems of political research.

Mathematics for Political Scientists (G53.1110), Cohen, Hafer. 4 points. Last taught Fall 2004.
(This course is normally open only to Politics PhD students.)

Syllabi: [Dickson F04] [Hafer F03]
Covers basic topics of mathematics- calculus, analytic geometry, matrix algebra, etc.-with wide application in political science.

Introduction to Quantitative Political Analysis I (G53.1120), MA Only.  Cohen. 4 points. Last taught Fall 2004.
Syllabi: [Cohen F02]
Introduces elementary statistical analysis and prepares the student for G53.2127. Topics include probability theory, distribution theory, estimation of simple statistical models, and hypothesis testing.

Quantitative Research in Political Science I (G53.1150), Beck, Hirano, Nagler. 4 points.
(This course is normally open only to Politics PhD students.)

Syllabi: [Nagler F05]
Formal Modeling in Political Science (G53.2105), Brams. 4 points. Last taught Fall 2004.
Syllabi: [Brams F04]
Introduction to formal modeling and deductive theorizing. Main tools of analysis used are decision theory, game theory, and social choice theory.

Methods of Political and Social Analysis (G53.2106) Last taught Spring 2004.
Syllabi: [Ollman S03]
See description under Political Philosophy and Theory.

Game Theory and Politics (G53.2108) Hafer, Smith. 4 points. 
(This course is normally open only to Politics PhD students.)

Prerequisite: one course in statistics or formal modeling.
Syllabi: [Hafer S03] [Smith S04] [Jones S06 (M.A.)] [Dickson S06 (Ph.D.)] [Smith S07]
Survey of the main concepts and findings of game theory that are relevant to the study of politics.

Quantitative Research in Political Science II (G53.2125), Beck, Hirano, Nagler 4 points.
Prerequisite: G53.1150 or permission of instructor.
Syllabi: [ Beck S06] [Nagler S03]

Quantitative Research in Political Science III (G53.xxxx)
Prerequisite: 
Syllabi: [Beck F07]
The course is continuation of Quantitative Research in Political Science II. It includes an extended treatment of time series and time-series-cross-sectional data, along with a treatment of spatial data analysis. Attention then turns to modern Bayesian methods and ideas.  There is room at the end of the course for topics of interest to the class to be covered.

The course assumes students have had the Politics Department basic series of quantitative courses, that is, Quantitative Research in Political Science I and II.

Introduction to Quantitative Political Analysis II (G53.2127), MA Only Cohen. 4 points. 
Syllabi: [Cohen F06]
Builds on G53.1120. Provides working knowledge of some of the quantitative methods used in political science research. Emphasis is on using and critiquing the general linear model. Introduction to categorical data analysis and research methodology.

Statistical Methods for Comparative Research (G53.2129), Przeworski. 4 points.
Syllabi: [Przeworski S05] Last taught Spring 2005.
Covers statistical models of discrete and limited dependent variables leading to the problem of nonrandom selection and appropriate ways of handling it. Focuses on selection models, using probit, logit, and tobit analysis and applying them to the origins of democracy and the impact of political regimes and institutions.

Seminar in Political Methodology (G53.3200, 3201) 4 points. 
Required of all Ph.D. candidates majoring in political methodology.
Syllabi: [Dickson F05] [Hafer S03]
The specific topic of the seminar varies, but this is an advanced seminar requiring extensive background.

American Politics
Advisers: Beck, Gordon, Harrington, Harvey, Mead, Morton, Nagler, Randall.

American Political Institutions and Processes (G53.1300) Core course. Gordon, Harvey, Mead, Morton. 4 points. 
[Morton S06] [R. Smith F05 (M.A.)] [Gordon S05]
Overview of public policymaking process; political participation, organization, and structure; governmental institutions.

The Domestic Politics of the United States I (G53.1350) Core course. 4 points.
Syllabi:
This course provides graduate students with a broad overview of important topics in the study of the domestic politics in the United States.  The course will examine in depth the analysis and merits of a selection of contemporary research on political participation, mass opinion, elections, legislative politics, inter-branch relations,bureaucratic politics, judicial politics, federalism, inequality, and the role of money in politics. The course goals are to first, introduce students to important controversies in the study of American domestic politics; and second, to encourage students to think rigorously about the process of conducting political research.

American Legislative System (G53.2302), Gordon. 4 points. Last taught prior to Fall 2000.
Syllabi:
Theory of councils and representation, legislative structures and behavior, reform of representative government.

American Political Parties (G53.2320), Harvey. 4 points. Last taught Spring 2001.
Syllabi: [Harvey S00]
Major and minor American parties; varieties of state and local systems; leadership patterns, structural characteristics, roles, functions, and behavior of electorate.

