Arts of China Consortium

hosted by the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University









Conferences, Symposia, Workshops


Journals, Newsletters

Edited Volumes, Book Series

Listings below are organized chronologically by submission deadline; calls with no deadlines are at the bottom of list.

Third Annual Stanford-Berkeley Graduate Student Conference on Premodern Chinese Humanities

Stanford University
Stanford, CA
4-5 March 2016

[from MCLC, 9/25/15]

A joint organizing committee of Stanford University and UC Berkeley faculty announces the Third Annual Stanford-Berkeley Graduate Student Conference on Premodern Chinese Humanities, to be held on Friday, March 4 and Saturday, March 5, 2016, at Stanford. This national meeting of graduate students specializing in premodern Chinese studies aims to bring together young scholars from geographically distant institutions to present and discuss innovative research on China.

The conference will feature up to sixteen student presentations of original research on any aspect of premodern (technically, beginnings to 1911) Chinese humanistic culture, drawing on but not limited to the traditional disciplines of history, literature, religion, art, social sciences, and thought. We encourage proposals that explore new methodologies, utilize recent developments in digital technology, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary boundaries.

The conference will cover lodging expenses for the conference presenters, who are encouraged to seek the coverage of transportation costs from their home institutions or other sources. Confirmed presenters who demonstrate that no such funding is available may apply for a travel subsidy. Other interested students, at Stanford, Berkeley and beyond, are encouraged to attend. Conference registration is free.

Papers will be selected by a joint faculty-student committee of China specialists at the two institutions. Local faculty will serve as discussants for the selected papers. Applicants are strongly encouraged to present papers associated with ongoing or projected dissertation research.

To apply, submit a single-spaced 300-word paper proposal and short bio via our online submission system at

Proposals deadline: paper proposal and brief bio due November 20, 2015.
Notification of acceptance by December 11, 2015.
Full paper due February 19, 2016.

For inquiries, contact Ronald Egan or Yiqun Zhou.

back to page index

25th Annual Columbia Graduate Student Conference on East Asia

Columbia University
New York, NY
26-27 February 2016

[from MCLC, 10/26/15]

Graduate students (and qualified undergraduates) are invited to submit abstracts for the 25th Annual Columbia Graduate Student Conference on East Asia. This two-day conference—the oldest of its kind in the nation—provides students from institutions around the world with the chance to meet and share research with their peers. In addition, participants will gain valuable experience presenting their work through discussion with fellow graduate students as well as Columbia faculty.

We welcome applications from students engaged in research on all fields in East Asian Studies, including but not limited to: history, literature, art history, religion, sociology, archaeology, law, environmental studies, media studies, anthropology, political science, and economics. We especially encourage work that crosses national, temporal, and disciplinary boundaries to critically rethink the categories that both bind and sub-divide area studies.

Participants can take part in the conference as presenters or discussants. Presenters deliver a talk no longer than 15 minutes that summarizes research in progress. Discussants introduce the panelists, offer feedback, and facilitate the 20-minute discussion session following the presentations. Please indicate on your application which role(s) you are applying for.

Presentations may take three possible forms: a standard academic research paper, a Powerpoint presentation accompanied by a talk, or a work of documentary filmmaking. A documentary work should be 15 minutes or less, but if a student wishes to showcase a longer film, an entire panel slot will be devoted to it.

Finally, this year's committee encourages applications from pre-arranged panels of three to four presenters organized around a specific research topic, such as a region, discipline or theme. If you are applying as a pre-formed panel, please make sure to include a topic or tentative title for your panel on the application form. Preference will be given to such applications.

APPLICATIONS (due November 30th, 2015): Please fill out the application on with the required information. PLEASE NOTE: We will not accept presenter applications without abstracts. Successful applicants will be notified of acceptance early in January. Final Papers (5-7 pages maximum) are due January 16th, 2016.

*Please indicate any audiovisual equipment you will need for your presentation. Please note that our A/V resources are quite limited, and we may not be able to satisfy everyone's needs. Presenters must bring their own laptops and VGA adapters for computer presentations.

*Since presentations will be limited to 15 minutes, full-length research papers or theses will not be accepted. Presentations in any other format will also be restricted to 15 minutes. (Unless a full-length work of documentary film is submitted, in which an exception can be made.)

*Applicants who have not submitted final papers or projects will not be permitted to participate in the conference.

Housing will be available on a very limited basis, but we encourage everyone to arrange their own accommodations in advance. The conference runs from Friday afternoon to late Saturday evening. Travel and lodging information will be available soon on the conference website.

Nolan Bensen
Idriss Fofana
Sau-yi Fong
Benjamin Kindler
Nhat-Phuong Ngo-Vu

Graduate Student Conference on East Asia
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures
407 Kent Hall, Mail Code 3907
Columbia University
New York, NY 10027
fax (212) 678-8629

back to page index

Critical Asian Humanities graduate student conference

in conjunction with the second annual Critical Asian Humanities workshop
Duke University
Durham, NC
8 April 2016

[from MCLC, 10/6/15]

Duke University will host a select graduate student conference in conjunction with its second annual Critical Asian Humanities workshop, which will run from April 8th to April 9th, 2016. Integrating approaches and methodologies from cultural studies, critical theory, and area studies, Critical Asian Humanities is an interdisciplinary field that emphasizes humanistic inquiry while critically interrogating many of the assumptions on which the humanities have traditionally relied. The workshop's keynote speakers will be:

David Der-wei Wang (Harvard University), "Worlding Literary China: History, Literature and Chinese Modernity"
John Treat (Yale University), "Arendt in Asia: Judgment and Responsibility in Nanjing and Hiroshima"
Colleen Lye (University of California, Berkeley), "Asian American Sixties"
Closing remarks: Prasenjit Duara (Duke University)

The graduate student conference component of the workshop will feature papers by 4-6 graduate students, to be selected by a panel of Duke faculty and grad. students. Duke will cover the domestic travel and 3 days of room/board for the graduate students who are invited to speak.

Although the workshop does not have a formal theme, preference will be given to graduate student papers that complement the keynote speakers' focus on transregionalism and transnationalism. Students working on Asia in any discipline in the humanities or interpretive social sciences are welcome to apply.

Please send a 500-word abstract and brief biographical blurb to Carlos Rojas by December 1, 2015.

back to page index

"Creating Markets, Collecting Art"

London, UK
14-15 July 2015

[from Christie's Education, 10/15/15]

To commemorate the anniversary of the foundation of Christie's auction house in 1766, a two-day conference will be held at Christie's King Street, St James's. Organised by Christie's Education, the theme of "Creating Markets and Collecting Art" has been chosen to reflect a progressive, collaborative and cross-disciplinary approach to the study of works of art. The conference is designed to explore the interrelationship between commerce, collecting and the idea of the "academy," and how this has evolved over time.

Confirmed keynote speakers include Professor Craig Clunas, University of Oxford, and Inge Reist, Director of the Frick Collection's Center for the History of Collecting.

The conference comprises a mixture of academic sessions and panel discussions. Panel discussions will include a keynote panel, "Collecting for the Nation/Collecting for the Self," while others will focus on "The Future of the Art Market" and "Collecting, Curating and Exhibiting African Art." In addition to the panels, there will be twelve sessions running across three sites. The sessions will explore the idea of collecting--historically, theoretically and in a contemporary context.

We are now calling for papers for the sessions. Papers should be 20-25 minutes in length and there will be 3-4 in each 2 hour session, with time for discussion. Proposals should be accompanied by a brief biography and the whole submission not more than 250 words. Full details of sessions and convenors can be downloaded here [panels of possible interest to historians of Chinese art listed below].

Christie's and the Birth of the European Art Market
Session Convenor: Filip Vermeylen (Erasmus University)
The basic structure of today's global art market has its roots in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with the establishment of auction houses and art dealerships. These are fascinating times when the art markets of Europe were becoming inter-connected and the cross-border trade in works of art was expanding rapidly. Christie's in London was a prime mover of these developments, as the company fast rose to primacy after its inception in 1766. This session aims to explore how Christie's pioneering business practices were instrumental in shaping the London art market, and how the company was able to secure the sale of the most prominent art collections of the period. The session thereby addresses one of the seminal themes of the conference by examining how intermediaries in the art ecosystems may have shaped national tastes in the visual arts in the early years of Christie's, and how this relates to the business models of the major auction houses in the contemporary art market. In addition, the internationalization of the art trade invites interesting comparisons with today's emerging art markets.

The Salesroom as Social-Cultural Space
Session Convenor: Anne Helmreich (Texas Christian University)
The commercial art gallery and auction house, arguably the most visible component of the modern art market, developed ostensibly as a means of facilitating fiscal transactions, bringing together sellers, buyers, and objects. But it is impossible, this session argues, to regard these spaces as purely transactional because they also functioned as spaces of social-cultural formation and exchange. Indeed, some of the earliest visual representations of Western European salesrooms focus on the sociability of these spaces, which functioned as sites of display for both objects and people. Such images register the gradual expansion of the art market to serve a broader range of social classes, but such processes were neither smooth nor uncontested. Such questions concerning the intended audience(s) of the salesroom are underscored by the history of the built environment of the commercial art gallery and auction house. The histories of locales and physical contexts, both exterior and interior, reveal the changing status of these spaces. The formation of these spaces and the strategies of display deployed therein cannot be separated from the objects circulating through these spaces. What was the dynamic interaction between objects and spaces, as well as the dynamic interaction between objects and people facilitated by such spaces? This structural triad of objects, people, and space was mediated and activated by speech acts and texts, such as catalogues. These materials compose the epistemological origins or building blocks of art history. Therefore, understanding the salesroom as a social-cultural space shapes our histories of not only the art market but also the discipline of art history. This session seeks innovative papers that study the salesroom as a social-cultural space, establishing arguments on rigorously analyzed evidence and carefully considered methodological frameworks, eschewing an anecdotal approach.

Home Subjects: The Art Market and the Domestic Sphere in Britain
Session Convenors: Anne Nellis Richter (American University) and Morna O'Neill (Wake Forest University)
The commonly-held assumption that the English style of living is intertwined with tastes in collecting and patronage can be traced back centuries. In the 1790s, for example, when important Italian paintings were being imported into Britain during the French Revolution, the idea that such pictures might be unsuitable for English collectors and houses gained a certain currency. One critic wrote, "A most puerile objection is… made against the pictures of Paul Veronese, because…they cannot be admitted into our London houses." The decoration of the private home has become the focus of a tremendous amount of academic energy during the past five years. What is missing from these accounts, however, is a consideration of the vital role that the art market played in enabling the decoration of interiors at all social ranks. This session seeks to reconsider the relationship between the art market and the domestic sphere in the eighteenth through early twentieth centuries. We welcome proposals that explore the complicated set of expectations governing the acquisition and sale of artworks intended for private display, including but not limited to the role of the art dealer as interior decorator, the auction "house" and the domestic ideal, and the relationship between private and public modes of display and decoration, plotting a new trajectory for modernity traced through the private, domestic sphere.

