The Great Hall Exhibitions

The Great Hall Exhibitions present two exhibitions per year showcasing prominent contemporary artists. Taking place in the fall and spring semesters, the expansive great hall of the Duke House, a historic landmark building, provides an impressive setting for displaying seminal contemporary art in the center of the IFA’s academic home and community.

EXPAND//FOLD//COLLAPSE//
Sculptures by Marta Chilindron

On view November 3, 2014 to December 5, 2014
Opening reception with the artist, Tuesday, November 4, 2014, 6pm

Open to the public every Sunday from 1:00 to 4:00 PM

Lynda Benglis

Embracing the instability of perspective and form, New York artist Marta Chilindron (b. 1951, Buenos Aires) creates manipulable sculptures in transparent and colored acrylics.  Adapted from such basic geometric shapes as spheres, cubes, and pyramids, her artworks conceal their identity as complex, kinetic constructions.  Constructed from multiple panels connected by hinges, Chilindron’s sculptures are charged with transformative potential that, when activated by the viewer, cause the works to expand//fold//collapse.

An heir to international constructivism, Chilindron's artworks recall the influence of such artists as Naum Gabo, Lygia Clark, and Donald Judd.  However, to this tradition Chilindron adds her own investigations based on her interest in the dynamism and mutability of life.  Controlled by the viewer yet mediated by their constructed forms, her artworks transform shape, shift from the second to the third dimension, and extend and contract into space.  Magnified by the chromatic interplay caused by the effects of light, these changes underlie the core of her artistic practice.

Providing a dramatic contrast to the ornate interior of the Duke House, seven works by the artist will be on view in the lobby and vestibule of the Institute of Fine Arts  for the Fall 2014 Great Hall Exhibition.  Focusing on Chilindron’s engagement with idealized geometric forms, these works, executed between 2006 and 2014, will show the diversity of the artist’s practice, ranging from table-top objects such as the curvilinear Helix (2011) to her large-scale Cube 48 Orange (2014).  This latter work represents Chilindron’s expansion into immersive sculptural environments, and is being shown in New York for the first time since its debut in the Encounters exhibition at Art Basel Hong Kong, held in spring 2014.

For more information about Marta Chilindron and the exhibition, EXPAND//FOLD//COLLAPSE, please download the exhibition e-catalog (forthcoming), featuring a curatorial statement from the 2014-2015 Great Hall Exhibition co-curators, Susanna Temkin and Katherine Wright; an essay on Chilindron’s work by PhD candidate Susanna Temkin; images of Chilindron’s work; and the artist’s chronology.

The works on view for the Fall 2014 Great Hall Exhibition are courtesy of the artist and the gallery, Cecilia de Torres, Ltd.

Image credit: Marta Chilindron, Mobius, 2013, Acrylic and hinges, Variable dimensions (36 x 80 x 80 in; 91.4 x 203.2 x 203.2), Photograph by Arturo Sanchez, Courtesy of Cecilia de Torres, Ltd.

Exhibition Archive

Spring 2014

Rachel Harrison: Who Gave You This Number? April 27 to May 11, 2014

Rachel Harrison


Rachel Harrison lives and works in New York. Recent solo exhibitions include CCS Bard/Hessel Museum of Art, Annandale-on-Hudson (2009); Portikus, Frankfurt (2009); Whitechapel Gallery, London (2010); Kestnergesellschaft, Hannover (2013); and S.M.A.K., Ghent (2013). Her work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris; and the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam among many others.

The works on view for the spring 2014 Great Hall Exhibition were courtesy of the Artist and Greene Naftali, New York. This exhibition was made possible by the lead support received from Rachel Goodman Wilf and additional support from Linda Nochlin.

 

Image credit: Rachel Harrison, Party Line, 2014, Wood, polystyrene, cement, acrylic, telephone, telephone directory, and string, 82 3/4 x 28 x 24 inches (210.2 x 71.1 x 61 cm). Courtesy of the Artist and Greene Naftali, New York

Fall 2013

Lynda Benglis, September 15, 2013 to October 20, 2013

Lynda BenglisOne of the foundational figures in twentieth-century feminist art, Lynda Benglis has been creating works that explore the ways in which the body, in both its physical and cultural extensions and constraints, interacts with the world around it. Benglis first received international attention in the late 1960s for a series of works in which she poured brightly colored bands of liquid polyurethane foam and pigmented latex directly on the gallery floor. With their unconventional palette and materials and their ambiguous identity between painting and sculpture, these works initiated Benglis’s career-long project of questioning and expanding the boundaries of artistic media, materials, and form. Her works’ radical aesthetic innovation coupled with their overt critique of dominant modes of artistic practice—from modernist painting to minimalist sculpture—suggest alternative ways of seeing and being unburdened from the repressive verities and traditions of the past. This motivating dichotomy of Benglis’s art is perhaps most evident in her consistent engagement with the ostensibly antagonistic processes of creative amalgamation and material degradation, figured through the works’ invocation of melting, dripping, and deformation. This ruin-like aspect of many of Benglis’s works reveals currents of classicism and romanticism running through her oeuvre, albeit deeply informed by feminist critiques of historical continuity and expressive individualism. As such the Institute of Fine Arts provides an ideal intellectual and architectural milieu in which to examine the complex interplay between innovation and tradition that motivates a great deal of Benglis’s art.  On view at the IFA will be four artworks, two of which are seminal “pours” from the late 1960s.

This inaugural Great Hall Exhibition was organized by Professor Robert Slifkin and PhD candidate Jeffrey Uslip.

Image credit: Lynda Benglis, Night Sherbet A, 1968. Courtesy Cheim and Reid, New York.

About the Institute

Welcome to the IFA
Events Calendar

Sign up to our mailing list

If you wish to receive information on our upcoming events, please click hereOpen link in new window.

Follow us!