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The Last Frontier: Security, Resources, and Politics in the Arctic

December 5, 2013

Ice

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet. Diminishing sea ice and melting permafrost are expanding intercontinental shipping, increasing access to energy resources and minerals, and potentially igniting geopolitical and security challenges in what many consider the world’s final frontier. Emerging from these new realities are increasingly complex challenges to sovereignty and security. What current and future geopolitical and security issues stem from increased focus on this region, and what are the implications for nations holding territory there as well as other stakeholders? The Center for Global Affairs held a conversation at NYU Washington, DC about policy challenges and potential solutions for the future of the Arctic.


CGA

Moderator


Dr. Carolyn Kissane

Dr. Carolyn Kissane serves as Academic Director and Clinical Associate Professor at the Center for Global Affairs at New York University where she teaches graduate level courses examining the Central Asian region, transformations in China, the geopolitics of oil, civil society organizations, and women’s movements. She held a two year fellowship from the Carnegie Council for Ethics and International Affairs and received a Fulbright Hayes Doctoral Dissertation Research Award, Teachers College Columbia University Dean's Grant, National Security Graduate Enhancement Fellowship, IREX Caspian Sea Fellowship, IREX travel grant for study in Kazakhstan, and an IREX Individual Advanced Research Opportunities Grant to examine the impact of natural resources on civil society development. In recognition of her unwavering commitment to education Kissane was awarded the esteemed NYU Excellence in Teaching Award in 2007 and nominated for the NYU Distinguished Teaching Award in 2008 and selected for in 2009.

Complementing her academic, public service and consultant experience, Kissane is the author of numerous publications including an article on history education in Comparative Education, Freedom House: Countries at the Crossroads report on Kazakhstan, Central Asia, Great Decisions Series, and Evaluating Human Rights Education. She also has chapters on transitional challenges in education in Central Asia and human rights education in Europe, an article on Girls’ Education and Democratization in the Post-Taliban Era and another focusing on the oil extractive industry published in Globalization, Societies and Education. She is currently writing a book on oil.

Dr. Kissane received her Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Panelists


Caitlyn Antrim

Caitlyn Antrim researches the future of the oceans, the Arctic, and the environment. Her experience as a diplomat at the Law of the Sea Conferece and the UN Conference on Environment and Development reinforce her capability as an analyst of regimes for the international commons. Her current areas of study are the geopolitics of Arctic governance, and the implementation of the Law of the Sea Convention.


Joël Plouffe

Joël Plouffe is from the National School of Public Administration (ENAP) in Montréal. He is a Research Fellow at the Center for Interuniversity Research on the International Relations of Canada and Québec (CIRRICQ), and at the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute (CDFAI). In 2013, Joël served as Québec Visiting Professor at the Jackson School for International Studies (JSIS) at the University of Washington in Seattle, where he co-led a Task Force on Arctic Security. Joël’s research deals mostly with Arctic geopolitics and Security. He is a member of the Northern Research Forum, ArcticNet's Climate Change and Arctic Shipping program, and also Managing Editor of the Arctic Yearbook (www.arcticyearbook.com). Joël is a US State Department IVLP alumnus | @joelplouffe | joel.plouffe@enap.ca

Dr. Carolyn Kissane

Dr. Carolyn Kissane

Joël Plouffe

Joël Plouffe

Caitlyn Antrim

Caitlyn Antrim

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