Campaigns and Elections (G53.2324), Harvey, Nagler. 4 points. 
Syllabi: [Weissburg S06] [Pomper S05] [Nagler S01][Weissberg S07]
Analysis of U.S. election processes through theoretical and practical approaches to the study of voting, campaigns, and elections. Studies role of parties, pressure groups, media, polls, etc.

Public Policy (G53.2371), Mead. 4 points. Last taught Fall 2004.
Syllabi: [Mead F04] [Mead F03]
Advanced-level study of policymaking process in federal politics and research issues raised by it. Emphasis is on interaction of policy analysis and political institutions. Some prior knowledge of public policy is assumed.

Seminar in American Government and Politics (G53.3300, 3301) 4 points. Last taught Fall 2004.
Required of all Ph.D. candidates majoring in American politics.
Syllabi: [Gordon S03]
General seminar in American government. The specific topic of the seminar varies, but this is an advanced seminar requiring extensive background.

Political Economy
Advisers: Brams, Denoon, Downs, Gilligan, Gordon, Hafer, McGillivary, Przeworski, Smith, Wantchekon.

Political Economy (G53.1400) Core course. Denoon, Przeworksi. 4 points. 
Syllabi: [Wantchekon F04] [Kingsley F04 (M.A.)] [Hafer S06] [Hafer S07]
Overview of the emerging field of political economy. Surveys three broad intellectual traditions prominent in the political economy literature: (1) the application of microeconomic, game theoretic, and public choice theory to politics, (2) a focus on institutions and the behavior of their related politics, and (3) Marxian and neo-Marxian approaches. The course requires an understanding of basic microeconomics.

Politics of Economic Growth (G53.2424), Przeworski. 4 points. 
Syllabi: [Przeworski F05] [Schain S03]
Introduction to growth economics, the impact of intracountry inequality on growth, the effects of voter preferences and government policies on economic growth. Knowledge of some economics (microeconomics with calculus), game-theory (perfect Bayesian equilibrium), and statistics (OLS) is assumed.

Seminar in Political Economy (G53.3400, 3401) 4 points. Last taught Spring 2006.
Required of all Ph.D. candidates majoring in political economy.
Syllabi: [Przeworski F03] [Schain S02] [Iskander S06] [Wantchekon S06]
General seminar in political economy. The specific topic of the seminar varies, but this is an advanced seminar that assumes extensive background.

Note: In addition to the required core course and seminar, courses toward a major or minor overlap with, and are drawn from, the remaining five fields. These courses are listed below. For course descriptions, refer to entries by number within the other field listings. Other courses may be included with the approval of the director of graduate studies.

Formal Modeling in Political Science (G53.2105), Brams. Last taught Fall 2004.
Syllabi: [Brams F03]

Game Theory 1 (G53.xxxx)
Prerequisites: G53.1110 Mathematics for Political Scientists or
equivalent.

Syllabi: [Dickson F07]

This course is designed to provide a thorough and technically rigorous introduction to non-cooperative game theory for political science PhD students.  The objective of the course is to cover the basic concepts of non-cooperative game theory rigorously, as well as applications in many different fields of political science.
Game Theory 2 (G53.xxxx)
Prerequisites: G53.1110 Mathematics for Political Scientists and
Game Theory I, or equivalent.

Syllabi: [Hafer F07]

This course focuses on canonical games of incomplete information that are used widely in all fields of political science and political economy, e.g. signaling games, cheap-talk games, and wars of attrition. It will also introduce PhD students to theoretical topics that play a prominent role in recent contributions to the political science literature. The course is suitable for students who, in the course of
their own research, wish to evaluate, critique, or otherwise engage formal-theoretic work
Social Choice and Political Economy  (G53.xxxx).
Syllabi:

A formal theoretical analysis of social choice, aggregation of preferences, collective decision making and the spatial model of politics, with applications to the study of the electoral competition and the determination of economic policies.
Topics in Formal Models of Political Economy. (G53.xxxx)
Syllabi:

This class focuses on a particular substantive topic in political
economy using formal models, which varies with the interest of
students and instructors.
Analytical Introduction to Political Economy (G53.2502), Przeworski. Last taught prior to Fall 2000.
Syllabi:

International Governance (G53.2736), Hsiung.
Syllabi: [Hsiung S06 ]

This course approaches international governance both as (a) an emergent focus of research in the international relations (IR) field, and (b) an explication of the utility of international regimes and institutions in achieving public goods – e.g., the orderly exchange of values, and maintenance of peace & stability -- through collective action in lieu of unilateral self-help.