"Nothing like the real thing!" Connoisseurship; Dead or Alive in the Digital Age?
Session Convenor: Elizabeth Herridge (arts and arts management consultant)
Once a vital component as a determinant of value, has the practice of connoisseurship in the art and auction market been subsumed by technology and diminished through easy access to electronic images of artworks? Or are we perhaps witnessing the development of a new methodology, a new kind of connoisseurship for the digital age? This session will explore issues related to the changing definition, value and practice of connoisseurship from the eighteenth century to the present day and its impact on the art and auction market. We will explore whether its definition has changed over time, as well as its function in determining authenticity and value. The role of technology in terms of the accessibility of visual media platforms and their use by collectors and professionals in the art world will be examined in this context. We will explore the experience produced through the use of electronic platforms and the judgments that they might facilitate in the viewer. Fundamentally, we will consider whether a new kind of methodology or approach to Connoisseurship is developing through the use of these platforms. The larger question of whether it is still necessary to look at art in person or if an electronic image is an acceptable substitute will be discussed. Finally, if we believe the premise that there is "nothing like the real thing," and that art must be viewed in person and not through the lens of technology, then what is its value in the art and auction market in the digital age?

Priceless: The Value of the Invaluable
Session Convenors: Jan Dirk Baetens (Radboud University Nijmegen) and Helleke van den Braber (Radboud University Nijmegen)
"Priceless is the invaluable, the object that is beyond any price. Priceless is, paradoxically, also the very costly object, which more than any other object is defined by its price. In a sense, therefore, the priceless or the invaluable seems to equal the pricy or the valuable." Ever since Pierre Bourdieu's seminal analysis of the "field of cultural production," the denial of art's commercial dimension that lies at the heart of the cultural field's auto-rhetoric has been explored by many scholars of the art market. Their studies have demonstrated that the notion of pricelessness, i.e., the (alleged) impossibility to translate a work of art's artistic merits to commercial value, is central to the paradox of many market strategies and, perhaps, even to the market itself. Indeed the construction, by the art market's various agents, of the artistic sphere as autonomous and beyond economic value, whence commerce is radically banished, typically results in precisely the opposite: the creation of commercial value. Yet the strategies to create commercial value by means of its denial are many and diverse: different actors (artists, dealers and other middlemen, curators, auctioneers, collectors, critics) engage in the discourse of "the valuable invaluable" in many different ways and media (journals, newspapers, catalogues, other publications, ego documents, personal exchanges, exhibition displays, social rituals, the artistic object itself) and in many different temporal and geographical contexts. Other strategies and contexts are at odds with the logic of "the valuable invaluable," thus clearly showing that this logic is a cultural construction which is both time- and site-specific. This session aims to bring together case studies from a wide array of different temporal, geographical and artistic contexts, in order to explore the myriad ways in which the notion of the invaluable has been, and is, construed and translated to commercial value, as well as case studies of alternative or subdominant discourses and strategies that run counter to this (il)logic.

Collectors of Contemporary Art: Tastemakers or Market Makers?
Session Convenor: Véronique Chagnon-Burke (Christie's Education)
Every summer for the last 24 years, ArtNews has published the ranking of the top two hundred collectors; a quick glance at the list reveals that a large number of these collectors are focusing either on modern and contemporary art or increasingly solely on contemporary art. If we understand the art world as a microcosm or a network of dependencies between a set of players who range from artists and critics to art dealers, collectors, curators, museum directors, auction houses and art historians; is it right to propose that at this particular moment in time, collectors are the authoritative voice in defining contemporary art? For the sake of the discussion, we have chosen to understand contemporary art as a loose category represented by artists from the end of the 20th century such as Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat as well as by living artists. The goal of the session is to provide insights on the role played by contemporary art collectors in the global art world and to assess if they are indeed the main taste and market makers. It hopes to contribute to renewed academic interest in collectors that institutions like the Frick Collection Center for the History of Collecting have been fostering. The following themes and questions represent some of the themes that could be addressed:
- Can we understand the rise of private museums as a manifestation of the collectors' taste making power?
- Matronage: the role of women collectors.
- What role does the collector play in bringing emerging artists into the main stream?
- Do collectors have the authority to make markets or/and to inscribe the artists in the canon of art history?
- Who are the "glocal" collectors?

Moving Objects: Representations of Chinese Art in Europe
Session Convenors: Nixi Cura (Christie's Education) and Monica Merlin (Christie's Education)
The acquisition, exchange and connoisseurship of Chinese art long predate the very modern construction of the category "Chinese art." Since early imperial China, the concept of cang (store/hide/treasure) developed within complex circuits of production and consumption, which in the modern era assimilated and adapted European modes of collection and display. Conversely, Chinese objects transferred, collected and exhibited in Europe generated new frameworks of viewing and understanding Chinese art. This session seeks to explore how practices in Europe informed and shaped the meanings, interpretations and definitions of Chinese art and its histories. Papers employing diverse theoretical frameworks could address the following questions:
- How have collecting and display strategies in Europe created alternative places and spaces for the appreciation and presentation of Chinese art?
- How has European literature around Chinese objects (e.g., accounts of China, fiction, histories of art, archives, exhibition and sale catalogues) formed perceptions of Chinese art?
- To what extent have dealers and the art market changed notions of Chinese art? How have social networks mobilised around the taste for and knowledge of Chinese art?

Please send your proposal to the Session Convenor/s listed at the top of each Session by 7 December 2015. Papers should be 20-25 minutes in length and there will be 3-4 in each 2-hour session, with time for discussion. Proposals should be accompanied by a brief biography, and the whole submission not more than 250 words.

Please also cc: your proposal to

back to page index

Bochumer Jahrbuch zur Ostasienforschung (Bochum Yearbook of East Asian Studies)

[courtesy of EACS, 10/10/15]

The Bochum Yearbook of East Asian Studies (Bochumer Jahrbuch zur Ostasienforschung) is now accepting submissions for edition 39, which will appear in Winter 2016.

The Bochum Yearbook has been published since 1978 by the Faculty of East Asian Studies at Ruhr-Universität Bochum. It serves as an international forum for academic publications on East Asian research, with individual research papers making up the larger part of the journal. Alongside these, each edition has a special theme. The authors of the essays in this section are invited and supported by a guest editor.

To get an idea of the scope of topics and research approaches that have received coverage in the Bochum Yearbook, please view the titles of back issues at

The editors now invite submission of papers for the main section of the journal, in either German or English, by March 1, 2016. Authors are kindly requested to use the BJOAF template.

All papers submitted for publication will undergo double-blind peer review.

Previously published papers will not be accepted.

Please send your paper as an e-mail attachment to

back to page index

Bulletin of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities

[from MFEA, 6/12/10]

The BMFEA publishes articles by scholars worldwide on all aspects of ancient and classical East Asia and adjacent regions, including archaeology, art, and architecture; history and philosophy; literature and linguistics; and related fields.

Contributions seriously engaging contemporary critical thought in the humanities and social sciences are especially welcome.

All contributions, for general issues as well as for special thematic issues, are peer-reviewed. The BMFEA Editorial Advisory Board mainly consists of scholars based at European centers for Asia research. Please note that no new manuscripts are reviewed for publication until June 2010. The editor is Martin Svensson Ekström, Associate Professor, Stockholm University (

back to page index

"Asia Past and Present: New Research from AAS"

[from AAS, 3/17/10]

The Association for Asian Studies announces a new scholarly book series—"Asia Past and Present: New Research from AAS"—to be published under the Association's own imprint. The series will be overseen by the AAS Editorial Board and the Series Editor, Martha Ann Selby, professor of Asian Studies at the University of Texas, Austin.

AAS expects to publish 2–3 books a year, each of them fully refereed and selected on the basis of exemplary, original, and enduring scholarship.

Submissions in all areas of Asian studies are welcome. AAS particularly hopes to support work in emerging or under-represented fields, such as South Asia, premodern Asia, language and literature, art history, and literary criticism. In addition to monographs, other forms of scholarly research—such as essay collections and translations—will be considered.

Authors interested in publishing in this new series should first consult the "Author Guidelines" and then e-mail excerpts of their manuscript (10,000–15,000 words, including a full Table of Contents and a representative sample chapter) along with a completed "Author Questionnaire" to Jonathan Wilson, AAS Publications Manager.

If, after initial evaluation by the series editor, your manuscript is selected to be sent for review, you must at that time be prepared to provide a complete manuscript. Only complete manuscripts will be reviewed. Completed manuscripts should adhere to the "Author Guidelines."

Authors must be current members of AAS at the time of submitting their initial manuscript excerpts for evaluation. In the case of edited volumes with multiple editors, if your manuscript is selected for review, each editor must hold AAS membership at the time of full manuscript submission (this requirement does not apply to contributors/single chapter authors).

For further information, please contact the Series Editor, Martha Ann Selby, or AAS Publications Manager, Jonathan Wilson.

back to page index

RIHA Journal

[from H-Arthist, 4/14/10]

RIHA, the International Association of Research Institutes in the History of Art, is pleased to announce the launch of RIHA Journal, the new international online-journal for the history of art, on April 14, 2010. A joint project of 27 institutes in 18 countries, the journal provides an excellent medium for fostering international discourse among scholars. Funding is provided by the German Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media (Beauftragter der Bundesregierung für Kultur und Medien, BKM).

RIHA Journal features research articles in either English, French, German, Italian, or Spanish, and invites submissions on the whole range of art historical topics and approaches. Manuscripts undergo a double blind peer review process and are published within few months from submission.

A not-for-profit e-journal committed to the principles of Open Access, RIHA Journal makes all articles available free of charge.

RIHA Journal welcomes submissions at any time. Please contact the RIHA institute in your country and/or field of expertise, or the managing editor.

Managing Editor:
Regina Wenninger
Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte
Meiserstraße 10
D?80333 München

back to page index

Journal of Central Asian and the Caucasian Studies

[from H-ASIA, 7/12/10]

Journal of Central Asia and the Caucasian Studies (JCACS) is a refereed journal and published twice (Winter and Summer) a year. JCACS publishes scholarly articles in Turkish and English from all over the world. The Editorial Office of the JCACS is in the International Strategic Research Organisation (ISRO) central building in Ankara, Turkey. However the journal is an independent publication in terms of scientific research and the editors decide its publication policy.

