Parviz Tanavoli: Selections from the NYU Art Collection

MARCH 5–8, 2015

In celebration of 2015 Armory Focus, the Grey Art Gallery presents key early works by Parviz Tanavoli from its impressive collection of Modern Asian and Middle Eastern Art. On view at The Armory Show – Modern at Booth 400 on Pier 92, the show features approximately 25 works by the renowned pioneer of modern Iranian sculpture. Donated by Abby Weed Grey when she founded the Grey Art Gallery in 1974, the Abby Weed Grey Collection of Modern Asian and Middle Eastern Art comprises the largest holdings of modern Iranian art outside that country, including nearly 80 works by Parviz Tanavoli.

 

 

The Left Front: Radical
Art in the "Red Decade,"
1929-1940


JAN. 13–APRIL 4, 2015

The Left Front highlights work produced by American artists amid the economic and social devastation of the Great Depression. Joining forces in the John Reed Club and its successor, the American Artists’ Congress, a group of intellectuals and artists— among them Isabel Bishop, Louis Lozowick, John Sloan, and Raphael Soyer— tackled themes ranging from class struggle, civil and workers’ rights, immigration, socialist mysticism, and utopian communities to the Spanish Civil War. Presenting prints, posters, paintings, and books—including selections from NYU’s Tamiment Library—the exhibition queries what revolutionary art was then, and what it could be today. Organized by the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University, the exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated publication.


Abby Grey and Indian Modernism: Selections from the NYU Art Collection

JAN. 13–APRIL 4, 2015

In the wake of India's independence from British rule in 1947, the country's artists experimented with new approaches, forming its first modernist schools. During four trips to India from 1960 to 1968, Abby Weed Grey—
founder of NYU's Grey Art Gallery—explored this burgeoning art scene. Abby Grey and Indian Modernism: Selections from the NYU Art Collection spotlights her pioneering collecting efforts, which resulted in a significant trove of post–Indian Independence art in the United States. Featuring 29 works alongside documentation of Mrs. Grey's travels, this exhibition examines Indian modernism through the lens of her ardent engagement with India and its art. Curated by Susan Hapgood and Ranjit Hoskote, the exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated publication.

Tseng Kwong Chi:
Performing for the Camera

APRIL 21–JULY 11, 2015

Born in Hong Kong and later based in New York City,
Tseng Kwong Chi (1950–1990) produced a large body of witty, playful, performance-
based photography that both captures the pivotal Manhattan downtown and club scenes and reflects the increasingly globalized movement of people across nations and continents. In so doing, he raised critical questions about identity and culture. Featuring cutting-
edge examples from Tseng’s archive that have rarely or never been shown, Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera is the first major solo museum exhibition of his works, which have long sparked the imaginations of younger artists. Organized by the Chrysler Museum of Art and the Grey Art Gallery, NYU, the exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated catalogue.


GREY ART GALLERY / NEW YORK UNIVERSITY / 100 WASHINGTON SQUARE EAST / NEW YORK / NEW YORK / 10003 / 212-998-6780 / FAX 212-995-4024

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