RESEARCH SEMINAR ON
LANGUAGE AND MIND

Offered Spring 2003

Factually Questionable Discourse

The research seminar on Language and Mind will be conducted for the Spring of 2002 by Hartry Field and Stephen Schiffer. It will meet in the Philosophy Department on Tuesdays from 4:00 to 7:00 PM. (A preparation session restricted to students enrolled in the course will meet Mondays from 5:00 to 6:00.) Papers for discussion will be available one week in advance and will be distributed at the preceding seminar. They can also be picked up at the Department of Philosophy, Room 503, Silver Center (previously Main Building), 100 Washington Square East. Many of the papers will also be available on this web page by clicking on the title of the paper. Unless otherwise noted, these papers are in PDF form.

This year's topic is "Factually Questionable Discourse", discourse which, on the one hand, appears to involve true or false statements of fact but for which, on the other hand, there is reason to think that that appearance is misleading. Leading examples of factually questionable discourse are moral (and other evaluative) judgments, vagueness and indeterminacy, and conditionals.

Schedule of Visitors:

January 21, 2003:

Caroline West
University of Sydney

January 28, 2003:

Hartry Field
NYU

February 4, 2003:

William Lycan
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • "Background Handout";
  • "Chapter Four" of Real Conditionals;
  • "Chapter Eight" of Real Conditionals.
    NOTE: These electronic versions of chapter 4 and 8 of Real Conditionals have not ben proofread or copy-edited. Hardcopies of the copy-edited and proofread versions from Real Conditionals will be available at the preceding seminar and at the front desk of the Philosophy Department.

February 11, 2003:

Terence Horgan
University of Arizona
This session has been cancelled.

February 18, 2003:

Kit Fine
NYU

February 25, 2003:

David Wiggins
Oxford
  • Excerpts from Sameness and Substance Renewed (CUP, 2001). The designated reading is pp. 156-76. As background reading, he suggests the following further selections from the book in the following order: pp. 102-6; pp. 139-56; pp. 91-102; and pp. 225-44.

March 4, 2003:

Stephen Schiffer
NYU

March 11, 2003:

Tim Maudlin
Rutgers University
  • Truth and Paradox: Solving the Riddles. We will focus on the final chapter, chapter nine, particularly the material on pp. 282-302. Skimming chapters one through five may be helpful for understanding this chapter. The most important background material may be found in chapter three, and consists of pp. 48-54, 59-76, and 80-96. The title page and preface are also available.

March 25, 2003:

Stephen Yablo
MIT

April 1, 2003:

Cian Dorr
NYU

April 8, 2003:

Michael Resnik
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    Note: This session has been canceled.

April 15, 2003:

Dorothy Edgington
Birkbeck College, University of London

April 22, 2003:

Michael Smith
Austalian National University

April 29, 2003:

John Hawthorne
Rutgers University




updated 9/5/02
philo.web@nyu.edu