JCACS focuses on legal, political, sociological, cultural, social, religious, anthropological and economic studies regarding the Central Asia, Caucasus and neighbouring states' (Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, India, Afghanistan, China, Mongolia, Russia) and regions' (Black Sea, South Asia, Middle East, Far East) relations with the Central Asia and the Caucasus.

The journal encourages interdisciplinary studies. Manuscripts submitted to JCACS should be original and challenging, and should not be under consideration by another publication at the time of submission.

We also welcome short pieces on recent developments and review articles.

Articles submitted for consideration of publication are subject to peer review. The editorial board and editors take consideration whether submitted manuscript follows the rules of scientific writing. The appropriate articles are then sent to two referees known for their academic reputation in their respective areas.

The Editors and referees use three-step guidelines in assessing submissions:

i) Literary quality: Writing style, usage of the language, organisation (paragraphing, syntax, flow etc.)

ii) Use of references. Referencing, sources, relationships of the footnotes to the text.

iii) Scholarship quality: Depth of research, quality; contribution, originality of the contribution (new and creative thought) and plausibility of the author's argument.

Upon the referees' decision, the articles will be published in the journal, or rejected for publication. The review process lasts from five to 15 weeks. Questions regarding the status of submissions should be directed to the Editor by e-mail at or The referee reports are kept confidential and stored in the archives for five years.


JCACS's aim is to generate a productive dialogue and exchange between theorists, writers and practitioners in disparate locations. JCACS assumes that one of the main problems in Central Asian and Caucasian studies is lack of dialogue between writers and scholars from different cultural backgrounds.

All manuscripts and editorial correspondence and enquiries should be addressed to the JCACS Editorial Office (The Office).


We prefer electronic submission to or as a Microsoft word attachment file. Please be sure that you received a confirmation from The Office. Manuscripts should be one-and-half or double spaced throughout (including all quotations and footnotes) and typed in English on single sides of A4 paper. Generous margins on both sides of the page should be allowed. Pages should be numbered consecutively. The author should retain a copy, as submitted manuscripts cannot be returned. Full names of the author(s) should be given, an address for correspondence, and where possible a contact telephone number, facsimile number and e-mail address.


Articles as a rule should not exceed 10.000 words, not including footnotes. Book reviews should be about 2.500 word-length for one book, or maximum 3.500 words for two or more books.

Style and Proofs

Authors are responsible for ensuring that their manuscripts conform to the JCACS style. Editors will not undertake retyping of manuscripts before publication. Please note that authors are expected to correct and return proofs of accepted articles within two weeks of receipt.

Titles and Sub-Titles: Titles in the article should be 12 punt, bold and in uppercase form. The sub-titles should be 12 punt and in the title case form.

Footnotes: In the case of books the following order should be observed in footnotes: Author(s), Title, (Place of Publishing: Publisher, Year), Page. For example:

1. Begali Qosimov, Istiqlol Qahramonlari: Mahmud Khoja Behbudiy, Tanlangan Asarlar, (Tashkent: Ma'naviyot, 1997), p. 45.

In articles: Author(s), "Article Title", Journal Title, Vol., No., Year, Page.

2. Chantal Lemercier-Quelquejay, "Abdul Kayum Al-Nasuri: A Tatar Reformer of the 19th Century", Central Asian Survey, Vol. 1, No. 4, April 1983, pp. 122-124.

Book Reviews: Book reviews should be preceded by full publication details including price and ISBN number:

Dale F. Eickelman, The Middle East and Central Asia: An Anthropological Perspective, 4. Edition, (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2001). 384 sayfa. Biblo. Index. $48.40. ISBN: 0130336785


Current and recent academic and professional affiliations, and recent major publications for the Notes on Contributors should be supplied with the articles. It should not exceed 150 words.


The authors should send a 200-word abstract of the manuscripts. For more information about the journal feel free to contact with the editors.

Editors: Turgut DEMIRTEPE & Esra HATIPOGLU
Assisting Editor: Hasan Selim ÖZERTEM
Editorial Office: JCACS/ OAKA, Ayten Sokak, No: 21, Mebusevleri, Tandogan, Ankara, TURKEY

back to page index

Asian Women

[from H-NET, 7/21/10]

Asian Women seeks submissions for recent gender issues such as women and welfare, women's rights, eco-feminism, health, women and bio-technology, women and history, men's studies and other relevant themes in gender studies. Asian Women is accepting submissions for general theme.

Asian Women, an interdisciplinary journal covering various Women's Studies, Men's Studies and Gender Studies themes, hopes to share intelligent original papers as well as case studies with you. Any contributions of theoretical papers, regional reports, or case studies based on feminist studies and Asian studies will be welcomed. The editors welcome submissions that are based on either collaborative or independent scholarship. They also receive submissions from a wide variety of Asia and other countries. Contributors need to send their manuscripts to the Research Institute of Asian Women any time. For more information, contact:

Managing Editor
Research Institute of Asian Women
Sookmyung Women's University
52 Hyochangwon-gil, Youngsan-ku
Seoul, Korea 140-742.

back to page index

World Art

[from World Art, 9/5/10]

Two issues of World Art are published each year. All contributions are peer reviewed, under consultation with the journal's Advisory Board. Some volumes are guest edited and, where appropriate, contributions will be grouped by theme. Issues alternate between those which are general in content and those which engage specific themes.

The editors seek original material with intellectual integrity. Text as well as image-based contributions are welcome. Picture or photo essays, with critical commentary will also be considered.

[For categories of content, a style guide and submission guidelines, please consult]

back to page index


[courtesy of Antiqua, 1/14/11]

Antiqua (eISSN 2038-9604) is a new, peer-reviewed, Open Access journal intended to archaeologists and scientists having particular interests in the application of scientific techniques and methodologies to all areas of archaeology. Our journal publishes Original Research papers as as well as Rapid Communications, Case Histories, Editorials, and Letters. The journal seeks to provide an international, rapid forum for archaeologists to share their own knowledge.

Open Access journals are an ideal platform for the publication of your research enabling you to reach the widest available audience of professionals in your field of expertise. Publication in our journals means that your research articles will be available for free access online being immediately citable. PAGEPress shortens the time needed before publication, offers a high quality peer-review system, highly-professional scientific copyediting, DOI assignment, and submission to many online directories such as the Directory of Open Access Journals, arXiv, GEOBASE, Inspec, Chemical Abstracts Service, IndexCopernicus, Google Scholar, Scopus, EBSCOHost, Socolar, OpenJGate and others.

PAGEPress strongly support the mission of the Council of Science Editors (CSE): "CSE's purpose is to serve members in the scientific, scientific publishing, and information science communities by fostering networking, education, discussion, and exchange and to be an authoritative resource on current and emerging issues in the communication of scientific information." All individuals collaborating with PAGEPress are strongly invited to comply with this mission.

Open access publishing does have its costs. Since PAGEPress does not have subscription charges for its research content it can defray publishing costs from the Article Processing Charges (APC). This is because PAGEPress believes that the interests of the scientific community can best be served by an immediate, worldwide, unlimited, open access to the full text of research articles. The price for publication of any type of articles in our journal is EUR 350,00.

back to page index

Review of Culture

[from H-NET, 5/7/11]

For the past 20 years, Review of Culture (RC) has served the needs of Chinese, Portuguese and English readers by issuing both Chinese and International (Portuguese and English) editions. A major academic quarterly dealing with Macao history and culture, RC aims to foster the exchange of ideas relating to Chinese and Western cultures, to reflect the unique identity of Macao and to stimulate ideas and discussions of topics related to Macao culture and history, establishing an intellectual forum for "Macao Studies." RC - International edition is putting out this call for articles.

Please contact us with projects and articles that fall within our editorial guidelines. In a nutshell: Macao Studies, (Related) Sinology, Asia/China-Europe/West Encounter in the field of Humanities. More on the RC editorial guidelines in our on-line edition.

At the moment, a line of research we are pursuing is Anglo-American presence in Macao and the South China Seas and Sino-American historic relations.

Other projects under development:
- 100 years of Portuguese and Chinese republics (1910/1911)
- Western coats of arms in Chinese porcelains and pottery
- 500 years of Portugal-Siam relations and the role of Macau (RC is associated with the official commemorations that are taking place in Lisbon and Bangkok)
- Malacca 500 years (1511-2011)
- Macau in the origins of the Chinese migration to (Portuguese) Africa
- Macanese diaspora(s)

We accept (preferably) original articles but we also consider papers that were only presented in public lectures/conferences and not yet published.

Royalties vary between 500 and 1,000 American dollars, depending on originality and length. Academic papers will have usually 7,000-10,000 words. Short essays and book reviews are also welcome.

After approval of a paper we usually ask for a set of materials, as follows:
- Digital article with automatic footnotes
- Bibliography (References)
- Abstract (150-250 words)
- Keywords
- Bionote of the Author (up to 80 words)
- Illustrations or suggestions of illustrations with a clear indication of the source.

Since it was founded, in 1987, hundreds of researchers worldwide had contributed to RC. I sincerely hope you or a fellow researcher of your group of contacts can become another valuable contributor.

Kind regards,
Paulo Coutinho
Executive editor
Revista de Cultura/Review of Culture
International edition
Cultural Affairs Bureau of Macau SAR

back to page index

Bulletin of the Society for East Asian Archaeology

[from SEAA, 1/31/11]

The Bulletin of the Society for East Asian Archaeology (BSEAA) (ISSN 1864-6018, print version: ISSN 1864-6026, ed. Barbara Seyock, Tuebingen) was initiated in March 2007, and two volumes have been published since. BSEAA welcomes essays on East Asian archaeology, and it moreover provides a means of publishing smaller manuscripts such as field reports, project outlines, conference reports and papers, book reviews, museum roundups etc. The contributions appear online at varying intervals over the year. BSEAA is not peer-reviewed. The editor(s), however, reserves the right to seek for additional opinion, to edit the manuscripts, or to decline the publication of manuscripts inappropriate to the aims and objectives of SEAA.

BSEAA is an open access publication, with the exception of a 3-months preview period for SEAA members and authors. The average delay between submitting your manuscript and having it published is about 4 to 6 weeks. Colour photos and illustrations are welcome. Non English-native speakers receive a helping hand.

Please refer to the Contribution Guidelines for further information.

All contributions should be sent by e-mail to the editor.

back to page index

International Journal of Tantric Studies

[from H-ASIA, 5/31/11]

We are seeking academics and bona fide scholars to write and submit finished papers and review papers to our scholarly online publication (established 1995), the International Journal of Tantric Studies. The IJTS is open to all bona fide scholars in Hindu and Buddhist Tantric and Tantra-related studies, translations and translators in Sanskrit, Bengali, Vernacular, Tibetan, Chinese, Japanese, etc. We are looking for articles that engage any aspect of this broad theme.

Before submitting your paper / paper review, please read our Submission Guidelines. Send proposals to Enrica Garzilli.

