| On Display

The Duke House Exhibitions Series

The Duke House Exhibition Series brings contemporary art to the walls of the landmarked James B. Duke House in the form of two exhibitions per year. The work is displayed in the Gilded Age interior of the former residence of the Duke family, juxtaposing the historic with the contemporary and inviting viewers to engage with both the past and the future of the Institute.

Spring 2017

Beatrice Glow: Spice Roots/Routes

March 22 – June 19, 2017
Open to the public daily 1pm - 4pm

*note that as this is a functional space, classes and events sometimes take place in the exhibition rooms. Please consult the events calendar ahead of time.

I n Beatrice Glow: Spice Roots/Routes, Glow traces environmental degradation, wealth inequality, and the ramifications of colonialism to their historical roots in the early modern spice trade. The pursuit of spices, which she calls “the petroleum of the 17th century,” motivated conquest and colonization across Asia, the Pacific, and Latin America. Trade routes like the Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade ferried spices, silks, and other luxury goods from China and the Philippines to Spain via Mexico. Polygenetic objects like the manton de Manila, an embroidered silk shawl made in China and the Philippines that became a fashion staple among wealthy women in South America and Spain, expose these networks of influence. Glow’s Spice Route series takes compositional cues from popular manton de Manila embroidery patterns, navigating between and beyond individual cultural traditions. Each digital print highlights a plant or spice that was intertwined with the legacy of the Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade between the 17th and 19th centuries, embodying the social and economic connections forged by colonial mercantilism.

In 1890, the pursuit of intoxicating aromatic plants produced another kind of empire: the American Tobacco Company. James B. Duke’s tobacco conglomerate dominated the American market and worked extensively with distributors in the United Kingdom and East Asia before being ordered by the Supreme Court to dissolve in 1911, having run afoul of the Sherman Antitrust Act. In 1909, Duke and his wife, Nanaline, commissioned the architect Horace Trumbauer to design a mansion on Fifth Avenue. Financed by the proceeds of the lucrative tobacco trade, the Duke House is an especially fitting site for Glow’s work, a meditation on the intersection of luxury, intoxication, and commerce.

This exhibition demonstrates how these recurring patterns of exploration and exploitation speak to one another and continue to resonate with contemporary concerns. By installing the Spice Route series in the former home of James B. Duke, we also reflect on how the Institute of Fine Arts—which has made the Duke House its home since 1958—can productively engage with the history of this site.

Organized by Kristen Gaylord and Kathleen Robin Joyce
With support from Jeong-A Kim and Matthew Lee

Susan Brown joined Cooper Hewitt in 2001, where she is Associate Curator of Textiles. She curated the highly successful exhibition Fashioning Felt, and edited the accompanying catalogue. She has co-curated numerous exhibitions, including Extreme Textiles: Designing for High Performance, Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay, Quicktakes: Rodarte, and David Adjaye Selects, and contributed essays to these publications along with Design Life Now: National Design Triennial and Making Design, the museum’s collections handbook. She recently published an essay in Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe, published by Vitra Design Museum. She has published articles in Hali, Surface Design, American Craft, TextilForum, and Modern Carpet and Textile. She also teaches in the Masters’ Program in the History of Design and Curatorial Studies offered by Cooper Hewitt with Parsons/The New School for Design, as well as lecturing regularly for the Institute of Fine Arts at NYU.

Samantha De Tillio is a Brooklyn-based curator and writer. She is Assistant Curator at the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), where she specializes in post-war and contemporary craft. Some of her current research interests include performance in glass, and the intersection of craft and ecology. Her current exhibition Crochet Coral Reef: TOXIC SEAS is on view through January 22, 2017, and her upcoming exhibition Judith Leiber: Crafting a New York Story opens April 4, 2017. She is also curating the exhibition Aaron Pexa: The Spoils of Annwn, which opens at UrbanGlass in Brooklyn on May 24, 2017. De Tillio has a Master of Arts in the History of Decorative Arts from the Smithsonian Associates with George Mason University, Washington, DC, a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University at Albany. She has guest lectured at the Bard Graduate Center and is a regular contributor to GLASS: The UrbanGlass Quarterly.

Artist bio

Beatrice Glow is the 2016–2017 Artist-in-Residence at the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU at NYU and a Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics’ Council Member. She is the recipient of the Van Lier Visual Art Fellowship at Wave Hill (2015), was named a Joan Mitchell Foundation Emerging Artist Finalist (2015), and served as Artist-in-Residence at the LES Studio Program at Artists Alliance Inc (2016). Recent projects include an installation at the Honolulu Biennial (2017), a lecture performance at the Venice Biennale (2015), and solo exhibitions at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de Chile (2016), the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU (2016), and Wave Hill, New York (2015). She holds a BFA in Studio Art from NYU.

Archive

Intertwined

Julia Bland, Channing Hansen, Josh Faught, Sergej Jensen

October 11, 2016 – February 19, 2017
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m.
Saturday–Sunday, 12:00–7:00 p.m.

This exhibition brings together four fabric-based works that are inspired by, but move beyond, the strictures of painting. Each artist evokes a different fiber tradition: Sergej Jensen combines knit wool and luminous painted canvas in a composition using modernist vocabulary; Julia Bland’s stretcher-less graphic weave, hung to flutter, recalls a fringed rug or standard; Josh Faught re-presents text found in his culling of archives related to gay history in an extravagant yet elegiac piecing of hemp, linen, and lamé; and in Channing Hansen’s playful work wool is caught in a relapse toward its more familiar form as clothing. From traditional canvas to wool, hemp, linen, and lamé, the fabrics that historically supported art and craft are, for these artists, generative fine-art materials themselves. Organized by Kristen Gaylord with Rachel Vorsanger.