The Political Economy of North- South Relations (G53.2770), Denoon. Last taught Fall 2004.
Syllabi: [Denoon F04]

The Political Economy of the Pacific Basin (G53.2774), Denoon. Last taught Fall 2005.
Syllabi: [Denoon F05]

International Political Economy (G53.2775), Gilligan. Last taught Spring 2006.
Syllabi: [Satyanath S05] [Stasavage S06]

International Organization (G53.2800), Downs, Gilligan. Last taught Summer 2004.
Syllabi: [Gilligan F02] [Downs S00]

Comparative Politics
Advisers: Cohen, Denoon, Hsiung, Kazemi, McGillivary, C. Mitchell, T. Mitchell, Przeworski, Schain, Wantchekon.

Comparative Politics (G53.1500) Core course. Cohen, T. Mitchell, Schain, . 4 points. 
Syllabi: [Entelis F05 (M.A.)] [Wantchekon F05] [Laver S06] [Entelis S06] [Wantchekon F06] [Laver S07]
Basic approaches to comparative political inquiry and the application of these approaches to specific problems of political analysis. Understanding of political phenomena in a comparative perspective.

Comparative Politics of Industrialized Democracies (G53.1550) Core course. 4 points.
Syllabi: [Laver S07]
This course is designed as an introduction to the comparative study of politics in different institutional and cultural settings. Themes covered will include: the role of institutional "veto players"; presidential and parliamentary government; bicameral and unicameral legislatures; the institutional structuring of legislative decision-making; electoral systems; social capital/civic culture; social and political cleavages; dimensions of policy and ideology; voting; party competition; and the making and breaking of governments.

Comparative Politics of Developing Countries (G53.1551) Core course. 4 points.
Syllabi:
This course introduces students to the methodology and to some of the main themes in comparative politics of developing countries. The aim of the course is to prepare students to do comparative research through an in-depth coverage of current debate in comparative politics of developing countries and an introduction to the main methodological approaches.

French Politics, Society, and Culture (G53.2524 Identical to G46.1710). 4 points. Last taught Fall 2004.
Syllabi: [Schain S04]
Emphasis is on political institutions, beliefs, and behavior in their social and cultural setting. Longevity of centralization, myth of the public good, and the quest for accountable and stable government are among the subjects examined.

Politics of Caribbean Nations (G53.2532), C. Mitchell. 4 points. Last taught Fall 2004.
Syllabi:
Political development in major Caribbean societies. Outside influences (colonialism, trade, cultural forces, military intervention) are dealt with as a means to understanding general political trends in the region.

Collective Action and Social Movements (G53.2533), . 4 points. Last taught Spring 2001.
Syllabi: [Wood S01]
The principal approaches (including rational choice, culturalist, and structuralist approaches) to the explanation of collective action and social movements. Drawing on literature in political science, anthropology, economics, and sociology, the course readings include theoretical works as well as case studies. Participants also discuss the relationship between theory and method in each approach.

The Political Economy of Development (G53.2536), . 4 points. Last taught Spring 2005. [Kingsley S05]
Syllabi:
Assesses the issues and debates in the current literature on the political economy of development; analyzes principal characteristics of the contemporary world economy, especially patterns of inequality and the varying explanations for their emergence.

Government and Politics of Northern Africa (G53.2540), T. Mitchell. 4 points. Last taught Spring 2001.
Syllabi:
Comparative analysis of selected aspects of state formation, political identity, development, and political discourse in the countries of Arab North Africa.

Middle Eastern Government and Politics (G53.2590), Kazemi, T. Mitchell. 4 points. 
Syllabi: [Kazemi F05] [T. Mitchell F02]
Political analysis of the Middle East, covering such issues as class and state formation, political economy of oil, problems of development, rural and urban politics, regional conflict, politics of gender, and religious identity.

Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Politics (G53.2620), Cohen, C. Mitchell. 4 points. Last taught Fall 2004.
Syllabi:
Specific subject matter varies from semester to semester. Topics may include politics of the Andean region, urban politics in Latin America, Brazilian politics, and redemocratization of Latin America.

Latin American Government and Politics (G53.2621), Cohen, C. Mitchell. 4 points. Last taught Spring 2006.
Syllabi: [C. Mitchell S06] [Navia S03]
Major forces affecting political development of Latin America; different approaches to comparative politics as applied to this area, with focused case studies pursued in detail.

Seminar in Comparative Politics (G53.3500, 3501) 4 points.
Required of all Ph.D. candidates majoring in comparative politics.
Syllabi: [Laver F05] [Eggertsson S04] [Wantchekon F03] [Przeworski S06] [Mitchell S06] [Eggertsson S07]
General seminar in comparative politics. The specific topic of the seminar varies, but this is an advanced seminar requiring extensive background.


International Relations
Advisers: Brams, Bueno de Mesquita, Denoon, Downs, Gilligan, Hsiung, Kazemi, C. Mitchell, T. Mitchell, Schain, Smith.