We plan to publish all the IJTS papers in hard copy shortly depending on the next issue, hopefully by the end of the year.

IJTS editors:
Enrica Garzilli (Editor-in-Chief), Michael Witzel (Managing Editor), Roberto Donatoni, Minoru Hara, David N. Lorenzen, Benjamin Prejado, Michael Rabe, Debabrata Sensharma, Karel van Kooij.

back to page index


[from CAA, 6/29/11]

Exposure, the journal of the Society for Photographic Education (SPE), invites submissions for scholarly articles, interviews, conversations, art and cultural criticism, pedagogical essays, book and exhibition reviews, and any manuscripts that engage with the contemporary conversation on photography and related media. A leading voice in the conversation on photography and related media for over thirty years, Exposure publishes an inclusive range of images and ideas by those passionate about photographic discourse.

For publication consideration, please submit an abstract of no more than one hundred words, a list of illustrations, and a biographical statement of no more than fifty words. Detailed submission guidelines and more information on the journal can be found on the Web site at Submissions are accepted year-round.

For more information, contact Stacey McCarroll Cutshaw, Editor of Exposure.

back to page index

Palgrave Studies in the History of the Media

[from H-ASIA, 8/3/11]

Palgrave Studies in the History of the Media was launched in 2010 with the objective of becoming a leading international series in media history. Its overriding objective is to publish high caliber research in the field which will help shape current interpretations not only of the media, in any of its forms, but also of the powerful relationship between the media and politics, society, and the economy.

A number of important monographs have already appeared: Dr Christoph Muller's West-Germans against the West (2010) and Professor Michael Krysto's American Radio in China (April 2011). More studies are due out soon, not least Professor Joel Weiner's Americanization of the British Press (October 2011).

The series editors would welcome monograph proposals on any aspect of the history of the media from the mediaeval and early modern periods up to the present day.

Informal enquiries are very welcome. Proposals can be completed on Palgrave's standard form and submitted to:

Dr Alexander Wilkinson
Director, Centre for the History of the Media
School of History and Archives
University College Dublin
Dublin 4

back to page index

Journal of Asian Studies

[from MCLC, 8/11/11]

The Journal of Asian Studies has begun using Editorial Manager, a web-based manuscript submission system.

We ask that all new manuscript submissions be submitted through Editorial Manager. Please note that if you currently have a manuscript under review, it will not show up in the database. Before submitting a manuscript for consideration, please read the "Requirements for Manuscript Submission" to ensure that your work conforms with the Journal's guidelines on style and formatting.

If you have previously submitted a manuscript, served as a reviewer, or helped us in some other way, we invite you to register with Editorial Manager and update your contact information. Please let us know about your areas of interest, and if you would like to review books and/or manuscripts. Once you are in the system, you can also submit manuscripts to JAS. You will not have to reenter your contact or specialty information after you have registered unless you need to update your information. If you ever forget your password, you can ask to have it sent to you.

If you have questions that you can not answer through Editorial Manager, please feel free to send an e-mail to

Best Wishes,
Jeff Wasserstrom, Editor
Jennifer Munger, Managing Editor
Journal of Asian Studies

back to page index

International Journal of Islamic Architecture

[from H-ASIA, 8/11/11]

The International Journal of Islamic Architecture (IJIA) publishes bi-annually, peer reviewed articles on the urban design and planning, architecture and landscape architecture of the historic Islamic world, encompassing the Middle East and parts of Africa and Asia, but also the more recent geographies of Islam in its global dimensions. The main emphasis is on the detailed analysis of the practical, historical and theoretical aspects of architecture, with a focus on both design and its reception. The journal also aims to encourage dialogue and discussion between practitioners and scholars. Articles that bridge the academic-practitioner divide are highly encouraged.

IJIA is now soliciting manuscripts in the following categories:

Design in Theory: DiT manuscripts focus on the history, theory and critical analyses of architecture, urban planning and design and landscape architecture. Essays submitted should be a minimum of 5,000 words but not more than 8,000 words.

Design in Practice: DiP manuscripts focus on the practice of architecture, planning and landscape design. It is preferential that DiP papers focus on contextual and/or conceptual issues, analysis or critique of proposals or built projects. Submissions may also include interviews or practitioner reflections or lessons learned. Manuscripts should range from 2,000 to 3,000 words.

Book, Media and Exhibition Reviews: For those are interested in writing book/media/exhibition reviews for IJIA , please submit your CV and your areas of expertise and interest and the books/media/exhibition you wish to review to Nancy Um, the Reviews Editor, for consideration. Unsolicited reviews will not be accepted. The length of the reviews should generally not exceed 1000 words for one book review essay and no more than 1800 words for an essay that reviews multiple books.

For information and for guidelines on submission please visit the IJIA website. E-mail the editors at for any additional questions or information.

back to page index

Guoji Song Yanjiu [International Song Studies]

[from H-ASIA, 8/22/11]

Hangzhou Normal University has established a new Academy of Chinese Studies (Guoxue Yuan); and among its five Centers is an International Center for Research on the Song (Guoji Song Yanjiu Zhongxin). The Song Center and its new journal (Guoji Song Yanjiu) take a broad view of the Song, so it is not limited to history, but encompasses other disciplines, such as the fine arts, literature, archeology, etc. Studies of the Western Xia, the Liao, Jin and Yuan are welcome, especially as they relate to the Song. Moreover, the Center and its journal invite research on Song studies in later dynasties in East Asia and also during the Modern era worldwide. In the future, the Center will announce programs to assist the research of graduate students and professors; however, the focus at present is the journal.

Hoyt Tillman (Tian Hao) is serving as chief editor of the journal in close collaboration with Professor Deng Xiaonan of Peking University and other members of the editorial board. The journal will publish research articles and book reviews in either Chinese or English. In addition, the journal will publish Chinese translations of selected important articles in other languages.

English and Chinese articles should be submitted via e-mail attachment and supplemented by a mailed hardcopy. Please send inquiries and article manuscripts to and/or to

Mailing addresses for hard copies are:

Hoyt Tillman
School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies
P. O. Box 874302
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ 85287-4302

Deng Xiaonan
Department of History
Peking University
Beijing 100871

Format and style issues follow the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies for English language articles and Lishi Yanjiu for Chinese language articles.

The journal also welcomes longer articles than are usually published in China. The journal will be published annually beginning in May 2012.

back to page index

Routledge Critical Studies in Buddhism series

[from H-ASIA, 8/24/11]

Routledge Critical Studies in Buddhism is a comprehensive study of the Buddhist tradition. The series explores this complex and extensive tradition from a variety of perspectives, using a range of different methodologies. The series is diverse in its focus, including historical, philological, cultural, and sociological investigations into the manifold features and expressions of Buddhism worldwide. It also presents works of constructive and reflective analysis, including the role of Buddhist thought and scholarship in a contemporary, critical context and in the light of current social issues.

The series is expansive and imaginative in scope, spanning more than two and a half millennia of Buddhist history. It is receptive to all original, scholarly works that are of significance and interest to the broader field of Buddhist Studies. Books published in the series are first issued in a high-quality durable hardcover format geared toward institutional sales, and then they are subsequently published in an affordable paper format through the Routledge Paperbacks Direct program. Books in the series benefit from Routledges strong international presence, which markets and distributes books worldwide.

Please send your proposals to:
Dorothea Schaefter, Editor for Asian Studies at Routledge
Stephen C. Berkwitz, Department of Religious Studies, Missouri State University.

back to page index

Art Bulletin

[from CAA, 9/1/11]

The Art Bulletin welcomes submissions from scholars worldwide and at every stage in their career. To facilitate the process, CAA has prepared guidelines for authors who wish to submit a manuscript for consideration and for those preparing an accepted manuscript for publication.


Please submit manuscripts and letters to the editor to:

Karen Lang
Department of History of Art
Milburn House
University of Warwick
Coventry CV4 7HS
United Kingdom.

The Art Bulletin no longer accepts hard-copy submissions. All submissions must be sent electronically, either via e-mail or a large-file transfer service such as All files must be in Microsoft Word or a Microsoft Word–compatible format. Please review the submission guidelines for more information.

Reviews Editor

The Art Bulletin does not accept unsolicited book and exhibition reviews. Inquiries, letters regarding reviews, and commissioned reviews should be sent to:

Michael Cole
Publications Department
College Art Association
50 Broadway
21st Floor
New York, NY 10004.

Books for review should be mailed to:

Publications Department
College Art Association
50 Broadway
21st Floor
New York, NY 10004.

back to page index

Art Review

[from MCLC, 10/30/11]

Art Review is an illustrated bilingual international academic journal which publishes essays and reviews on all types of art, artists and art theories. Contributions in either English or Chinese are eagerly solicited. The journal is sponsored by Sichuan University, one of the most prestigious universities in China.

Art Review provides a broad field for various approaches and arguments. It covers not only essays on art history, art criticism and aesthetic theory, but also interdisciplinary art studies such as philosophical, psychological, anthropological, semiotic, sociological, politico-economic, or any other approaches so long as it aims at a enlightening interpretation of art.

Art Review advocates the idea of "BIG ART," with no constrains on the genres and subject of the art to be studied. The genres covered not only could be traditional art (painting, sculpture, architecture, calligraphy, music, dance, drama, folk art, ethnic art, cinema, etc), but also any form of art so long as you sufficiently argue that it is art. For instance, Art Review expects studies on "industrial" art such as advertisement, packaging, fashion, toys and gifts design, etc. Art Reviewparticularly welcomes studies on environment art, such as landscape, gardening, decoration, and digital art design such as video game and animation.

Contributions should follow the APA style.

Editor: Shunqin Cao
Executive Editor: Yirong Hu
Contacts of Art Review: <> (international) + <> (domestic)

back to page index

Modern East Asia in Global Historical Perspective

[from H-ASIA, 11/3/11]

Brill Series on Modern East Asia in Global Historical Perspective
Series Editors: Billy K.L. So and Madeleine Zelin

Editorial Board:
Prasenjit Duara (National University of Singapore)
Wang Fan-sen (Academia Sinica)
Rana Mitter (Oxford University) Joshua Fogel (York University, Toronto)
John Makeham (Australian National University)
Charles Armstrong (Columbia University)
Tomobe Kenichi (Osaka University)

The economic emergence of East Asia--first Japan, followed by the Little Dragons and Southeast Asia, and the recent rise of China, has produced a paradigm shift in the study of the East Asian regions. Not only has an earlier understanding based on adaptation to Western models given way to a re-evaluation of the interface between the local and the global, but scholarship itself has become increasingly transnational. This is evidenced in hitherto unseen levels of transnational collaboration, conferences and research programs, and the creation of on-line archives and virtual intellectual communities. East Asia, broadly defined to include both northeast and Southeast Asia, has contributed greatly to this shift. This series aims at providing a platform for the products of this scholarship, encouraging interdisciplinary, transnational and comparative research on the countries and peoples of the East Asian region, and their regional and global interactions. In an effort to reflect the full range of collaborations that are now taking place across the globe this series will feature monographs and edited volumes as well as translated works that explore the global processes of change in East Asia and the historical role of East Asia in the creation of the institutions, ideas, and practices that constitute our contemporary world.