Public Programming

February 1, 2017, 6pm
Opening Event, and Panel Discussion

Speakers


Josh Blackwell, Fiber artist; Professor, Bennington College
BIO

Originally from New Orleans, Josh Blackwell is an artist and teacher based in New York City and Bennington, Vermont. He has exhibited his work in the US and internationally since 1999. In 2014 he received a Pollock-Krasner Grant. He has also received fellowships from the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, ZKU Berlin, Santa Fe Art Institute, the Delfina Studio Trust in London, and the Corporation of Yaddo in Saratoga Springs NY. He received an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts and a BA from Bennington College, where he has been a visiting faculty member since 2009 and joined the full time faculty in 2016. His exhibition at the Museum of Arts and Design, “Neveruses Report Progress” is the inaugural installation of the Education Department’s MAD Process Lab, a new series exploring an individual artist’s practice—from inspiration to exhibition—in great depth. It is on view until February 19, 2017. He has been represented by Kate Macgarry, London since 2004. His website is www.joshblackwell.com

Julia Bland, artist
SEE ARTIST BIO BELOW

Susan Brown, Associate Curator of Textiles, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
BIO

Susan Brown joined Cooper Hewitt in 2001, where she is Associate Curator of Textiles. She curated the highly successful exhibition Fashioning Felt, and edited the accompanying catalogue. She has co-curated numerous exhibitions, including Extreme Textiles: Designing for High Performance, Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay, Quicktakes: Rodarte, and David Adjaye Selects, and contributed essays to these publications along with Design Life Now: National Design Triennial and Making Design, the museum’s collections handbook. She recently published an essay in Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe, published by Vitra Design Museum. She has published articles in Hali, Surface Design, American Craft, TextilForum, and Modern Carpet and Textile. She also teaches in the Masters’ Program in the History of Design and Curatorial Studies offered by Cooper Hewitt with Parsons/The New School for Design, as well as lecturing regularly for the Institute of Fine Arts at NYU.

Samantha De Tillio, Assistant Curator, Museum of Arts and Design
BIO

Samantha De Tillio is a Brooklyn-based curator and writer. She is Assistant Curator at the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), where she specializes in post-war and contemporary craft. Some of her current research interests include performance in glass, and the intersection of craft and ecology. Her current exhibition Crochet Coral Reef: TOXIC SEAS is on view through January 22, 2017, and her upcoming exhibition Judith Leiber: Crafting a New York Story opens April 4, 2017. She is also curating the exhibition Aaron Pexa: The Spoils of Annwn, which opens at UrbanGlass in Brooklyn on May 24, 2017. De Tillio has a Master of Arts in the History of Decorative Arts from the Smithsonian Associates with George Mason University, Washington, DC, a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University at Albany. She has guest lectured at the Bard Graduate Center and is a regular contributor to GLASS: The UrbanGlass Quarterly.

Artist bios

Julia Bland’s works incorporate painting and weaving, developing the structures and patterns that bind disparate elements into a whole. Through weaving, cutting, sewing, dyeing, and painting, the surface becomes a visible record of her evolving, multi-faceted process. Bland earned her BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2008, and her MFA from Yale in 2012. She was awarded The Sharpe-Walentas Space Program in 2015, The Milton and Sally Michael Avery Residency at Yaddo in 2016, the Carol Scholsberg Memorial Prize in 2012, The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Trust Travel Fellowship in 2008. She has been an artist in residence at Yaddo in 2013 and 2016, The Byrdcliffe Colony in 2014, and The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2013. She has exhibited nationally and internationally and is represented by On Stellar Rays in N.Y.C.

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Channing Hansen was educated at San Francisco Art Institute, where he participated in the New Genres program. Hansen’s current work incorporates his interest in the history of science and technology into his fibre-based art practice. His work has been included in exhibitions at Solway Jones Gallery and Outpost, both Los Angeles; 18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica; Glendale College Art Gallery; Nuit Blanche, Toronto; and Hilary Crisp Gallery, London; and was most recently featured in Made in LA 2014 at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Womb-Womb Room, a collaborative installation made with Alexandra Grant based on Faith Wilding’s Crocheted Environment (1972), otherwise known as the Womb Room, was presented at Night Gallery, Los Angeles, in 2011. His work is in the collections of the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, and the Ahmanson Foundation, as well as private collections. Hansen is also active as an educator through the Mountain School of Art.

Josh Faught lives and works in San Francisco, California and is an Associate Professor at the California College of Arts in Oakland and San Francisco. Recent solo museum exhibitions include a site-specific installation at the Neptune Society Columbarium as part of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art SECA Art Award Exhibition (2013); the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, Missouri (2013); and the Seattle Art Museum in conjunction with his Betty Bowen Award (2009). His work has appeared in numerous group exhibitions, including at the Emily Foundation for the Arts, New York (2014); the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston (2014); Grazer Kunstverein, Austria (2013); Oakville Galleries, Ontario (2013); and Fiber: Sculpture 1960–Present at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2014). His work is included in the permanent collection of the SFMOMA, the ICA Boston, the Baltimore Museum of Art, and the Rubell Family Collection.

Sergej Jensen was born in Denmark in 1973 and was educated at the Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Primarily known for his textile works, his lyrical compositions incorporate a variety of fabrics, from burlap and linen to silk and wool. His work has been exhibited in a number of major international group exhibitions including Illumination, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art Humlebæk, Denmark (2016); Losing the Compass, White Cube, London (2015); and Art & Textiles: Fabric as Material and Concept in Modern Art from Klimt to the Present, Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, Germany (2013). Solo exhibitions include National Gallery of Denmark, Copenhagen (2016); Dépendance, Brussels (2015); White Cube Hong Kong (2014); Berlinische Galerie (2013); and MoMA PS1, New York (2011). He lives and works in Berlin and New York.

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