International Politics: Concepts and Theories (G53.1700) Core course. Gilligan, Hsiung, Satyanath. 4 points. Last taught Spring 2006.
Syllabi: [BDM S06] [Rama S06 (M.A.) ] [Anderson S05 (M.A.)] [Flibbert S04 (M.A.)] [Satyanath F02]
Objectives and scope of studies of international politics, research problems, global models of political action and reaction.

Normative Issues in International Politics (G53.1730) 4 points.
For M.A. students only. 
Syllabi: [Rosenthal S06]
What values guide us as we make choices about using force, ending conflict, protecting human rights, promoting social justice, preserving the environment, and participating in international organizations? This course is designed to provide analytical rigor to the perennial question: What role does ethics play in the conduct of foreign affairs? Principles of realism, liberalism, cosmopolitanism, communitarianism, and supranationalism are considered in light of specific case studies.

Topics in International Organization (G53.1731-1735) 4 points.
For M.A. students only. 
Syllabi: [Cheema F05] [Aksoy S05]
Introduction to the practice of policymaking in the United Nations system. Taught by practitioners from the United Nations, its affiliated agencies, and regional subgroups, and, in some cases, related nongovernmental organizations. Topics change depending on the expertise of the practitioner teaching the course. Examples include peacekeeping operations, humanitarian assistance, regional integration, or economic development. Note: Ph.D. students may not take this course.

International Relations: Conflict (G53.1751) Core course. 4 points.
Syllabi:
This graduate course surveys modern approaches to the study on international conflict. Emphasis is placed on rigorous scientific approaches which use models to derive testable implication as to conflict relations.

Strategy and Defense Policy (G53.2701), Bueno de Mesquita. 4 points. 
Syllabi: [Bueno de Mesquita S03] [Bueno de Mesquita S07]
Introductory course that examines the historical roots of strategic doctrine in the 20th century and contemporary nuclear and conventional defense. Also covers arms control and disarmament problems.

Diplomacy and Negotiation (G53.2704), Brams. 4 points. Last taught prior to Fall 2000.
Syllabi:
Analysis of negotiation and diplomatic processes based on an examination of different approaches (e.g., game-theoretic and cultural); application to specific cases.

Foreign Policy Decision Making (G53.2725) 4 points. Last taught Summer 2004.
Syllabi:
Theory and practice of foreign policy decision making. Quantitative and formal methodologies used for three levels of analysis: individual choice and both intraorganizational and interorganizational (or governmental) decision processes.

U.S. Foreign Policy (G53.2750), Denoon. 4 points.
Syllabi: [Denoon S06]
American foreign policy and the major international problems facing the United States today.

Contemporary Inter-American Relations (G53.2765 Identical to G10.1004), C. Mitchell. 4 points. 
Syllabi: [C. Mitchell F04]
U.S. corporate and governmental policy toward Latin America; trends in Latin American and Caribbean migration to the United States; strategies of resource-rich Latin American nations toward technology-rich United States.

The Political Economy of North- South Relations (G53.2770 Identical to G31.2610), Denoon. 4 points. Last taught Fall 2004.
Syllabi: [Denoon F02]
Major issues involved in restructuring the international economic system. Analyzes initiatives of the Western, Socialist, and developing countries. Emphasis is on trade and monetary questions. Acquaintance with international politics and economics is necessary.

The Political Economy of the Pacific Basin (G53.2774 Identical to G31.2620), Denoon. 4 points. Last taught Spring 2004.
Syllabi: [Denoon F03]
Evaluates recent trends in East Asian and Pacific economic and political developments. The character of economic growth, the nature of the political systems, and implications of recent dynamism. Overall trends are analyzed with discussion focused on three distinct regions: Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands.

International Political Economy (G53.2775), Gilligan. 4 points. Last taught Fall 2004.
Syllabi: [Satyanath S02]
A general introduction to the field: evolution of the international political economy, international cooperation, international institutions, international trade and finance policy, macroeconomic policy coordination.

International Organization (G53.2800), Downs, Gilligan, Hsiung. 4 points. Last taught Summer 2004.
Syllabi: [Gilligan F02] [Downs S01]
Functions, operation, structure, and accomplishments of the United Nations and the specialized organizations. Emphasis is on international organization as an approach to peace.

International Law (G53.2900), Hsiung. 4 points.
Syllabi: [Hsiung F06]
Rules that govern in the legal relationship and current development of law among nations, based on the study of cases. The use of the law for the regulation of international behavior and environment.

Seminar in International Politics (G53.3700, 3701) 4 points. Last taught Spring 2006.
Required of all Ph.D. candidates majoring in international relations.
Syllabi: [Smith F02] [Downs S06]
General seminar in international politics. The specific topic of the seminar varies, but this is an advanced course requiring extensive background.

Courses listed with number G53.xxxx are listed pending formal approval.

List of Older Courses