Brill welcomes submissions of book proposals and manuscripts for consideration for inclusion in the series. Submissions should be in English and can be sent to the attention of the Series Editors, Billy So, Madeleine Zelin, or the Publishing Editor, Qin Higley.

back to page index


[from AAH, 1/23/12]

Submissions are invited from authors (artists and scholars) who can make a provocative contribution to this book series. We are particularly looking for further titles in the area of socio-political aesthetics or global aesthetics.

The RadicalAesthetics-RadicalArt (RaRa) series of books expands the parameters of art and aesthetics in a creative and meaningful way beyond visual traditions. Encompassing the multisensory, collaborative, participatory and transitory practices that have developed over the last twenty years, Radical Aesthetics-Radical Art is an innovative and revolutionary take on the intersection between theory and practice. The series aims to:

Titles already commissioned include:

Practical Aesthetics: Events, Affects and Art after 9/11- Jill Bennett (July 2012)
Eco-Aesthetics - Malcolm Miles
Indigenous Aesthetics: Art, Activism and Autonomy – Dylan Miner
Durational Aesthetics: Contemporary Art and the Prolongation of Time – Paul O'Neill and Mick Wilson

Proposals should be 3 to 5 sides A4 and include:

Author details should include:

Proposals should be e-mailed to both series editors by the end of March and for further information regarding submission please contact and

back to page index

Theoretical Studies in Literature and Art

[courtesy of M. Schimmelpfennig, 2/9/12]

Theoretical Studies in Literature and Art (TSLA), which was initiated in 1980 and published bimonthly, is one of the most highly ranked academic journals in China that publish original research articles in arts and humanities, especially in literary theory. From 2012 year onwards, TSLA will publish original academic articles that are written in English. Articles that deal with any issues in literary theory, critical theory, aesthetics, philosophy of art, cultural studies will be welcome. Discussions of Asian issues, particularly issues concerning China are encouraged but not required.

The length of papers should be about 6000-12000 words and in MLA format. The papers will be peer-reviewed, and the final decision about publication will be notified in four months. Authors can send e-mails to inquire the status if they receive no feedback in two months.

Queries and contributions can be sent to Contributions must be sent as attachments in either rtf(s) or Word 97-2003 file(s) with "contribution from xxx (i.e. your name)" as the subject heading.

back to page index

Asian Ethnology

[from H-ASIA, 1/26/12]

Dear Colleagues:

I have recently agreed to assume the co-editorship of the journal Asian Ethnology. Asian Ethnology is a semi-annual, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the promotion of ethnographic and ethnological research on the peoples and cultures of Asia. Though rendered entirely in English, the journal draws manuscript submissions from across Asia and Europe as well as North America. Topically, it occupies a special niche located at the intersection of Anthropology, Folklore, and Asian Studies. The journal has been particularly instrumental in bringing the important work of Asian scholars (that is, scholars of Asian nationality) to the attention of an English readership, thereby helping to mitigate Western domination of the global academic arena.

Formerly called Asian Folklore Studies, the journal was founded by Austrian ethnologist Matthias Eder in Beijing, China in 1942. Under threat from the Maoist takeover in 1949, Eder relocated to Nanzan University in Nagoya, Japan, from where the journal has been based ever since. We are especially interested in submissions on the following topics:

narratives, performances, and other forms of cultural representations
popular religious concepts
vernacular approaches to health and healing
local knowledge
collective memory and uses of the past
material culture
cultural transformations in diasporas
transnational flows
ecological issues

Generally, each issue of the journal contains at least one or two articles on the South Asian region, so we encourage you to submit your work to us. We also encourage thematic issues (e.g., an issue on Chinese folklore guest edited by Thomas DuBois is forthcoming). More information on the journal can be found on the home page.

back to page index

"Studies in Art Historiography" series

[from H-Arthist, 4/16/12]

"Studies in Art Historiography," published by Ashgate, welcomes contributions from architectural historians. Much recent historiography has focused on scholars of "Art History" but many of these made considerable contributions to architectural history, from Heinrich Wölfflin whose Renaissance und Barock is essentially architectural history, to Rudolf Wittkower whose impact is usually assessed in relation to the architectural profession and Modernist architecture. Cornelius Gurlitt, Geoffrey Scott, Hans Sedlmayr, Nikolaus Pevsner, Colin Rowe, Venturi and Scott Brown are just some of the names that come to mind and Studies in Art Historiography welcomes proposals for volumes dedicated to relevant themes in architectural historiography as well as individual studies of significant figures in the field.

More information about our book series and submission guidelines are available at

back to page index

Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide

[from H-Arthist, 3/3/12]

Digital Humanities Research and Publication in NCAW

Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide has received a grant from the Mellon Foundation for a three-year capacity-building initiative to maximize the possibilities of the journal electronic delivery. With this in mind, NCAW is soliciting potential articles that take full advantage of new web technologies either in the research or the publication phase, or both. The Mellon grant is intended to help authors in the development phase of their articles as well as to aid NCAW in the implementation phase. NCAW is seeking scholarship that engages in one or more of the following, interrelated areas of investigation:

Data Mining and Analysis:
Use of data analytics programs (e.g., SEASR, Network Workbench) to investigate connections among particular groups or individuals, such as artists, writers, art dealers, art markets and other networks of exchange (social networks). See for example "Mapping the Republic of Letters," produced by researchers and technologists at Stanford University.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Mapping:
Use of maps in concert with data sets (e.g., depictions of sites, location of objects, paths of travel) in order to investigate and communicate change over time and space. The website for the project "Imago Urbis: Giuseppe Vasi's Grand Tour of Rome," for example, links Giambattista Nolli's 1748 map of Rome with vedute created by Vasi, providing insight into the vedutismo tradition as well as the urban development of Rome in the eighteenth century.

High-Resolution imaging and dynamic image presentation:
Use of panoramic and/or high-resolution imagery to view, for example, panoramas, conservation images (x-ray, infrared reflectography), moving images. The QTVR panoramas of world architecture produced by Columbia University, are an example of the kind of image viewing interface that could be used in support of scholarship on, for example, panorama paintings or large-scale architectural installations.

Authors are not expected to have extensive technical expertise themselves; instead NCAW will work with them to help in realizing the computing aspects of their project. Authors should, however, be generally knowledgeable about the technological possibilities related to their project and should be able to articulate how both specific computer-based research methods and the online publication format connect with the research questions on which their project focuses. In addition, authors should expect to collaborate with technical experts on the realization of their projects. To this end, proposals which give some indication of how authors envision working with such experts, or which identify specific collaborative partners will be preferred. Finally, proposals should outline projects which are relatively small-scale, able to be realized within a time span of about three to six months and requiring around 100 hours of development work.

Interested contributors are asked to submit a 500-word abstract that describes the author's (or authors') project and explains how it fits within the areas described above and why advanced computing technologies are necessary for conducting this research and/or for presenting the resulting scholarship. In addition, they are asked to provide a short CV and a budget. For further information or to submit an application for funding, e-mail to Petra Chu and Emily Pugh.

back to page index

Journal of Art Historiography

[courtesy of R. Woodfield, 3/6/12]

The Journal of Art Historiography is an Open Access journal that exists to support and promote the study of the history and practice of art historical writing. The historiography of art has been strongly influenced by traditions inaugurated by Giorgio Vasari, Winckelmann and German academics of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Consequent to the expansion of universities, museums and galleries, the field has evolved to include areas outside of its traditional boundaries.

There is a double danger that contemporary scholarship will forget its earlier legacy and that it will neglect the urgency and rigour with which those early debates were conducted. The earlier legacy remains embedded in ‘normal' practice. More recent art history also stands in need of its own scrutiny. The journal is committed to studying art historical scholarship, in its institutional and conceptual foundations, from the past to the present day in all areas and all periods.

This journal will ignore the disciplinary boundaries imposed by the Anglophone expression "art history" and allow and encourage the full range of enquiry that encompassed the visual arts in its broadest sense as well as topics now falling within archaeology, anthropology, ethnography and other specialist disciplines and approaches. It will welcome contributions from young and established scholars and is aimed at building an expanded audience for what has hitherto been a much specialised topic of investigation.

Besides articles, it will accept notes, reviews, letters, bibliographical surveys and translations. It will be published every June and December and include both peer-reviewed and commissioned contributions.

It will be the first contemporary journal dedicated specifically to the study of art historiography and its ambition is to make it the point of first call for scholars and students interested in that area. It is being supported by the Department of the History of Art at the University of Birmingham. In collaboration with Ashgate it also publishes Monographs in Art Historiography.

Editor: R. Woodfield

back to page index

Journal of Chinese Military History

[from H-ASIA, 3/11/12]

The Journal of Chinese Military History, edited by David A. Graff and David Curtis Wright, is a peer-reviewed semi-annual from Brill that will begin publication in 2012. It publishes both research articles and book reviews, aiming to fill the need for a journal devoted specifically to China's martial past. It takes the broadest possible view of military history, embracing both the study of battles and campaigns and the broader, social-history oriented approaches that have come to be known as "the new military history," and it covers all of the Chinese past, from prehistory through the pre-imperial and imperial periods down to the present day, aiming to publish a balanced mix of articles that represent a variety of different approaches and address both the modern and pre-modern periods of Chinese history. The Journal of Chinese Military History also welcomes comparative and theoretical work, as well as studies of the military interactions between China and other states and peoples, including East Asian neighbors such as Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.

Manuscripts for articles should be between 7,500 and 20,000 words, double-spaced, and submitted electronically as MS Word documents.

Article submissions may be sent to either of the editors:
David A. Graff (Kansas State University)
David Curtis Wright (University of Calgary)

If you are interested in reviewing books for the journal, please contact the Book Review Editor, Kenneth M. Swope (Ball State University).

Editorial Board:
Yingcong Dai (William Paterson University)
Nicola Di Cosmo (Institute for Advanced Study)
Xiaobing Li (University of Central Oklahoma)
Peter Lorge (Vanderbilt University)
Arthur Waldron (University of Pennsylvania)
Peter Worthing (Texas Christian University)
Robin D.S. Yates (McGill University)
Xiaoming Zhang (U.S. Air War College)

back to page index

Journal of the British Association for Chinese Studies

[from H-ASIA, 4/18/12]

We are pleased to announce the launch of the Journal of the British Association for Chinese Studies (JBACS, ISSN 2048-0601), the new official journal of the British Association for Chinese Studies (BACS).

This is a peer-reviewed e-journal publishing original and innovative research in the multidisciplinary field of Chinese Studies, with articles in a wide range of subject areas--history, economics, politics, society, archaeology, language, literature, philosophy, culture, gender, international relations and law--relating to modern and pre-modern China.

We welcome submissions from all scholars with a focus on China, including items that cross disciplinary boundaries or do not otherwise match the subject areas listed above. All research articles in this journal undergo rigorous peer review, based on initial editor screening and anonymous double-blind refereeing by two referees. If you would like to submit an article or a book review, please check the submission guidelines available on our website. All queries and material should be submitted by e-mail [to]

Don Starr (Durham University)

Commissioning Editor:
Sarah Dauncey (University of Sheffield)

Editorial Board:
Tim Barrett (School of Oriental and African Studies)
Robert Bickers (University of Bristol)
Harriet Evans (University of Westminster)
Stephan Feuchtwang (London School of Economics)
Natascha Gentz (University of Edinburgh)
Michel Hockx (School of Oriental and African Studies)
Rana Mitter (University of Oxford)
Roel Sterckx (University of Cambridge)
Tim Wright (University of Sheffield, Emeritus)
Shujie Yao (University of Nottingham)

back to page index

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review

[from H-ASIA, 5/22/12]

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (e-ISSN: 2158-9674) is a peer-reviewed quarterly online journal that uses new technologies to facilitate a dialogue among East Asia scholars around the world that is enhanced by audio-visual and multilingual features. The e-journal is embedded in a web-based platform with functions for collaboration, discussion, and an innovative editing and publishing process. The semi-annual print issues of Cross-Currents (ISSN: 2158-9666) published by University of Hawai'i Press feature articles and review essays that have been selected from the journal's online counterpart for their scholarly excellence and relevance to the journal's mission.

Cross-Currents offers its readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives concerning East Asian history and culture from scholars in both English-speaking and Asian language-speaking academic communities. A joint enterprise of the Research Institute of Korean Studies at Korea University (RIKS) and the Institute of East Asian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley (IEAS), Cross-Currents seeks to balance issues traditionally addressed by Western humanities and social science journals with issues of immediate concern to scholars in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. This English-language journal includes scholarship on material from the sixteenth century to the present day that has significant implications for current models of understanding East Asian history and culture. An editorial board consisting of established scholars in Asia and North America provides oversight of the journal, in collaboration with two faculty co-editors (one each at Korea University and UC Berkeley).

The editors invite online submissions of original, unpublished research articles. The submission process and complete information about manuscript preparation can be found at Cross-Currents also features photo essays, review essays, annotated bibliographies, and summaries of important recent publications in C/J/K/V. We welcome proposals for these categories as well.

Requests for further information may be directed to the managing editor.

Keila Diehl, Ph.D.
Managing Editor
Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review
Institute of East Asian Studies
University of California, Berkeley
2223 Fulton Street, 6th Floor
Berkeley, CA 94720-2318
tel (510) 643-5104
fax (510) 643-7062
e-mail <>.

back to page index

Journal of Asia Pacific Studies

[from H-NET, 3/13/13]

Journal of Asia Pacific Studies (JAPS) is calling for papers for the May issue. JAPS is a peer-reviewed academic journal published in Florida, USA. The journal is published both in print and online. JAPS is indexed by EBSCOhost and other prestigous databases.

Editor in Chief
Journal of Asia Pacific Studies
e-mail <>>

back to page index

Archives of Asian Art

[courtesy of S. Abe, 6/5/12]

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

I would like to update you on some new developments in Archives of Asian Art:

Stan Abe
Editor and Chair of the Editorial Board

back to page index

Dissertation Reviews

[from H-ASIA, 6/12/12 and 7/11/12]

Dissertation Reviews is a website that features friendly, non-critical overviews of recently defended and unpublished dissertations. Dissertation Reviews currently covers 15 fields, including Chinese History, Japan Studies, Korean Studies, South Asian Studies, Southeast Asian Studies, Inner Asian Studies, Tibetan and Himalayan Studies and many more.

The goal of the site is to offer all scholars a glimpse of the "immediate present" of the field. Rather than reviewing monographs, the publication of which may take a number of years after the completion of a project, the site is dedicated to examining what is happening right now in the field.

The Asia-related branches of Dissertation Reviews are currently seeking new dissertations to be featured in the 2012-2013 season. If you would like to have your dissertation reviewed (2011 defense onwards), or would like to contribute a review, please contact us at: For more details, please visit the sites below:

Frequently Asked Questions
Overview of the Site
"Dissertation Reviews: An Introduction" by Thomas Mullaney

If you work in any of the fields listed below, and have recently spent time/will spend time conducting research in archives, libraries, special collections, museums, private collections, etc., please contact us at

- Asian Art History
- Chinese History
- Inner Asian Studies
- Islamic Studies
- Japan Studies
- Korean Studies
- South Asian Studies
- Southeast Asian Studies
- Tibetan and Himalayan Studies

Editor-in-Chief: Thomas Mullaney (Stanford University)
Managing Editor: Leon Rocha (University of Cambridge)

back to page index

Intellectual History

[from H-ASIA, 7/11/12]

Intellectual history has long held a central place in the scholarly traditions of France, Germany, and Britain, as well as China. The new journal Intellectual History aims to promote this disciplinary field in the world of Chinese-language scholarship, especially that of Taiwan, though we will also publish English-language articles. We hope to stimulate thinking about intellectual history in the broadest terms and to encourage a community of scholars to forge closer ties.

The new journal is interested in the processes by which individual texts and particular systems of thought have been made, developed and appropriated in different civilizations at different periods of history. In this context the word 'text' will be taken to cover philosophical, scientific and literary texts, art objects, music, experimental instruments, and etc. Intellectual History will be open to all contributions that touch upon the development of thought in China and in the rest of the world, and that consider theoretical and methodological issues. We welcome contributions that report findings of historical investigations and of textual analyses; moreover, we especially welcome innovative and suggestive approaches to new research topics of historical interest.

Intellectual History's inaugural issue will be published by Lianjing Publishing Company in the spring of 2013. The journal will publish semi-annually in Chinese and English. Chinese style sheet: please see Xinshixue; English: please see Modern Intellectual History. Paper submissions and queries to:

Editors: Chen Jeng-guo (Academia Sinica), Lu Miawfen (Academia Sinica), Carl K. Y. Shaw (Academia Sinica), Peter Zarrow (Academia Sinica)

Advisory board: David Armitage (Harvard), Peter Bol (Harvard), Chang Hao (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology), Chen Ruo-shuei (Taiwan University), Benjamin Elman (Princeton), Ge Zhaoguang (Fudan), Knud Haakonssen (University of Sussex), Huang Chin-hsing (Academia Sinica), Jonathan Israel (Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton), Lin Yusheng (University of Wisconsin), Luo Zhitian (Sichuan University and Peking University), Murata Yujiro (University of Tokyo), Nicholas Phillipson (Edinburgh University), Wang Fan-sen (Academia Sinica), Yu Ying-shih (Princeton)

back to page index

Asian Archaeology

[from Asian Archaeology, 1/16/12]

Asian Archaeology is an annual journal that is sponsored by Research Center for Chinese Frontier Archaeology (RCCFA), Jilin University (the Key Institute of Humanities and Social Sciences granted by the Ministry of education, PRC). The first issue will be published in 2012.

Asian Archaeology is an academic English journal that publishes original papers on the new discoveries, achievements and viewpoints of Chinese archaeology, also concerning the new discoveries and research of other parts of Asian and Oceanian areas, mainly for overseas scholars. Asian Archaeology will draw up the four columns or theses as follows:

1) Chinese archaeology. It includes reports and research of new archaeological materials in Chinese archaeology.

2) Asian archaeology. It includes the new discoveries and research of other parts of Asian and Oceanian areas.

3) Archaeological sciences. It includes new archaeological methods, theories, and practice on various subdisciplines of, archaeological sciences, including Archaeometry, Zooarchaeology, Paleoethnobotany, Physical Anthropology, Environmental Archaeology, Molecular Archaeology, Biochemical Archaeology, and so on.

4) Newsletters. It includes the important new discoveries of China and other parts of Asia.

We accept English manuscripts that are best about 8,000 to 10,000 words in length (including figures and references). A manuscript should be prepared with an abstract (about 600 words), a list of five keywords and a brief introduction of authors. The Manuscripts are contributed by bidirectional Anonymous Paper Reviewing System. If the manuscript is printed, author will be presented five sample journals and copyright royalties.

E-mail for submission:

Correspondence should be addressed to:
Nan Feng
Research Center for Chinese Frontier Archaeology (RCCFA)
Jilin University
(No. 244, Kuangyaming Building, Qianwei Campus), No. 2699
Qianjin Avenue
Changchun City
Jilin Province
tel +(86) 431-85166321
fax +(86) 431-85166320.

back to page index

Journal of Jesuit Studies

[from H-NET, 11/29/12]

A new quarterly journal is to be launched by Brill: The Journal of Jesuit Studies. Each issue of the journal will contain an extensive review section that looks at all aspects of Jesuit history (from the sixteenth century to the present day, and in all corners of the globe), as well as books that explore the Jesuit role in the arts and sciences, theology, education, literature, and the many other avenues of Jesuitica. We will also include numerous reviews on the broader history of post-1500 Christianity and other related topics.

Publishers are invited to send copies for review consideration to the following address:

Dr Jonathan Wright
Reviews Editor
Journal of Jesuit Studies
Department of Theology and Religion
Durham University
Abbey House
Palace Green
Durham DH1 3RS
United Kingdom.

back to page index

Singaporean Journal of Buddhist Studies

[from H-NET, 11/27/12]

The Buddhist College of Singapore has just launched a new peer-reviewed Chinese & English journal of Buddhist Studies, the Singaporean Journal of Buddhist Studies. The first issue is to be published in a year or so, after that it will be published twice a year.

It accepts unpublished research papers on all aspects of Buddhist Studies. Interested scholars can send their work to

back to page index

Asia Pacific: Perspectives

[from H-ASIA, 12/20/12]

The University of San Francisco Center for the Pacific Rim is pleased to announce the call for papers for Asia Pacific: Perspectives. The editors welcome submissions from all fields of the social sciences and the humanities that focus on the Asia Pacific region, especially those adopting a comparative, interdisciplinary approach to issues of interrelatedness in the Asia Pacific region.

Asia Pacific: Perspectives (ISSN: 2167-1699) is a peer-reviewed electronic journal published twice a year by the University of San Francisco Center for the Pacific Rim. Our task is to inform public opinion through publications that express divergent views and ideas that promote cross-cultural understanding, tolerance, and the dissemination of knowledge. The journal offers a forum for the exchange of ideas from both established scholars in the field and graduate students.

To submit a paper, Send a single DOUBLE-SPACED copy with any and all inclusions to the editors. Electronic copies must be in MS Word or compatible format; tables, charts or images may be inserted in the text document or be included as separate files. Further guidelines are posted at Submissions should be addressed to:

Dayna Barnes, Managing Editor
Asia Pacific: Perspectives
The Center for the Pacific Rim
University of San Francisco
2130 Fulton Street
San Francisco, CA 94117-1080.

back to page index

Series of Jesuit Studies

[from H-NET, 12/16/12]

Brill has founded a monograph Series of Jesuit Studies.

Associated with the Journal of Jesuit Studies, SJS will target those areas of scholarship on Jesuit history in its broader context that have been lamentably neglected but it will also invite contributions of important but hard to find monographs in other languages, which we shall encourage to be translated.

Contact: Dr. Robert A. Maryks

back to page index

American Journal of Chinese Studies

[from H-ASIA, 1/6/13]

The American Journal of Chinese Studies is soliciting manuscripts in the humanities (including history, literature, religion, fine arts, philosophy, etc.) that focus on Chinese communities, including mainland China (past and present), Taiwan, Hong Kong and the Chinese Diaspora.

AJCS is a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal published by the American Association for Chinese Studies. Past issues have included humanistic work, but the emphasis was on social sciences. The editorial board is looking to increase the number of humanistic papers published in the journal.

For questions about submission and subscriptions contact the journal editor:

Professor Thomas Bellows
Department of Political Science
The University of Texas at San Antonio
San Antonio, TX 78249.

back to page index

Journal of Curatorial Studies

[from H-Arthist, 1/6/13]

The editors of the Journal of Curatorial Studies invite proposals for original research articles on the subject of curating, exhibitions and display culture. The journal also seeks reviews of recent exhibitions, books and conferences.

The Journal of Curatorial Studies is an international, peer-reviewed publication that explores the increasing relevance of curating and exhibitions and their impact on institutions, audiences, aesthetics and display culture. Inviting perspectives from visual studies, art history, critical theory, cultural studies and other academic fields, the journal welcomes a diversity of disciplinary approaches on curating and exhibitions broadly defined. By catalyzing debate and serving as a venue for the emerging discipline of curatorial studies, this journal encourages the development of the theory, practice and history of curating, as well as the analysis of exhibitions and display culture in general.

Potential topics include:
- critical case studies of curators and exhibitions
- curatorial methodologies and transdisciplinary strategies
- curatorial media (e.g., social, digital and virtual)
- the cultural politics of display
- exhibition typologies and histories
- curatorial ethics and aesthetics
- curating and globalization
- para-curating: artworld rituals, openings, tours, prizes
- curating collections, archives and commissions
- display practices in popular and mass culture

The Journal of Curatorial Studies publishes three times a year and considers submissions on a continuing basis. Please send a 250-word abstract and a CV to the editors. Essays run 5-6000 words. Please send submissions and correspondence to the Editors: Jim Drobnick (OCAD University) and Jennifer Fisher (York University).

The first issue of the Journal of Curatorial Studies is available free on-line:,id=205/. Visit the journal on Facebook to keep informed about new developments.

back to page index


[from MCLC, 3/16/13]

Eurosinica is a book series for monographs of various thematic focuses, sharing the goal of studying culture and literature in contemporary or historical contexts. The series, under the imprint of Peter Lang, was founded in 1984 by the German sinologist Günther Debon (1921–2005) and the Canadian comparatist Adrian Hsia (1938–2010); so far, thirteen books have been published. While the founding editors placed the emphasis on the transfer processes of classical literary works and motifs between cultures, the continuation of their work requires new approaches.

Rather than operate within the conceptual framework of "cultural dialogue" between an East and a West viewed as distinct entities, the series editors tend to a view of cultures in contact. Eurosinica is accordingly open for studies and interpretation of authors, personalities, genres and individual works committed to an understanding of humanity as a common source of values which, rather than be impeded by cultural, linguistic or ethnic disparity, are being reshaped and reinvented in different settings.

From the basic concept the series' founders have contributed, we will carry on the approach to literature, the arts and history as transnational narratives emerging out of distinct contextualization and relying on as well as contributing to both the European and the Sinic cultural spheres. We explicitly welcome well-argued innovative interpretations of classical works, as we do historical and translation studies. At a time of ongoing global changes of aesthetic and critical paradigms, Eurosinica does not intend to propose the East-West-paradigm as a last refuge for intellectual cultural conservatism, but rather envisages new critical approaches to the sporadic process of aesthetic and historical interactions ("contacts") between formerly allegedly "separated" cultural spheres.

Eurosinica expects to publish between one and two volumes annually and aims for a balance between studies of contemporary or ancient focus. It thereby seeks to counter the trend of separating research on classical and modern issues.

Eurosinica will consider manuscripts in European languages. The series editors and board members are scholars at universities in the Baltic and Nordic countries of Europe, as well as in mainland China, Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macao. They represent the disciplines of comparative literature, cultural studies and history in European and East Asian languages.

As a series, Eurosinica is directed and managed by AsiaRes, the Baltic Research Center for East Asian studies at the University of Latvia in Riga and the Department of Oriental Studies at Stockholm University). For further information, please write to or

Frank Kraushaar (Tallinn University; AsiaRes University of Latvia)
Irmy Schweiger (University of Stockholm/Sweden)

Board Members:
He Chengzhou (Nanjing)
Mark Gamsa (Tel Aviv/ Riga)
Sher-shiueh Li (Taibei)
Shu-ching Ho (Düsseldorf)
Lucie Berner (Macao)
Tatsuo Takahashi (Tokyo)
Rossella Ferrari (London)

back to page index

Asiascape: Digital Asia

[from H-NET, 4/3/13]

Launching in 2014, the bi-annual academic journal Asiascape: Digital Asia now invites submissions for research articles that explore the political, social, and cultural impact of digital media in Asia. Although we do not exclude scholarship in digital culture and culture studies, Asiascape: Digital Asia's focus is on research from the social sciences, arts, media and communication studies, information and computer sciences, and area studies.

Bringing together state-of-the-art research from these fields, 'Asiascape: Digital Asia' examines the role that information, communication, and other digital technologies play in Asian societies (Japan, the Koreas, China, Hong Kong, Macao, Taiwan, India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines), as well as in intra-regional dynamics and transnational links between the region and other parts of the world. The peer-reviewed journal addresses issues such as:

- media converge in the digital age
- transnational flows of digital culture,
- e-governance,
- the politics of network societies,
- online activism and digital challenges to state power,
- the workings of social and participatory media, and
- the dynamics of digital play.

The editors welcome contributions that analyse these issues through research that takes seriously the workings of ICT in different contexts, that critically theorizes such workings, and that is based on authoritative empirical analysis. We particularly encourage inter- and multi- disciplinary research that adopts digital methods, as well as theoretically-minded work that critically explores how ICTs can be understood through the lenses of different realities in Asia.

Asiascape: Digital Asia further welcomes reviews of book on the topics outlined above, with a specific focus on reviews that introduce non-Asian related works and scholars to the area-studies community, and research on Asia to the larger field of digital media and communication studies. In addition, the editors encourage reviews of relevant conferences, as well as of digital platforms and media products from Asia, such as social media websites, video sharing services, games, digital tools, etc.

Manuscript submissions should not exceed a length of 10,000 words, including notes and references. Review articles should not exceed 1,000 words. Asiascape: Digital Asia only accepts English-language articles.

All inquiries regarding article submissions can be addressed to:
Florian Schneider
Nozomi Goto

back to page index

Architectural Histories

[from H-Arthist, 3/8/13]

Architectural Histories, the new open access journal of the European Architectural History Network (EAHN), is now online and open to submissions.

Architectural Histories is an international, blind peer-reviewed scholarly journal that creates a space where historically grounded research into all aspects of architecture and the built environment can be made public, consulted, and discussed. The journal is open to historical, historiographic, theoretical, and critical contributions that engage with architecture and the built environment from a historical perspective.

We invite original contributions of the highest quality from scholars and critics in all stages of their career. The journal especially welcomes contributions that stimulate reflection and dialogue about the place of history and historical research within the varied and multifaceted ways in which architecture and the built environment are studied and debated today, across disciplines, cultures and regions.

We publish scholarly articles as well as position papers, shorter pieces addressing topical issues in our field of interest. For more information and guidelines, please visit To submit a paper, please register for the journal and submit online. Questions and queries may be addressed to the editor-in-chief, Maarten Delbeke.

back to page index

Third Text

[from AAH, 3/12/13]

Third Text is an international art and visual culture journal founded in 1987 and has to date published 121 issues. The journal occupies a forefront position at the research interface of contemporary art practice and critical theory.

Third Text invites submissions of original articles that will contribute radically new perspectives on the global artworld and its challenges to the ecology of contemporary art practices in the aftermath of postcolonial and institutional critiques. The journal welcomes varied explorations of visual art, cinema, video, photography, performance and activist art. Articles of 6000 words are preferred but lengthier ones will be considered on merit. Contributors should consult authors' guidelines on submissions.

Third Text has launched a bi-monthly online platform which also calls for original submissions of articles and reviews (1500 words) to be published under Creative Commons Agreement with authors.

Third Text is a peer-reviewed journal.

Submissions and questions should be addressed to Basia Sliwinska, Associate Editor, at

back to page index

ARCHITECTURE_MPS (Architecture, Media, Politics, Society)

[from H-NET, 4/11/13]

ARCHITECTURE_MPS (Architecture, Media, Politics, Society), ISSN 2050-9006

The journal's themes revolve around the relationship of architecture(s) in the politico-media-complex. Areas of interest include (but are not restricted to: architecture, landscape design, urbanism, critical studies, human geography, media studies, design. It is published monthly on-line and has a two yearly print version. It is indexed with all the main databases including Avery Index, EBSCO, ProQuest, Ulrichsweb etc.

In addition to full papers submitted for peer review, abstracts and works in progress will be accepted for initial consideration.

Dr. Graham Cairns
Ravensbourne (University College)
tel +44 (0)20 3040 3500
e-mail <>

back to page index

The Histories of Material Culture and Collecting, 1700-1950

[from H-Arthist, 5/3/13]

Book series from Ashgate Publishing
Series Editor: Michael Yonan (University of Missouri)

The Histories of Material Culture and Collecting, 1700-1950 provides a forum for the broad study of object acquisition and collecting practices in their global dimensions from the eighteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries. The series seeks to illuminate the intersections between material culture studies, art history, and the history of collecting. HMCC takes as its starting point the idea that objects both contributed to the formation of knowledge in the past and likewise contribute to our understanding of the past today. The human relationship to objects has proven a rich field of scholarly inquiry, with much recent scholarship either anthropological or sociological rather than art historical in perspective. Underpinning this series is the idea that the physical nature of objects contributes substantially to their social meanings, and therefore that the visual, tactile, and sensual dimensions of objects are critical to their interpretation. HMCC therefore seeks to bridge anthropology and art history, sociology and aesthetics. It encompasses the following areas of concern:

1. Material culture in its broadest dimension, including the high arts of painting and sculpture, the decorative arts (furniture, ceramics, metalwork, etc.), and everyday objects of all kinds.

2. Collecting practices, be they institutionalized activities associated with museums, governmental authorities, and religious entities, or collecting done by individuals and social groups.

3. The role of objects in defining self, community, and difference in an increasingly international and globalized world, with cross-cultural exchange and travel the central modes of object transfer.

4. Objects as constitutive of historical narratives, be they devised by historical figures seeking to understand their past or in the form of modern scholarly narratives.

The series publishes interdisciplinary and comparative research on objects that addresses one or more of these perspectives and includes monographs, thematic studies, and edited volumes of essays. A list of current and forthcoming titles in the series can be viewed at

Proposals should take the form of either:
1. a preliminary letter of inquiry, briefly describing the project; or
2. a formal prospectus including: abstract, brief statement of your critical methodology, table of contents, sample chapter, estimated word count, estimate of the number and type of illustrations to be included, and a c.v.

Please send a copy of either type of proposal to the series editor and commissioning editor:
Professor Michael Yonan
Margaret Michniewicz, Commissioning Editor

back to page index

Museum and Curatorial Studies Review

[from H-Arthist, 7/11/13]

Museum and Curatorial Studies Review is a new peer-reviewed journal powered by the University of California, Berkeley Electronic Press, and the California Digital Library. Each issue will feature full-length academic articles, exhibition reviews, book reviews and dialogic contributions (such as interviews and open letters).

Volume 1, Number 1 will be published very soon. The editors are now seeking contributions to journal's second issue.

All submissions should be sent electronically in MS Word format and follow The Chicago Manual of Style. The details for each submission type are below:

Article (6,000-9000 words): send a fully drafted, polished version of the paper to be blind peer reviewed.

Interview, open letter, or other conversational piece (2,000-6,000 words): send a 300-400 word proposal for the item [Note: interviewers are responsible for all transcription work]. Final drafts are also welcome.

Exhibition review (1,000-2,500 words): send a 250 word proposal that includes a description of the exhibition you intend to review and a brief discussion of its significance to the field of museum and curatorial studies.

Book review (1,000-1,500 words): send a 250 word proposal that includes a description of the book you intend to review and a brief discussion of its significance to the field of museum and curatorial studies.

E-mail submissions and inquiries to:

back to page index

East Asian Journal of Popular Culture

[from H-NET, 4/11/13]

We are delighted to announce the development of the new Intellect East Asian Journal of Popular Culture and to issue a general call for papers. In the last few decades there has been a huge rise in the interest in East Asian popular culture. The East Asian Journal of Popular Culture will be engaging directly with that trend. From film to music; art to translation and fashion to tourism, this journal will offer a forum where multidisciplinary work can come together in new and exciting ways.

The East Asian Journal of Popular Culture is the first academic peer-reviewed journal for scholars, teachers, and students from around the world who have an active and passionate interest in the popular culture of East Asia. The journal is devoted to all aspects of Popular Culture in East Asia. With the growth in popularity of Asian visual products in the Western world and the increasing strength of the Asian markets, this publication fulfils the need for an international journal that allows Western and Asian film, media, literary, music, fashion, digital media, television, art and cultural scholars alike to engage in discussion. The journal encourages articles that are both localised (towards a specific popular culture trend, figure or industry) as well as articles that are more global in their outlook (forging links between East Asian popular culture and wider global issues).

We welcome papers on any of these and related topics. If you would like to submit a paper or contact us about a proposed special edition please e-mail or one of the editors for further advice. This journal will also be offering in English reviews of Asian Language publications devoted to popular culture. This will bring Asian-based material via detailed summaries and reviews to an English Language readership. If you are interested in acting as a reviewer or are interested in proposing a book to be reviewed please contact the reviews editor.

Editors: Kate Taylor-Jones (Bangor University), Ann Heylen (National Taiwan Normal University), John Berra
Reviews Editor: Chris Howard (Chongqing University)

back to page index

e-Journal of East and Central Asian Religions

[from H-ASIA, 8/1/13]

It gives us great pleasure to announce the publication of the e-Journal of East and Central Asian Religions (e-JECAR), edited by Ian Astley and Henrik Sørensen, and hosted by the University of Edinburgh, UK. The journal has an international editorial board and submissions will be peer-reviewed. The first volume is scheduled for release in September 2013.

e-JECAR is concerned with the development and interaction of the religious cultures of East and Central Asia, whether historically or in the present. In particular we seek to disseminate original research on primary sources that span geographical and disciplinary boundaries. The work to appear in e-JECAR is of three types: (i) extensive research articles; (ii) essays from emerging scholars, to give (typically) younger scholars the opportunity to present recently completed work (e.g. a doctoral thesis) or to describe new work that they may be embarking on (such as a post-doctoral project or a new database); and (iii) review articles that engage with issues raised by recently published research (please note that we do not publish short, mainly descriptive book reviews).

e-JECAR is published in electronic form only and is offered to the academic community and the general public in the spirit of open scholarship and open-source technology. Authors are encouraged to exploit the opportunities offered by new technology, e.g. in including graphic materials and audio-visual sources that inform their work.

The journal will thus initially have three sections:

1. Articles
We invite substantial studies of topics covered by the journal's remit. Submissions which range across the borders of the countries of East and Central Asia (both historically and in the present) and those which avail themselves of multi-media technology in an innovative manner, are particularly welcome. The first volume will include studies by Friederike Assandri, Stephan-Peter Bumbacher, Carmen Meinert, Licia Di Giacinto, and Henrik H. Sørensen.

2. Emerging Scholars
The purpose of this section is to provide a forum for emerging scholars to present their work (typically but not necessarily work from a recent doctoral thesis) in a manner which is more formal and permanent than short reviews or postings to e-mail distribution lists. It is expected that contributors to this section will have completed their PhD or be in the final stages of completing their doctoral thesis or dissertation. Items will normally be in the region of 3,000 to 5,000 words.

3. Review Articles
Review articles are extended essays which address an issue that features in more than one major study. Whilst submissions may focus on one work, it is expected that authors will write with reference to other relevant studies in the field. We do not envisage publishing brief synopses that address critical issues incidentally. The normal length for items in this section is also 3,000 to 5,000 words.

We have elected to distribute the studies in this journal freely to the scholarly community, under the terms of the Creative Commons licence and in line with the policies of major funding bodies in the UK. Thanks are due to the University of Edinburgh, which is providing the hosting service and technical assistance for setting up and maintaining the site.

Best wishes,
Henrik Sørensen and Ian Astley
The e-Journal of East & Central Asian Religions (e-JECAR) ISSN 2053-1079 (Online)

back to page index

Transnational Subjects: History, Society and Culture

[from H-ASIA, 9/26/13]

Transnational Subjects: History, Society and Culture is a journal for cultural and transnational history post-1500. The journal is print and online, and fully peer-reviewed. We invite essays on all aspects of transnational and cultural history (4,000-7,000 words) and shorter report-type articles (less than 3,000 words) demonstrating transnational history work. We also particularly welcome digital submissions, including audio/visual work that would not be suitable for a traditional journal. Digital content will also be peer-reviewed and published on our website. Send proposals to

back to page index


[from CAA, 10/31/13]

Khan Academy's mission is a free world-class education for anyone, anywhere. In September 2013, the academy had ten million unique visitors overall. For the art-history content alone, Khan anticipates more than two million visitors from around the globe for the fall 2013 semester. Let's make sure strong, global art-history content is well represented.

If you are interested in contributing your expertise in the form of short introductory essays to help make art history accessible to a global audience, Smarthistory could really use your help. The website's founders, Steven Zucker and Beth Harris, seek art historians, archaeologists, and conservators in many areas of study; they have a particular need for specialists in African, Asian, precolonial American, and Pacific art.

Smarthistory has created an interactive list of topics, a Trello Board, with an eye toward supporting introductory art-history courses. If something important is missing, please let Zucker and Harris know! Once you've decided on a topic, send an email to Zucker and Harris (along with your CV). If everything is in order, you will be added to the Trello Board, so you can claim that topic.

Here are the essay guidelines:
- Length: 800–1,000 words
- Writing style: informal, experiential, contextual
- Content: for teaching (not original research)

As a general rule, Smarthistory looks for the narratives a great professor tells his or her class to make students fall in love with a particular subject or work of art.

All accepted contributed content is published on both and All content is published with a Creative Commons attribution and noncommercial license. You remain the owner of your content, and your contribution is always attributed.

back to page index


[courtesy of J. Kee, 12/1/13]

ARTMargins invites authors to submit full-length articles (maximum 8000 words) for possible publication. Please send inquiries or proposals to the managing editor. All submissions are peer-reviewed.

Published by MIT Press, ARTMargins publishes scholarly articles and essays about contemporary art, politics, media, architecture, and critical theory. ARTMargins studies art practices and visual culture in the emerging global margins, including Asia. The journal seeks a forum for scholars, theoreticians, and critics from a variety of disciplines who are interested in postmodernism and post-colonialism, and their critiques; art and politics in transitional countries and regions; post-socialism and neo-liberalism; and the problem of global art and global art history and its methodologies, among other things.

back to page index

Print Quarterly

[courtesy of R. Eitel-Porter, 2/26/14]

Print Quarterly is the leading peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the art of the print from its origins to the present. The journal, which publishes recent scholarship on a wide range of topics encompassing printmakers, iconography and social and cultural history, would like to encourage original contributions from scholars working on Asian topics.

Recent contributions have included such diverse subjects as Francesco Salviati, the influence of a seventeenth-century fencing manual, Jean-Etienne Liotard, a quiz on an unidentified etching, the collector Pierre-Jean Mariette, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Whistler, Soviet and Vietnamese posters, Jim Dine, comic strips, Ad Reinhardt, William Kentridge and digital prints.

back to page index

Last modified 18 Nov 2015.
[follow ACC on twitter for instant updates]

Copyright ©1996-2014 by Nixi Cura. This web page may be linked to any other web pages. Contents may not be altered. Unauthorized use or electronic dissemination is prohibited by applicable laws.